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Redwall Creature Size Comparison by Macgyver644200 Redwall Creature Size Comparison :iconmacgyver644200:Macgyver644200 3 7
Literature
The Eeeeevil Plans of Eeeeevil Jess
The night was moonless and there was a chill on the wind.  Clouds blocked out the stars and the streetlamps had been taken down for maintenance.  It was still.  It was silent.
It was the perfect night for an evil neera to do evil things.
Jess padded through the Good Beast’s lair like the feline that resided in it.  Her magic elixir had worked like a charm!  She was invincible and simply buzzing with energy and many eevil ideas.  She’d had them buzzing around between her ears for as long as she could remember, but she could never act on them.  She was affixed to… she didn’t really remember, it probably wasn’t important.
But the elixir had helped with that.  It had made her stronger, faster.  It had freed her eeevil inhibitions.  With its help she had rendered the Tablet of The Nova powerless.  Now the Beast would be directionless.  She had inverted the Tabard of Good Chi.  His aura was broken.
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Original Star Trek species - Domlin by Macgyver644200 Original Star Trek species - Domlin :iconmacgyver644200:Macgyver644200 6 2
Literature
Ascendant Flame - Chapter III
At the bottom of the ladder were a network of caves that stretched off into the distance.  The walls were plain grey and some of the passages were somewhat narrow.  However, they were well-lit by the same stones in the wall by the ladder and Tiffany could even feel a faintly salty breeze blowing through from somewhere further back.  It was also pleasantly warm and even smooth underfoot.
What caught her attention more, though, were the people in the large area beyond one of the arches.  It was crowded with people, who took many different shapes.  There were more turtles and qilin, but there were other kinds of people, too.  In the doorway, Tiffany could see people that looked like foxes, fruit bats, hares, crows, and some other bird Tiffany couldn’t identify, among several others.  Several had scars, and she noticed one was missing a leg.
One of the hares looked up and noticed Tiffany.  He tapped a turtle on the shoulder, then reached over t
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Literature
Catwoman: Protector
The snow had let up that January night in Gotham City.  That still left the cold, that clawed at bit at the people in the city as they hustled between buildings, desperate to get out of the cold.  Most of them were at home, curled up around a fireplace or a heater, huddled under blankets and covered in sweaters.  A few people, though, didn’t have that luxury.
Selina Kyle was stamping her feet and breathing into her hands.  She was small for her age, her black hair sloppily cut short under her hat.  Her hair was oily, too, and her red-tinged olive skin was dull and dry.  As a breeze tore through her patchy overcoat and winter pants, Selina shivered, holding the sides of a magazine.
She’d stolen it.  Normally, she stuck to food, but she’d noticed the cover and had to have it.  As she turned the pages, she drank in the pictures of a wealthy family in a spacious manor.  In between text, pictures abounded.  In her part of t
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Literature
Jess and Alex's Excellent Vacation, Episode 3
(Note: Jess is not a predator.  SHE will be eaten by YOU unless she says otherwise.  She will probably not.  So don't ask.)
They got their first warning just before dawn.  The Japanese Defense Force had picked up something on the Prince Akihito Early Warning SONAR at five.  It didn’t seem especially enormous, just fourteen stories.  Still, that was very big.  Probably a kaiju.  Well worth sending a few ships out to track.
Just as the sun was coming up, five ships had raced southwards.  The good news was this creature was going to miss Tokyo (this year’s Sentai team had just disbanded, and it wasn’t time for the team-up yet).  The bad news was that this whatever-it-is would be moving southwards, to the island of Shikoku.  Or rather, it would be moving to not-Tokyo.  The locals were probably unprepared.
Captain Kasuga of the JDN [Sea Slug], kept a weather-eye on the horizon.  The ships under her command we
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Literature
Super Stomico: the Fanfiction
Super Sonico couldn’t believe it.  Two years ago, First Astronomical Velocity had sold its first gold album, and the Internet had taken notice.  Last year, the next album had gone platinum, and all of Japan started clamoring for them to play in their home town.  Then, almost two weeks ago, they had gotten a call that all of them had trouble wrapping their heads around: a venue in Korea wanted them to play for them.  Two hours ago, they had wrapped up a concert that had sold out.
And now, they were waiting at a table for the owner of the club they’d performed in to arrive.  A positive mountain of food had already been set out, consisting of bowls of miso, chicken galbi, oden, steaming Japanese curry, salmon rolls, and a big bowl of pork ramen.  The smell was savory, rich, and just the right sort of spicy.  And it was all Sonico and Suzu could do to keep a hold on Fuuru’s elbows.  “Hang on,” Suzu told her.  
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Literature
Three Minutes at the Gas Station
Carol leaned against the wall that January evening, her heart pounding and her palms sweating.  The doe’s shiny hooves felt sticky from the gas station floor, but at least she couldn’t smell anything from the nearby bathroom.  That was a plus.  She could still remember this morning, when she’d stopped to fill the car up at a different gas station.  The way it smelled, she was half expecting the trash monster from Star Wars to pop up out of the toilet.
She hoped that was why she’d thrown up.  Unfortunately, given the fact that it’d happened twice before, she had to consider some alternatives.  She didn’t have a fever, and she’d cooked at home for the past two nights.  And hope though she might, that left one very big possibility.  While her periods weren’t the most regular thing in the world, the last one felt like it’d gone a little too long.
As someone turned the corner towards her, Carol
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Mature content
A Night in Painted Canyon - by Rahheemme :iconmacgyver644200:Macgyver644200 2 0
Star Trek Original Species - Krilitaka by Macgyver644200 Star Trek Original Species - Krilitaka :iconmacgyver644200:Macgyver644200 5 0 Star Trek Al-Thalaan Senior staff by Macgyver644200 Star Trek Al-Thalaan Senior staff :iconmacgyver644200:Macgyver644200 11 0 Original Star Trek species - Ites by Macgyver644200 Original Star Trek species - Ites :iconmacgyver644200:Macgyver644200 4 0
Literature
You're Welcome, as sung by Officer Wilde
OK, I see what's happenin', yeah,
The foxxy's got a badge, it's kinda' strange,
It's kind of a big thing to ask, it's OK.
Y'know, it's nice to see you bunnies never change.
Work with me please, Flopsy, dear,
No, this isn't just a costume, so we're clear.
I'm not gonna' make ya' see the light,
'cause I just don't wanna' have that fight.
So what can I say except 'you're welcome',
For walkin' the beat for squat.
Hey, it's OK, it's OK, 'you're welcome,'
It isn't like I really do a lot.
Just get up ev'ry day before the sun
For a psycho with a handgun
That's fun!
Coffee break mid-day,
Chase down two thugs along the way,
Like everybody, nay?
Hey!
I haggle for hostage release,
(You're welcome)
Then Naked Drunk disturbs the peace.
Long after daylight has died,
(You're welcome)
Bam! Duodecuple homicide!
So what can I say except you're welcome,
for dealing with punk gang wars,
There's no need for praise, it's OKs, you're welcome,
Just keeping safe this neighborhood of yours.
You're welcome...
You
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Original Star Trek species - Serat by Macgyver644200 Original Star Trek species - Serat :iconmacgyver644200:Macgyver644200 5 0
Literature
Jess and Alex's Excellent Vacation, Episode 2
(Author’s note: Jessica-Rae-3 does not like being a predator, as she has stated herself.  I make this depiction of her as a predator with her express permission and her explicit trust.  Don’t ask her for either and do not ask her to eat you.  It won’t happen.)
The next morning, Jess pulled herself awake.  The brunette with the brown mouse ears reached up to rub her eyes, her other hand still on her stomach.  The swell had dropped in the night, and her stomach was no longer aching with too much cheese.  However, now it was her back that ached.  As she carefully made her way up on her feet, she arched her back.  She kept this up for a few moments, then she started to walk off into the forest.
“AAAHH!”
Instantly, Jess’s eyes shot open and sped down to the ground.  At her feet was a… she didn’t know what it was.  She very carefully put her foot down.  If she didn’t know better, she
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Romulan Uniforms, take 2 by Macgyver644200 Romulan Uniforms, take 2 :iconmacgyver644200:Macgyver644200 0 2

