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The misty moor by LordLJCornellPhotos The misty moor by LordLJCornellPhotos
Dartmoor ponies out on a misty moor doing what they do best......eating. These tough little ponies live wild on the moor all year round. There are currently probably fewer than 3,000 ponies on Dartmoor. In 1950 there were about 30,000. 
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:iconnehab16:
nehab16 Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2017  Professional Traditional Artist
sweet 
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:iconlordljcornellphotos:
LordLJCornellPhotos Featured By Owner Mar 14, 2017  Hobbyist Photographer
Thank you Neha :)
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:iconmiarath:
Miarath Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2017   General Artist
Wonderful scene with lots of atmosphere here. :love:
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:iconlordljcornellphotos:
LordLJCornellPhotos Featured By Owner Mar 14, 2017  Hobbyist Photographer
Thank you Mia :)
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:iconmiarath:
Miarath Featured By Owner Apr 7, 2017   General Artist
Very welcome. :heart:
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:iconmorgan-lou:
Morgan-Lou Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2017  Professional Photographer
Very nice capture :love:
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:iconlordljcornellphotos:
LordLJCornellPhotos Featured By Owner Mar 14, 2017  Hobbyist Photographer
Thank you very much :hug:
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:iconflamingcold:
Flamingcold Featured By Owner Mar 7, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
You have got me interested in these little ponies. Beautiful image with the fog and all too. 
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:iconlordljcornellphotos:
LordLJCornellPhotos Featured By Owner Mar 14, 2017  Hobbyist Photographer
Thank you :)
they are amazing animals :)
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:iconeegarim:
eegariM Featured By Owner Mar 6, 2017
That's sad to hear. What's the reason for the decline in numbers?
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:iconlordljcornellphotos:
LordLJCornellPhotos Featured By Owner Mar 6, 2017  Hobbyist Photographer
Well it's kind of sad but also it's not.
The main two reasons for the drop in numbers is that there is no demand for them as Pit Ponies anymore (working at the mines)
and also there is no demand for pony meat anymore.
Although they live wild on the moor they are owned by farmers and, once a year they are rounded up and some are sold.
These days they are used for nicer reasons like riding for the handicapped children etc. 
I'm sure they would be happier out on the moor but at least they are cared for. 
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:iconeegarim:
eegariM Featured By Owner Mar 7, 2017
Oh, isn't Dartmoor a national park? I would have thought those are actually wild ponies. Well, in this case I guess the decline in numbers is not necessarily a bad thing. Thanks for detailed answer Lawrence. :)
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:iconlordljcornellphotos:
LordLJCornellPhotos Featured By Owner Mar 7, 2017  Hobbyist Photographer
Yes it is a National Park but they are wild ponies. They don't receive any attention from the farmers during the year. 
They just get rounded up once a year and then decisions are made about their future. Otherwise they are just left to 
fend for themselves. 
Naturally, they have worked out that visitors to the park will feed them if they hang around the main car parks looking cute 
but the park has strict guidelines where no feeding is allowed. They always try to minimise contact between the ponies and humans. 
Generally they do a good job and it works well. 
I like to find the ponies in their own habitat and will spend a lot of time looking for them and just spending time around them so they get used to me 
before I start taking pictures. I don't want to stress them at all. 
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:iconeegarim:
eegariM Featured By Owner Mar 7, 2017
Ok, somehow the definition of a national park is very vague and is not the same across all nations. Generally, animal population can only be regulated (by hunting) if it's to retain the original state of the ecosystem before humans messed it up. For example, in germany they hunt to reduce the numbers of red-deers around because there aren't natural enemies (bears, wolves...) anymore. I would have thought that selling those animals is prohibited in national parks.
Well, at least they can mostly roam freely until they are sold. The measures put in place by the national park seems to be decent as well.
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:iconlordljcornellphotos:
LordLJCornellPhotos Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2017  Hobbyist Photographer
The way we regulate our National Parks in England is very different to...say... America.
We are currently re-introducing a lot of native species to the UK such as Otters and Red Kites
which is causing some friction with farmers across the land as they claim to be losing livestock and fish.
It's all a balancing act and some control is required. 
Hunting is allowed of certain animals such as deer but only in seasons that are strictly adhered to.
In Dartmoor National Park there are privately owned farms and rented farms. If you want to farm in the park 
there are rules you have to follow as they try to protect the area from over development or too much modernisation
but they also realise these farmers have to be able to make a living. Again......it is a balancing act and compromises
have to be made on both sides. 
They are free to sell their own animals because they are proper farms that have to earn a living to exist.
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:iconeegarim:
eegariM Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2017
Yeah, we have the same problem here, but with wolves (a few came back to germany for whatever reason), and farmers are losing some livestock or the livestock scatters kilometers across the landscape and the farmers have to find them and bring them back. It's a difficult situation indeed. Civilisation shouldn't have grown to be as thick in the first but now that it has it's hard to hand some of the land back to mother nature. In america, especially Canada, it's quite a bit easier because of the lower population as well as natives that are close to nature and help with the reservation.
I think european countries should be aiming to abide by the rules set for national parks internationally. However, that has to be done at a very slow pace over decades because it requires, like you mentioned, a lot of compromises.
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:iconjosephvinegar:
JosephVinegar Featured By Owner Mar 5, 2017  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Pretty cold out, I'd assume, Captured the scene perfectly.
