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Acrostic Haiku - New Form

Mattiello's avatar
By Mattiello   |   
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Sunny days,
Palpable by all,
Run amok
a
v
In the end,
Nature is dry and
Gaia is salt

I have created an extremely difficult variation of the haiku.  Yes,  some will not like it, but I assure you: this is no walk in the park.  Like the regular Haiku, this form also incorporates the 3-5-3 or the 5-7-5 syllable rule. However - to add a wonderful twist - I've blended the form of poetry known as Acrostic to the mix. In the past,  I've found that the Acrostic form of poetry is one of the most easy forms of poetry to take on, so I decided that I wanted to make it a little harder.  I think I've succeeded in that venture.

Continuing with the rules of the Acrostic Haiku, you must realize that only words that consist of 3, 6, 9, 12, etc letters can be used in this form. If you use say an 8 letter word, your last haiku/stanza will not be complete, because you'll end up with a 3-5 or a 5-7 instead of the 3-5-3 or the 5-7-5.

Now, as you continue create each stanza, you'll notice that there is a gap, or a space, in between. connecting each stanza is important for the overall effect of the poem, so let's take a look at the above poem I've created called Sunny Days.

I used the word SPRING to show the main focus of the poem. It is a 6 letter word that - because of the 3-5-3 rule - must be separated into two stanzas.  You can see that the R in spring is the last letter in the first stanza, but it also is the connecting letter (called a liason1) between itself and the I.  The I will actually start a new stanza and continue with the piece, but forgive me.  I get ahead of myself sometimes.  Focusing back on the Liason, you'll see that another word that also starts with an R and ends in an I - hence the reason it's called a liason; It is because the stanzas are connected by its own letters that I can truly say the liason weaves the stanzas even tighter than another form of poetry.  In this case, the word is Ravi( a river in India).  The a and the v are all that can be seen between the two stanzas, but I'm sure you can see that though the first stanza ends with an R and the second starts with an I, both are still also used to connect the stanzas.

The liasons continue with each new stanza created and are not used before the first and after the last stanza.

Some of you may be wondering what happens with a 3 letter word.  Wouldn't that just be a haiku?

Not when dealing with the Acrostic Haiku, it isn't.  

s
t
a
r
Single time
Under the covers
Never seen
e
b
u
l
a


As you can see, the liason is still used, even though it isn't really connecting anything visual - only thoughts. Not the best stanza, but you get the point I think.

If you have any questions, send me a note or leave a message.
© 2009 - 2020 Mattiello
1 A Liason is a french term that is used to combine two french words that end and start with a vowel - hence why the term is appropriate in this context.

©2009 Joseph L.M. Sturm. I created this particular form.

Take a look at some of my other tutorials:

:bulletred: Colons, Semicolons, and Hyphens
:bulletred: Apostrophes: Two commandments
:bulletred: How to Write Villanelles
:bulletred: How to Create Visual Poetry
:bulletred: The Acrostic Haiku
Comments129
anonymous's avatar
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haijinik's avatar
haijinikStudent Writer
like this?
haijinik's avatar
haijinikStudent Writer
that is freakin cool!! i will have to tinker with this! this link will take you to the forum post where you can access the forms i have recently devised.
AnubisNova's avatar
AnubisNovaHobbyist Writer
I am going to need this for reference. Nice job indeed. Can't wait to try it.
Mattiello's avatar
MattielloProfessional Writer
Thank you very much. I appreciate you compliment.
AnubisNova's avatar
AnubisNovaHobbyist Writer
No problem.
Ke-Anure-Eve-Spills's avatar
would it be possible to use a 2-letter liaison, lets say, if it really is the best word for the particular subject? and if so, how should it be recognized?
Mattiello's avatar
MattielloProfessional Writer
Bold the main word altogether, then italize the two letters that you want as a liaison.
Ke-Anure-Eve-Spills's avatar
hmmm... yes, i like it.
Mattiello's avatar
MattielloProfessional Writer
Great!
AinuLaire's avatar
Hehe, I started one tonight and spent about an hour, hour and half on it so far and ended up with a 21 letter, 7-haiku stanza one XD Have a three letter word, a six letter word, and a 12-letter word- well, place name type thing.

Now all I need to do is figure out what I should write for the stanzaas XD Those will be easy with the liasons out of the way (one of my liasons is a place name that is two words (a city in California); is that alright?)
Mattiello's avatar
MattielloProfessional Writer
Wow, you had better let me see it when you're finished. Are you entering in the contest?

Yes, that's quite alright. :nod:
AinuLaire's avatar
Yes, I am :D I hope the words you use don't have to be "official" words in the dictionary... I was inspired by an almost Colbert-esque word in a blog I stumbled upon (and it was 12 letters, huzzah). It's so perfect, haha.
Mattiello's avatar
MattielloProfessional Writer
As long as you explain it, and it's not completely out there. :nod:

I'll let it slide, but you must explain it.
AinuLaire's avatar
It'll be explained in the A/N, no fear ^^
demonlight's avatar
demonlightProfessional Writer
Hmm. An interesting exercise. I had a go, but I have to say, the liason words don't make for easy reading. As someone else mentioned, the elision of one word into the other is a bit clumsy. There is a tendancy to read them as words that don't exist, just because of the way the human eye works. There are some very tricky poetic forms out there, like the Pantoum, but a well written one reads well.

I'm not sure this form will, no matter how skillful it is.
Mattiello's avatar
MattielloProfessional Writer
I do know what you mean. I've been trying to figure out a way to make it read well. At the moment, the liasons have become more of a viusal stimulant than I had wanted. However, the idea is still good, so I'll try something a bit different.
pullingcandy's avatar
pullingcandyHobbyist Photographer
Does it have to be entered from my main account? This looks like a very stimulating exercise.
Mattiello's avatar
MattielloProfessional Writer
Nope, just as long as you only enter once, you'll be okay.
pullingcandy's avatar
pullingcandyHobbyist Photographer
Thanks :)
Mattiello's avatar
MattielloProfessional Writer
You're welcome.
Oleem's avatar
This sounds cool. But I think you lost me a bit at the liason part :slow: Maybe a re-read is in order when I regain my mental capacity.
Mattiello's avatar
MattielloProfessional Writer
:D I hope that goes well for you. Let me know if you have any questions.
Oleem's avatar
Alright, I think I get it now.

The liaison is still bugging me, though. It's supposed to connect "two french words that end and start with a vowel" but your example connects a consonant and a vowel, and half-words to be precise. Is it just because we're transferring the idea onto English poetry? [Sorry, I'm picky about details ^^;]

Is the liaison absolutely necessary? I think I understand the concept, but I still don't like it. Because in that example, I don't see "spr[ravi]ing" I see "spraving" which doesn't make a whole lot of sense. It seems counter-intuitive to acrostic poetry.
Mattiello's avatar
MattielloProfessional Writer
Yes, the liason is necessary.

However, that idea about the two french words that start and end with a vowel was simply a connection that I was making.

You can use any word. Some of my other comments I've left will explain more.
anonymous's avatar
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