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Activity


OK, this is long enough already, so I think I'll just jump into it.  Gotta' say, this was kind of difficult to compile.  Part of that was, well, twenty-two items, but part of it was trying to rank individual successes and failures versus overall smoothness.  I think I can settle on this one though, (at least until I finish the series again).  So, let's get down and dirty, starting with the worst...

22. Taggerung: I thought I hated Mossflower for not having dramatic tension.  I thought I hated Outcast of Redwall for how rancid its message got.  Little did I know I’d hate this book so much for giving me both at once.  I went into this expecting that it wouldn’t use its theme of ‘goodbeast growing up among the vermin’ to full effect.  I didn’t expect a) that it’d cop out of its theme so early and so unbelievably or b) that it’d go for such a full-on double standard.  I’m not kidding, it asked me to excuse things that have gone more than a little beyond what the previous books have done (and the bounds of good taste) on the flimsiest of reasons.  Not helping is a complete deus ex machina that makes a prior complete deus ex machina completely pointless.  I knew coming out of this that was going to be my most hated Redwall book.  The good stuff wasn’t that common and the bad stuff was just AWFUL.

 

21. Mossflower: This isn’t as rancid as Taggerung or Outcast and includes a sympathetic member of a ‘vermin’ race (the wildcats).  It also has one of the most ambitious final plans I’ve ever seen and a rather interesting cast of villains.  But none of that can make up for the fact that there’s such a major power mismatch between the heroes and villains.  All the heroes do is win.  Any time the villains have an advantage, the heroes just happen to have something that can undo it.  That’s the quickest way to kill tension you can imagine.  Combine that with a whole major plotline leading up to almost nothing in the end, and you have something I really wish I didn’t have to slog through.

 

20. Outcast of Redwall: This could have worked.  We saw this plot work in the book released before this one.  But for some reason, we didn’t get that plot.  We spend more time on someone else than the title character.  Don’t get me wrong, Sunflash’s plot isn’t a bad one.  In fact, it actually helps lift the story up a little.  But it’s not the one promised in the title.  And that one just stinks.  Veil is a sociopath, as both he and the narrator are quick to point out.  His mother figure Bryony is kind of an idiot for not realizing this over that long a time.  The abbey dwellers are just noxious for stating that this infant is destined to be evil because of how he was born (though maybe they’re just reading the prose).  Bottom line, this is potential just squandered for whatever reason.

 

19. Triss: When it starts off, it’s actually pretty solid.  The characters are constantly on the move, the annoying characters get their comeuppance quickly (including the dibbuns!), and a fascinating story is set up.  Then it starts to stall out.  The big problem with having an Scarum as the comic relief is that he’s always a drain on the other characters.  You can only punish him so often before you get frustrated by his inability to change (though at least he’s only got sporadic shrieks of annoying rather than a long whine).  Combine that with Redwall siege that feels like it’s in there just because it has to be, a villain that’s dealt with a paragraph after the encounter starts, and one final bit of unpunished stupidity from the idiot leading into the climax, and this book ends on a low note.

 

18. High Rhulain: This was just kinda’ boring.  You’ve got a cool idea at its heart, a decent central character, and an interesting set of villains, as well as callbacks to a species we haven’t seen in a while and the aftermath of Salamandastron.  Beyond that, though?  Not a whole lot.  It suffers from the usual ‘good guys win early and all the time’ and the pacing is pretty clunky.  On top of that, I feel like several ideas weren’t really given the time they could’ve been to really make them shine.  If you start with this one, I get the feeling your opinion will be different.  If this is your eighteenth foray into the series, though (like with me) expect to be getting really tired of this sort of thing.

 

17. Doomwyte: A lot of people call this book a retelling of an earlier one (The Pearls of Lutra) and, for once, I agree with them.  It really does follow a lot of the same beats and features a lot of the same characters.  It does a few things differently, but they’re mostly superficial and not in ways that improve on the original.  While it is cool to have our first avian main villains, they don’t stand out otherwise.  On top of it, the double standard between vermin and goodbeasts is kind of confusing here.  We have an undeniably evil goodbeast and we’re expected to feel bad for a couple of vermin, but the goodbeast is given way too much slack and vermin and goodbeast are treated in such different ways you can’t help but notice.  It held my interest for several scenes, but that’s prettymuch it.

 

16. Loamhedge: This was actually surprisingly good, if still flawed.  While it has a repeat of Scarum from Triss in Horty, Horty proves a little more useful and fixable.  It’s also got Martha, who’s possibly my favorite hare character in the series, my favorite band of vermin, and my most favorite Redwall siege in the series.  Speaking as someone with a disability, it also features a pretty decent overall portrayal of someone with a disability (the major problem people have with it is one individual part of it, and still worth addressing).  Sadly, there’s also a disjointedness in the two plots near the end and a less-than-stunning resolution to a particular plotline (though there was one moment at the end that made me laugh as intended).  This felt a little experimental and it did alright.


15. Martin the Warrior: I’m sorry, folks, but I could only find this OK.  Badrang the Tyrant is just on a steady losing streak, broken only briefly after he gets all of his archers to kill one person who still beats him senseless.  The main characters aren’t especially interesting, and they’re stuck in a random events plot.  Granted, the random tribes they encounter can be interesting, but the events don’t feel like they add up to anything until they suddenly do.  I’m also expected to, if not forgive, forget a few bad things from goodbeasts, one case specifically and in one case because they’re showing up to beat the bad guy.  The story doesn’t do anything especially painful, it just doesn’t do a whole lot of anything especially good.

 

14. Lord Brocktree: OK, just up front, this book should be named Dottie.  I know Lord Brocktree’s the focal character, but Dottie’s the more interesting and dynamic character and Salamandastron and The Long Patrol were both taken.  It starts off kinda’ indecisive.  On the one hand, Salamandastron is conquered (off-screen), on the other, the heroes are kind of unbeatable.  They fight a pike and it maybe makes them catch their breath a bit (for those who don’t know, Cluny was tough because he only lost an eye to a pike when he defeated it).  On top of that, there’s a dibbun in the picture that can be cloying and one of the characters we see a lot of has a name that made me roll my eyes and go ‘really?’  You’ll know him when you see him.  It finally starts to get interesting in the middle, though, and the ending’s alright.  There’s also a romantic subplot with Dottie that has a premise I really have to use sometime.

 

13. Salamandastron: It’s alright.  That’s most of what I remember.  The characters aren’t really very memorable (and they do a few things that made me wince) and it uses a plotline that’s completely disconnected from the rest of the story, but it does a few interesting things.  It has the first case of vermin who were actually vermin trying to turn good in Thura and Dingeye.  It has the abbey having to deal with a plague, which is pretty effective.  It’s got a decently funny pair-up of father and son villains.  It’s even got an interesting action setpiece or two.  But it doesn’t have a whole lot else, or anything that really sparkles.

 

12. The Sable Quean: Oh, this is going to be fun to explain.  Let me just say, there’s a lot in this book to like.  It’s got several interesting characters, including deeper vermin characters, and it was nice to return to a place mentioned previously.  Best of all was the villain, who was actually really interesting, somewhat effective, but she does something not a lot of villains do and I think she does it really well (no joke, it’s one of my favorite moments in the series for how effective I think it is).  Plus, we get a lot of buildup where the main characters are on the back foot… which all gets undone in almost a parade of deus-ex-machinas and one outright continuity error.  Plus, I think this is the story where the plot is the most overtly… bigoted. Seriously, it flat out says ‘the only good vermin is a dead vermin’ in the place of a moral, which was being said by a whole faction of the good guys and it feels like I’m being expected to just shrug and accept this.  Finally, it’s got Diggs, Flib, and Tragedia, three characters I was consistently annoyed or disturbed by.  If it weren’t for the good points in this book, it’d be even lower on the list.  As is, though, its peaks are high, but that makes its valleys feel all the lower.

 

11. The Long Patrol: This had two interesting plotlines.  The first was the plot of what’s going wrong with the abbey wall, which is sinking into the ground and leads to a nice exploration plot that’s a nice bonus for the continuity-minded (if a little strange).  The second is the first really original hare since Basil Stag Hare: Tammo.  His story’s about him wanting to join the eponymous Long Patrol and him discovering just what that means.  It doesn’t do a whole lot of sugar-coating either: he finds out firsthand (well, paw) just what it means to take a life and he doesn’t take well to it.  He doesn’t wash out, but it still effects him.  Overall, it was fun to read.  If only the villain wasn’t so bland I only recently remembered his name.

 

10. The Rogue Crew: I wanted to be nice to this because of the conditions of its release (Jacques had died right after finishing it), but I didn’t have to.  While the Rogue Crew are… brutal, there are other characters to keep their worst excesses in check.  On top of it, Razzid is a very effective villain despite his shaky introduction (and a headshaking deus ex machina).  The landsailing is a little weird, though.  It apparently happened a long time ago, but I'm not sure that's how it worked.  Lastly, the characters are pretty decent, even if there are quite a few of them.  A nice note to go out on.


09. The Pearls of Lutra: OK, the main characters are about as interesting as sawdust even by this point in the series and baddies fall before them like cards, but that’s really the only problem I have with this book.  The main plot with the pearls actually goes in an interesting direction, but there’s also an interesting plot thread with the goings-on before the heroes show up.  This really lets the villains show what they’re made of.  Plus, it has my favorite bad guy, Ublaz, who’s got an interesting gimmick of his own and is actually pretty tough.  All-in-all, quite interesting.

 

08. Marlfox: This was actually a nice departure from the norm.  Barring their quite frankly embarrassing introduction, the titular Marlfoxes are actually surprisingly effective as Redwall villains go, and their underlings are an interesting look (well, peek) at a villain who doesn’t really want to be a villain.  There’s also some bad behavior from goodbeasts that’s not given any kind of excuse (though there is some that is).  There’s a deus ex machina near the end, but the actual ending is one of the most interesting in the series.
 

07. The Bellmaker: This is an odd story broken into three parts.  One feels underdeveloped and one’s decently tense barring a deus ex machina, and both are married to an embarrassing villain.  The third, though, about a vermin finding himself at home in Redwall, is excellent.  Blaggut is one of my favorite characters for a reason, and his plot of self-realization is simply masterful.  If that were the whole book, this would definitely be number one on the list.  Unfortunately, the other two just can’t keep pace with it.

 

06. The Legend of Luke: Again, this is mainly for one particular plotline.  For the first half of the book and the last five chapters, it’s an entirely different and disconnected story, one much like Martin the Warrior.  For the most part, it’s a set of by-the-book random encounters, barring one very disturbing scene from an otter that I’m asked to forgive because vermin happened to him or something (I didn’t; it was technically victimless but still firmly villainous behavior).  At the halfway point, though?  Something entirely different that I actually really enjoyed, the story of Martin’s father Luke.  This story’s actually pretty compelling, with a character I sympathize with, a cast that earns the breaks it gets, and a climax that hits all the right notes.  If only it weren’t stuck to the Martin story.

 

05. Eulalia!: This was a nice change of pace, somewhat.  Something interesting is that all of the focus characters are flawed: one’s a badger with a bad case of the bloodwrath, one’s a hedgehog with kleptomania, one’s a hare who’s about to be drummed out of the Long Patrol.  However, while they do change as characters, it’s front-loaded two times out of three and sort of handwaved the other time.  Likewise, the villains are pretty decent and allowed to be effective on multiple occasions, even if they get crimped several times.  The most annoying part for me, though, was the Tabura, who’s this fawned-over character who’s supposedly been very important to the world for a long time but which we haven’t seen in eighteen books and (by my estimation) about 300 years.  Still, it was an enjoyable read.

 

04. Redwall: Yep, it’s the classic.  Yep, it’s down here (or rather, ‘down’ here).  I really don’t hate it: it fleshes out its world in a magnificent manner, Matthias is a good lead character who meets some very interesting people along his journey, and nothing’s really very wrong with the book that sets up most everything.  It’s a good, solid story.  However, I think later books did a few things better, such as main villains (you have to admit, Cluny really has a low bar to climb) and its characters aren’t quite as fascinating as other books.  Still, it’s a classic for a reason.

 

03. Rakkety Tam:  Part of this may have been the three-hour car ride I had to read it on, but I found it surprisingly hard to put this book down.  Gulo the Savage is an amazing villain, and easily one if not THE most effective in the series.  Even when the switch flips, he’s still capable of kicking butts and taking names even up to the final battle.  There are a few problems, though.  His gimmick is… not for the faint of heart, especially when Jacques describes it just enough for you to see too much (though he is at least trying to be sparing).  In addition, there’s this one character who’s a thief who can get pretty annoying.  However, I still enjoyed reading it, even if I’d lay off on the Redwall sieges by now (this one started OK but turned kinda’ ridiculous).

 

02. Mariel of Redwall: If I were to pick the most ‘adult’ Redwall book, this would be it, and I don’t mean that in a Family Guy kind of way.  I mean this is one of the most thought-out and mature books in the series.  Whole plots revolve around the technology in the area, the heroes are actually put into peril several times throughout the book, and the main villain, Gabool the Wild, is really quite… fascinating.  It could be deeper and the ending was a bit of a letdown, but I was satisfied with what I got.

 

01. Mattimeo: Everything Redwall did, I think this book improved on.  The villain is more effective and a little more memorable.  The heroes are put through their paces and (bar one moment at the end) their victories seem earned.  It’s got a great sense of wonder at the unknown regions the characters travel to.  It even has a character arc for the title character.  I’m kind of sad this is all we see of Mattimeo, but I’m glad I got this at least.

So there's my ranking.  What do you think of all of them?  How many have you read?  Leave a comment down below and see who thinks you've got a point!  Just keep it civil.  Now, though, I have to get back to Redwall and record my introduction.  So, you guys have fun.

Finally finished the last Redwall book!  Expect my thoughts later today.
Redwall Creature Size Comparison
So, this is kinda' crude, obviously.  That's on purpose, I wasn't intending this to be especially artistic here (at first, then I thought 'why not', then I realized 'that's why').  This was just meant to be a general guide to the sizes of every regularly occurring species of creature in Redwall, and I kind of wanted to share it because I found it interesting how my research turned out.  To get these sizes, I looked at Wikipedia and either used or calculated the average length in millimeters of each species (because it's a little easier to work with).  It helps that the smallest of these, the shrew, is an even 70mm and I'm really good at my times tables.

But yeah, you can see something interesting right out of the gate.  The shrew (more specifically, the common shrew) is 70mm on average.  The European badger is about 750mm.  That's a size difference on a factor of about 10-11x.  And both of these species regularly visit/live at the same Abbey with no complaints.  Either the architects of the abbey were geniuses at designing for a variety of species or they've been anthropomorphized closer in size to each other.  Jacques seems to have left that up to the reader.  While I'd love to go with the first explanation, the second's the more practical one, so that's what I'm going with.*  Another thing you can notice is that, while most vermin are bigger than most of the goodbeasts, they're still commonly outclassed by other goodbeasts.  If there's an exception to that, it's not common.  That could just be coincidence, though; I doubt Jacques was quite thinking of how long each species was exactly.

*That being said, in a world where shrews only come up to a badger's knee on the best of days, I just know the shrew doubles as a unit of measure.  And they hate it.

Just to keep my work checked, here's the list of species and their lengths (which I'm assuming does not include the tail).
Common shrew (Sorex araneus) 70mm
Wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) 90mm (In hindsight, I could've used the house mouse, but let's just go with this one because I think they're cuter.)
Bank vole (Myodes glareolus) 100mm (I debated using this one because it basically looks like a mouse.)
European mole (Talpa europea) 136mm
European water vole (Arvicola amphibius) 180mm (Also known as the water rat, and if you thought mice and voles looked alike...)
Least weasel (Mustela nivalis) 185mm
Red squirrel (Sciurus vulgaris) 210mm
Brown rat (Rattus norvegicus) 210mm
European hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus) 230mm
Stoat (Mustela erminea) 247mm
Ferret (Mustela putorius furo) 500mm (Which is, on a side note, a domesticated version of the polecat.  Proof that Redwall is post-apocalyptic?  I hope not, that's too easy.)
European pine marten (Martes martes) 530mm
European wildcat (Felix silvestris) 650mm
Red fox (Vulpes vulpes) 670mm
European hare (Lepus europaeus) 675mm
Eurasian otter (Lutra lutra) 740mm
European badger (Melis melis) 750mm (I ran out of room, that's why this one's sideways).

Here are a few that aren't quite as common or aren't mammals, but show up in the series to an extent that I wanted to include them.
Pygmy shrew (Sorex minutus) 52mm
Common toad (Bufo bufo) 140mm
Golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) 155mm
House sparrow (Passer domesticus) 160mm
Common kestral (Falco tinnunculus) 355mm
European rabbit (Oryctolagus coniculus) 370mm
European polecat (Mustela putorius) 375mm
Eurasian magpie (:iconpikapikaplz:) 440mm
Northern pike (Esox lucius) 475mm
Common raven (Corvus corax) 630mm
Common European adder (Vipera berus) 750mm
Golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) 820mm
Wolverine (Gulo gulo) 860mm
Desert monitor (Veranus grisius) 1000mm (I'm guessing Sampetra is based on the Canary Islands or something in that area and that said giants among animals were descended from sailors who'd gotten themselves lost.)
Harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) 1400mm (I admit, I guessed on this one based on weight ranges and max length)
Mute swan (Cygnus olor) 1470mm
Oceanic whitetip shark (Carcharhinus longimanus) 1850mm (My best guess to be haunting the waters off of Mossflower with that much vigor).

** ...I'm sorry... I had to.
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So, just finished Doomwyte, got two books to go before I start doing in-depth reviews.  In the interest of updating this, I thought I'd go into a little more detail about something I wanted to try.  For as long as I can remember, I've always found alternate possibilities really fascinating, especially as the ideas that got left on the cutting room floor.  Plus, as I've been thinking through this series, I've picked up a number of what-ifs that I've gotten a lot of fun out of toying with.  These vary in complexity from changing a few events to flat-out changing the whole plotline, and I think some of the ideas could tickle some interest out of other people like they do with me.

So, here's the plan for my reviews.  One week, I'll do a review of a book.  This is pretty much like other review shows: I look at the book, point out what I liked and didn't like, give a little overview, and end with my thoughts overall.  The next week, though, I'll go into a little more detail and compare and contrast my ideas with the original.  Part of this is wanting to give myself a relative breather while still putting out content and part of it's because I really like these ideas and want to share them.  However, I also want to try and focus on being constructive: making people think 'how would I do things differently' more often, if I can and kind of explain my own tastes to anyone who might not see where I'm coming from.

So, on to Redwall in general.  If I wrote the series, the individual races would become much more granular in terms of ethicality.  Bad goodbeasts and sympathetic vermin would show up pretty regularly.  Villains would also strike much harder.  Also, the series would become more of a history.  More specifically, the history of four groups and how they eventually coalesced into being the rulers of Mossflower Country.  The first would be the beasts in and around Redwall, the second would be Salamandastron, the third would be GUOSIM, and the fourth... well, they'd be something new.  A vermin village called Vonklip.  The story would go something like this...




In the beginning, there were four loose clans: rodents, mustelids, leporids, and eulipotyphlans (shrews, hedgehogs, and moles).  For countless seasons before the recording of history, these clans were bunched together.  But then some drifted away.  The badgers, given to solitude, withdrew from the other mustelids.  Likewise, the shrews were irrepressible in their temperaments and left to govern themselves on their own.  Finally, the rats longed for adventure, and left to go exploring.  The other species simply interacted with each other in varying ways according to their dominant cultures.  This was the way for the longest time.

Then the wildcats came to Mossflower.

The forces, under the command of the distant Emperor Mortspear, were small in number, but they had the twin advantages of technology and diplomacy.  They'd soon convinced the mustelids (including the reluctant otters) and the rats to join them in conquering Mossflower Country.  Salamandastron alone remained free due to the famed Long Patrol and the efforts of Lord Brocktree.  The other beasts, outmatched in raw strength and technology, surrendered after a bloody war.  Still, the terms were peaceful, and the King (later Emperor) Verdauga Greeneyes was a lenient and charismatic ruler.  For a while, thought of rebellion died down in the newly renamed Empire of Kotir, though the rodents, moles, and hedgehogs never forgot their defeat or forgave their overlords.  Even as they were protected from the actions of the Doomwytes and the Great Worms, they never forgot.

Eventually, Verdauga died, and Tsarmina took over.  Within the year, her abrasive and murderous tendencies managed to drive Kotir into open rebellion again.  This time, though, they had help.  Not only had the otters deserted the other mustelids, not only had Salamandastron finally built up the manpower to fight back, but they had a symbol: a mouse from the north named Martin.  While he proved an able swordsbeast and an unconquerable spirit, he was also a gifted diplomat, pulling the subjugated beasts and their allies together to fight as one.  At last, Kotir was collapsed and Tsarmina was slain.

The wildcats and their collaborators were exiled (barring a few allies).  Begrudging and licking their wounds, they traveled south and set up the town of New Kotir.  Things went... less than smoothly.  Already mostly ungifted in the knowledge of farming, mining, or doing anything beyond fighting, they suffered setback after setback, as well as the lingering animosity of the other beasts in the area (who suffered from their animosity as well).  This sense of enmity continued for many, many seasons.

Over the years, though, a pawful of events sparked a thaw in relations.  First was the work of Veil, a ferret raised at Redwall, who brought with him knowledge of agriculture and started to cool relations between the vermin, as they had come to be called, and the other beasts.  This was bolstered by the case of Blaggut, who came to live at Redwall.  The final big measure, though, was the Treaty of the Summer of Fever.  This formalized trade and political relations between Salamandastron and the vermin village, which was renamed to Vonklip, Vermin Of New Kotir Living In Peace.

Since then, relations have continued to stabilize.  Salamandastron remains the military headquarters of Mossflower's Long Patrol and many other fighting forces consider it a useful place to train in combat and smithing.  Vonklip has become famous for its market, not only being an economic stronghold in the region, but an unofficial home of embassies for nations from Southsward to Riftgard.  But above them is Redwall, a home of learning, healing, and peace, and the more-or-less official meeting ground of the many factions of Mossflower.



So, yeah, there's the basics.  They might change if I get any ideas, since this only goes up part of the way through the series, but this is where everything would start.  Expect me to go into more detail when I get to reviews of individual books, but that's all for now.  Now to finish the series, pick it up again, and figure out a good place to post these reviews to.  I'll keep you posted.
Alright, I've finished Loamhedge, so I've only got another six books to go.  Given I have a long break coming up, I might be able to knock out another two this weekend if my (spotty) focus holds.  Given that still means it'll be a while before I finish, I think I'll share a few universal thoughts about Redwall as a whole.  Plus, I'm gonna' be following that up with a twenty-two item list; I should probably bifurcate a little.  Plus, I have a few ideas I'd really love to share.

Well, let's start with one little thing.  Up until Taggerung, most of the Redwall books were connected by characters from a previous book.  For example, Outcast of Redwall features Bella of Mossflower, being the only member of CORIM left, and The Pearls of Lutra featured Auma from Mattimeo.  I liked this, it gave the series a sense of... continuity(?), keeping a connection to the past while also letting things move forwards in time.  One of the things that hurts Salamandastron to me is the fact that I can't get a general feel of where it occurs, leaving this indeterminate stretch of time between Redwall's completion and the time of Matthias.  Likewise, I'm sad to see the lack of such in Triss and Loamhedge, and sad to see that it seems not to be a thing in later books (based on a skim through the Redwall wiki).  There's a callback to the events of Mattimeo in the latter book, but nothing that gives a sense of immediate connection to Triss.

Another thing I like is that it's not always the battles that swing the war.  For example, part of Mariel of Redwall depends on the kinds of weapons everyone has and what they can do with them.  Thinking through a battle instead of just fighting through it shows up several times.  In fact, I'd almost say that Martin's use of riddles and indirect statements is not just dramatic license, but also to encourage critical thinking.  There are even some bonuses for the more learned readers, such as the fact that Martha from Loamhedge has a form of conversion disorder.

This leads to the last thing I really want to talk about, the general messages/themes.  Ignoring the 'vermin bad' stuff, there are actually a few positive messages scattered all throughout the series.  War isn't easy and not everyone can kill another person no matter the target or reason.  That's fine, there are other things you can do if you can't fight, including retreat to live in peace.  However, evil isn't just going to go away, and you have have to fight it, and effectively.

Other aspects of the series I'm more mixed on.  On the one hand, the series has a generally consistent (and often interesting) geography and it remembers a lot of things from its past.  I was delighted to realize that a location from a past book was going to be returning in my then-current volume.  However, there are a few things it gets wrong and a lack of... let's call it roots for various bad guys, like they're just popping up out of the ground.  This is most obvious in the Juska from Taggerung, who are an entire group of groups of people who've popped up without any prior signs that they were even a thing.

Then there's the vermin-goodbeast divide, where one is evil and the other is good.  There are exceptions, I'm happy to note, but the general rule is enforced by viewpoint characters and even the narrator from time to time.  I don't really have a problem with black and white villains and heroes; as long as both are competent; I can stand a story without a whole lot of moral ambiguity.  However, trying to divide this down easily visible lines is becoming an increasing no-no, especially when the story itself doesn't entirely support it.

And there comes my most pressing problem with the series: the battles often feel very one-sided.  Maybe I'm wrong, maybe I've just gotten used to how Harry Potter does things, but I've noticed the good guys tend to get more frequent victories and more decisive victories than the bad guys do.  If the good guys lose anyone, the bad guys will be practically dropping like flies or be portrayed as almost bungling idiots.  Even if it makes sense in the story, it's not very tense to have such a mismatch.

Overall, this feels like most books in this series would do better with an edit.  This doesn't really surprise me, given Brian Jacques admitted he tended to write by the seat of his pants and finish a novel in about four or five months.  On the one hand, this keeps a VERY impressive pace (trust me, I know from experience how hard that is).  On the other, they could definitely be polished some more, which is something I want to delve into as I review the books in-depth.

In general, if I were remaking the books (let's assume that's a thing), there are three things I'd be doing.  The first is dealing with the vermin.  I'd still have good guys and bad guys, but you couldn't tell who they are at first glance.  For example, I'd include some good vermin in Redwall as refugees who've been displaced by Cluny and are happy to join the fight.  I also wouldn't be above making a few alterations, such as making a few of Gabool's captains in Mariel of Redwall goodbeasts.  Nothing major, but spreading things out.

This ties into my second thing: a greater emphasis on continuity.  Not that the books don't do this, but I'd love to go into more depth about what would happen between books.  This'd be most pressing in the books after Mossflower, where things have changed drastically between the vermin and goodbeast and the two are trying to find a new relationship, going from bitter enemies to eventual friends.  I'd also love to see relations sprout up between various lands from the series, from Southsward to Sampetra to Riftgard.

Lastly, I'd try and deepen themes I noticed in the individual books.  A lot of times, they're in the story, just relatively unexplored.  For example, Marlfox has the theme of familial expectations with the Marlfoxes and the Regubas.  That could make a very fascinating story and add more depth to both the villains and the heroes.  Other times, a related theme could add a little more depth.  The Pearls of Lutra has at its heart a cautionary tale about greed and the value of a simple life, which is nice but leaves some characters underdeveloped.  Making it about want versus need gave me a few ideas about how to deepen several of the characters, including Martin and Bladeribb.

So, those are my basic thoughts.  I'll be getting into more detail on all of the books in the series later on, once I finish all of them, then I'll go into individual details.  If you've got any ranked lists you want to make, please link them in the comments, I'd love to see them!  Until later!

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OK, this is long enough already, so I think I'll just jump into it.  Gotta' say, this was kind of difficult to compile.  Part of that was, well, twenty-two items, but part of it was trying to rank individual successes and failures versus overall smoothness.  I think I can settle on this one though, (at least until I finish the series again).  So, let's get down and dirty, starting with the worst...

22. Taggerung: I thought I hated Mossflower for not having dramatic tension.  I thought I hated Outcast of Redwall for how rancid its message got.  Little did I know I’d hate this book so much for giving me both at once.  I went into this expecting that it wouldn’t use its theme of ‘goodbeast growing up among the vermin’ to full effect.  I didn’t expect a) that it’d cop out of its theme so early and so unbelievably or b) that it’d go for such a full-on double standard.  I’m not kidding, it asked me to excuse things that have gone more than a little beyond what the previous books have done (and the bounds of good taste) on the flimsiest of reasons.  Not helping is a complete deus ex machina that makes a prior complete deus ex machina completely pointless.  I knew coming out of this that was going to be my most hated Redwall book.  The good stuff wasn’t that common and the bad stuff was just AWFUL.

 

21. Mossflower: This isn’t as rancid as Taggerung or Outcast and includes a sympathetic member of a ‘vermin’ race (the wildcats).  It also has one of the most ambitious final plans I’ve ever seen and a rather interesting cast of villains.  But none of that can make up for the fact that there’s such a major power mismatch between the heroes and villains.  All the heroes do is win.  Any time the villains have an advantage, the heroes just happen to have something that can undo it.  That’s the quickest way to kill tension you can imagine.  Combine that with a whole major plotline leading up to almost nothing in the end, and you have something I really wish I didn’t have to slog through.

 

20. Outcast of Redwall: This could have worked.  We saw this plot work in the book released before this one.  But for some reason, we didn’t get that plot.  We spend more time on someone else than the title character.  Don’t get me wrong, Sunflash’s plot isn’t a bad one.  In fact, it actually helps lift the story up a little.  But it’s not the one promised in the title.  And that one just stinks.  Veil is a sociopath, as both he and the narrator are quick to point out.  His mother figure Bryony is kind of an idiot for not realizing this over that long a time.  The abbey dwellers are just noxious for stating that this infant is destined to be evil because of how he was born (though maybe they’re just reading the prose).  Bottom line, this is potential just squandered for whatever reason.

 

19. Triss: When it starts off, it’s actually pretty solid.  The characters are constantly on the move, the annoying characters get their comeuppance quickly (including the dibbuns!), and a fascinating story is set up.  Then it starts to stall out.  The big problem with having an Scarum as the comic relief is that he’s always a drain on the other characters.  You can only punish him so often before you get frustrated by his inability to change (though at least he’s only got sporadic shrieks of annoying rather than a long whine).  Combine that with Redwall siege that feels like it’s in there just because it has to be, a villain that’s dealt with a paragraph after the encounter starts, and one final bit of unpunished stupidity from the idiot leading into the climax, and this book ends on a low note.

 

18. High Rhulain: This was just kinda’ boring.  You’ve got a cool idea at its heart, a decent central character, and an interesting set of villains, as well as callbacks to a species we haven’t seen in a while and the aftermath of Salamandastron.  Beyond that, though?  Not a whole lot.  It suffers from the usual ‘good guys win early and all the time’ and the pacing is pretty clunky.  On top of that, I feel like several ideas weren’t really given the time they could’ve been to really make them shine.  If you start with this one, I get the feeling your opinion will be different.  If this is your eighteenth foray into the series, though (like with me) expect to be getting really tired of this sort of thing.

 

17. Doomwyte: A lot of people call this book a retelling of an earlier one (The Pearls of Lutra) and, for once, I agree with them.  It really does follow a lot of the same beats and features a lot of the same characters.  It does a few things differently, but they’re mostly superficial and not in ways that improve on the original.  While it is cool to have our first avian main villains, they don’t stand out otherwise.  On top of it, the double standard between vermin and goodbeasts is kind of confusing here.  We have an undeniably evil goodbeast and we’re expected to feel bad for a couple of vermin, but the goodbeast is given way too much slack and vermin and goodbeast are treated in such different ways you can’t help but notice.  It held my interest for several scenes, but that’s prettymuch it.

 

16. Loamhedge: This was actually surprisingly good, if still flawed.  While it has a repeat of Scarum from Triss in Horty, Horty proves a little more useful and fixable.  It’s also got Martha, who’s possibly my favorite hare character in the series, my favorite band of vermin, and my most favorite Redwall siege in the series.  Speaking as someone with a disability, it also features a pretty decent overall portrayal of someone with a disability (the major problem people have with it is one individual part of it, and still worth addressing).  Sadly, there’s also a disjointedness in the two plots near the end and a less-than-stunning resolution to a particular plotline (though there was one moment at the end that made me laugh as intended).  This felt a little experimental and it did alright.


15. Martin the Warrior: I’m sorry, folks, but I could only find this OK.  Badrang the Tyrant is just on a steady losing streak, broken only briefly after he gets all of his archers to kill one person who still beats him senseless.  The main characters aren’t especially interesting, and they’re stuck in a random events plot.  Granted, the random tribes they encounter can be interesting, but the events don’t feel like they add up to anything until they suddenly do.  I’m also expected to, if not forgive, forget a few bad things from goodbeasts, one case specifically and in one case because they’re showing up to beat the bad guy.  The story doesn’t do anything especially painful, it just doesn’t do a whole lot of anything especially good.

 

14. Lord Brocktree: OK, just up front, this book should be named Dottie.  I know Lord Brocktree’s the focal character, but Dottie’s the more interesting and dynamic character and Salamandastron and The Long Patrol were both taken.  It starts off kinda’ indecisive.  On the one hand, Salamandastron is conquered (off-screen), on the other, the heroes are kind of unbeatable.  They fight a pike and it maybe makes them catch their breath a bit (for those who don’t know, Cluny was tough because he only lost an eye to a pike when he defeated it).  On top of that, there’s a dibbun in the picture that can be cloying and one of the characters we see a lot of has a name that made me roll my eyes and go ‘really?’  You’ll know him when you see him.  It finally starts to get interesting in the middle, though, and the ending’s alright.  There’s also a romantic subplot with Dottie that has a premise I really have to use sometime.

 

13. Salamandastron: It’s alright.  That’s most of what I remember.  The characters aren’t really very memorable (and they do a few things that made me wince) and it uses a plotline that’s completely disconnected from the rest of the story, but it does a few interesting things.  It has the first case of vermin who were actually vermin trying to turn good in Thura and Dingeye.  It has the abbey having to deal with a plague, which is pretty effective.  It’s got a decently funny pair-up of father and son villains.  It’s even got an interesting action setpiece or two.  But it doesn’t have a whole lot else, or anything that really sparkles.

 

12. The Sable Quean: Oh, this is going to be fun to explain.  Let me just say, there’s a lot in this book to like.  It’s got several interesting characters, including deeper vermin characters, and it was nice to return to a place mentioned previously.  Best of all was the villain, who was actually really interesting, somewhat effective, but she does something not a lot of villains do and I think she does it really well (no joke, it’s one of my favorite moments in the series for how effective I think it is).  Plus, we get a lot of buildup where the main characters are on the back foot… which all gets undone in almost a parade of deus-ex-machinas and one outright continuity error.  Plus, I think this is the story where the plot is the most overtly… bigoted. Seriously, it flat out says ‘the only good vermin is a dead vermin’ in the place of a moral, which was being said by a whole faction of the good guys and it feels like I’m being expected to just shrug and accept this.  Finally, it’s got Diggs, Flib, and Tragedia, three characters I was consistently annoyed or disturbed by.  If it weren’t for the good points in this book, it’d be even lower on the list.  As is, though, its peaks are high, but that makes its valleys feel all the lower.

 

11. The Long Patrol: This had two interesting plotlines.  The first was the plot of what’s going wrong with the abbey wall, which is sinking into the ground and leads to a nice exploration plot that’s a nice bonus for the continuity-minded (if a little strange).  The second is the first really original hare since Basil Stag Hare: Tammo.  His story’s about him wanting to join the eponymous Long Patrol and him discovering just what that means.  It doesn’t do a whole lot of sugar-coating either: he finds out firsthand (well, paw) just what it means to take a life and he doesn’t take well to it.  He doesn’t wash out, but it still effects him.  Overall, it was fun to read.  If only the villain wasn’t so bland I only recently remembered his name.

 

10. The Rogue Crew: I wanted to be nice to this because of the conditions of its release (Jacques had died right after finishing it), but I didn’t have to.  While the Rogue Crew are… brutal, there are other characters to keep their worst excesses in check.  On top of it, Razzid is a very effective villain despite his shaky introduction (and a headshaking deus ex machina).  The landsailing is a little weird, though.  It apparently happened a long time ago, but I'm not sure that's how it worked.  Lastly, the characters are pretty decent, even if there are quite a few of them.  A nice note to go out on.


09. The Pearls of Lutra: OK, the main characters are about as interesting as sawdust even by this point in the series and baddies fall before them like cards, but that’s really the only problem I have with this book.  The main plot with the pearls actually goes in an interesting direction, but there’s also an interesting plot thread with the goings-on before the heroes show up.  This really lets the villains show what they’re made of.  Plus, it has my favorite bad guy, Ublaz, who’s got an interesting gimmick of his own and is actually pretty tough.  All-in-all, quite interesting.

 

08. Marlfox: This was actually a nice departure from the norm.  Barring their quite frankly embarrassing introduction, the titular Marlfoxes are actually surprisingly effective as Redwall villains go, and their underlings are an interesting look (well, peek) at a villain who doesn’t really want to be a villain.  There’s also some bad behavior from goodbeasts that’s not given any kind of excuse (though there is some that is).  There’s a deus ex machina near the end, but the actual ending is one of the most interesting in the series.
 

07. The Bellmaker: This is an odd story broken into three parts.  One feels underdeveloped and one’s decently tense barring a deus ex machina, and both are married to an embarrassing villain.  The third, though, about a vermin finding himself at home in Redwall, is excellent.  Blaggut is one of my favorite characters for a reason, and his plot of self-realization is simply masterful.  If that were the whole book, this would definitely be number one on the list.  Unfortunately, the other two just can’t keep pace with it.

 

06. The Legend of Luke: Again, this is mainly for one particular plotline.  For the first half of the book and the last five chapters, it’s an entirely different and disconnected story, one much like Martin the Warrior.  For the most part, it’s a set of by-the-book random encounters, barring one very disturbing scene from an otter that I’m asked to forgive because vermin happened to him or something (I didn’t; it was technically victimless but still firmly villainous behavior).  At the halfway point, though?  Something entirely different that I actually really enjoyed, the story of Martin’s father Luke.  This story’s actually pretty compelling, with a character I sympathize with, a cast that earns the breaks it gets, and a climax that hits all the right notes.  If only it weren’t stuck to the Martin story.

 

05. Eulalia!: This was a nice change of pace, somewhat.  Something interesting is that all of the focus characters are flawed: one’s a badger with a bad case of the bloodwrath, one’s a hedgehog with kleptomania, one’s a hare who’s about to be drummed out of the Long Patrol.  However, while they do change as characters, it’s front-loaded two times out of three and sort of handwaved the other time.  Likewise, the villains are pretty decent and allowed to be effective on multiple occasions, even if they get crimped several times.  The most annoying part for me, though, was the Tabura, who’s this fawned-over character who’s supposedly been very important to the world for a long time but which we haven’t seen in eighteen books and (by my estimation) about 300 years.  Still, it was an enjoyable read.

 

04. Redwall: Yep, it’s the classic.  Yep, it’s down here (or rather, ‘down’ here).  I really don’t hate it: it fleshes out its world in a magnificent manner, Matthias is a good lead character who meets some very interesting people along his journey, and nothing’s really very wrong with the book that sets up most everything.  It’s a good, solid story.  However, I think later books did a few things better, such as main villains (you have to admit, Cluny really has a low bar to climb) and its characters aren’t quite as fascinating as other books.  Still, it’s a classic for a reason.

 

03. Rakkety Tam:  Part of this may have been the three-hour car ride I had to read it on, but I found it surprisingly hard to put this book down.  Gulo the Savage is an amazing villain, and easily one if not THE most effective in the series.  Even when the switch flips, he’s still capable of kicking butts and taking names even up to the final battle.  There are a few problems, though.  His gimmick is… not for the faint of heart, especially when Jacques describes it just enough for you to see too much (though he is at least trying to be sparing).  In addition, there’s this one character who’s a thief who can get pretty annoying.  However, I still enjoyed reading it, even if I’d lay off on the Redwall sieges by now (this one started OK but turned kinda’ ridiculous).

 

02. Mariel of Redwall: If I were to pick the most ‘adult’ Redwall book, this would be it, and I don’t mean that in a Family Guy kind of way.  I mean this is one of the most thought-out and mature books in the series.  Whole plots revolve around the technology in the area, the heroes are actually put into peril several times throughout the book, and the main villain, Gabool the Wild, is really quite… fascinating.  It could be deeper and the ending was a bit of a letdown, but I was satisfied with what I got.

 

01. Mattimeo: Everything Redwall did, I think this book improved on.  The villain is more effective and a little more memorable.  The heroes are put through their paces and (bar one moment at the end) their victories seem earned.  It’s got a great sense of wonder at the unknown regions the characters travel to.  It even has a character arc for the title character.  I’m kind of sad this is all we see of Mattimeo, but I’m glad I got this at least.

So there's my ranking.  What do you think of all of them?  How many have you read?  Leave a comment down below and see who thinks you've got a point!  Just keep it civil.  Now, though, I have to get back to Redwall and record my introduction.  So, you guys have fun.

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:iconmacgyver644200:
Macgyver644200 Featured By Owner Feb 8, 2019  Hobbyist Writer
You're welcome.
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:iconjessica-rae-3:
Jessica-Rae-3 Featured By Owner Dec 18, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
Hippity Happity Birthday! Bunny bored Bunny Bunny Emoji-11 (Drum Roll) [V1] Bunny Drought 16 It Was At This Moment Bunny Knew: He Bucked Up 
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:iconmacgyver644200:
Macgyver644200 Featured By Owner Dec 18, 2018  Hobbyist Writer
Thankee thankee kindly!
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:icondinobirdy:
DinoBirdy Featured By Owner Dec 18, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
Happy Birthday!
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:iconmacgyver644200:
Macgyver644200 Featured By Owner Dec 18, 2018  Hobbyist Writer
Thanks!
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:icondinobirdy:
DinoBirdy Featured By Owner Dec 18, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
You’re welcome
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:iconkicia555:
kicia555 Featured By Owner Dec 6, 2018
Thanks for the + llama emoticon  and the Added to my devWatch! !
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:iconmacgyver644200:
Macgyver644200 Featured By Owner Dec 6, 2018  Hobbyist Writer
You're welcome!  Thanks for the photographs!
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:iconamen95:
amen95 Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2018  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Hello. :)
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