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:iconlordljcornellphotos:
LordLJCornellPhotos Featured By Owner Mar 14, 2017  Hobbyist Photographer
Thank you kindly :)
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:iconeyeofthekat:
EyeOfTheKat Featured By Owner Mar 5, 2017  Hobbyist Photographer
:wow: I did not know there where wild ponies in Britain. You seem to be quite close - are they not shy? :love:
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:iconlordljcornellphotos:
LordLJCornellPhotos Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2017  Hobbyist Photographer
There are some places where there are wild ponies or horses in the UK
On Dartmoor, where these ones are, they can be quite friendly. I am very quiet and I move slowly when I find some ponies.
I don't hurry to take pictures. I take my time so they are calm and happy for me to be there.
Then some of them get very curious
Wearing my heart on my nose by LordLJCornellPhotos

It is amazing how close you can be to them
I often can stroke them or let them smell my hand 
Only one has tried to kick me but it was a reminder to treat them with respect and to be careful around them.
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:iconeyeofthekat:
EyeOfTheKat Featured By Owner Mar 13, 2017  Hobbyist Photographer
That is amazing. I think I have found something more for my bucket list! :aww: :love:
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:iconlordljcornellphotos:
LordLJCornellPhotos Featured By Owner Mar 14, 2017  Hobbyist Photographer
It is a lovely place.
Like Scotland though, it can rain a lot there :)
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:iconeyeofthekat:
EyeOfTheKat Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2017  Hobbyist Photographer
:-)
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:icon4ajka:
4ajka Featured By Owner Mar 5, 2017
great ponies!:D (Big Grin) 
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:iconlordljcornellphotos:
LordLJCornellPhotos Featured By Owner Mar 14, 2017  Hobbyist Photographer
Thank you Lara :hug:

they are lovely :)
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:iconfiograph:
Fiograph Featured By Owner Mar 5, 2017  Hobbyist Photographer
I loved meeting one of them when we visited Dartmoor.  They look so calm :)
Lovely photo! :hug:
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:iconlordljcornellphotos:
LordLJCornellPhotos Featured By Owner Mar 14, 2017  Hobbyist Photographer
Thank you dear Fio :hug:
yes, many of them are very friendly :)
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:iconfiograph:
Fiograph Featured By Owner Mar 15, 2017  Hobbyist Photographer
:hug:
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:iconime54-art:
IME54-ART Featured By Owner Mar 5, 2017   General Artist
No words dear❤ Image by IlonavanderWeyden  
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:iconlordljcornellphotos:
LordLJCornellPhotos Featured By Owner Mar 14, 2017  Hobbyist Photographer
:D :hug:
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:iconime54-art:
IME54-ART Featured By Owner Mar 14, 2017   General Artist
🌺🌺🌺❤
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:iconjav1966:
JAV1966 Featured By Owner Mar 5, 2017
This is such a beautiful scene. It's very sad there has been such a dramatic drop in the population of these beautiful creatures and I hope that there is a reversal of whatever is causing this decline.
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:iconlordljcornellphotos:
LordLJCornellPhotos Featured By Owner Mar 6, 2017  Hobbyist Photographer
The main two reasons for the drop in numbers is that there is no demand for them as Pit Ponies anymore (working at the mines)
and also there is no demand for pony meat anymore.
Although they live wild on the moor they are owned by farmers and, once a year they are rounded up and some are sold.
These days they are used mainly for nicer reasons like riding for the handicapped children etc. 
I'm sure they would be happier out on the moor but at least they are cared for. 
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:iconjav1966:
JAV1966 Featured By Owner Mar 6, 2017
I understand. At least they are being taken care of & monitored. I appreciate the information.
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:icontrippy4u:
Trippy4U Featured By Owner Mar 5, 2017
Wonderful photograph and title :thumbsup:
What has caused the severe population drop?
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:iconlordljcornellphotos:
LordLJCornellPhotos Featured By Owner Mar 6, 2017  Hobbyist Photographer
Well it's kind of sad but also it's not.
The main two reasons for the drop in numbers is that there is no demand for them as Pit Ponies anymore (working at the mines)
and also there is no demand for pony meat anymore.
Although they live wild on the moor they are owned by farmers and, once a year they are rounded up and some are sold.
These days they are mainly used for nicer reasons like riding for the handicapped children etc.
I'm sure they would be happier out on the moor but at least they are cared for. 
(I assume some still go for meat though)
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:icontrippy4u:
Trippy4U Featured By Owner Mar 6, 2017
Hmm...but those reason would make me think that their number should be increasing since no one is killing them.
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:iconlordljcornellphotos:
LordLJCornellPhotos Featured By Owner Mar 6, 2017  Hobbyist Photographer
But they only had them in such numbers because they needed them
It is a supply and demand situation
Not that there is any cost in having them living wild on the moor but
I can only think they are controlling the numbers as there is no demand for them
in a business sense
They are very good for dartmoor national park as visitors love to see them 
but from a business point of view they have run their course
I am just happy they are still keeping a healthy number of them out there
I know I love mountains and Skye and Scotland and landscapes but it 
really is an almost spiritual experience to go to dartmoor and spend time
out on that desolate land with a bunch of wild ponies 
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:icontrippy4u:
Trippy4U Featured By Owner Mar 6, 2017
Ahh I see....so "humanely" they are indeed "culling" the herd.
Yes...that certainly must be a spiritual experience and thankfully they still exist for people to share that.
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:icondarkstripeshadowpaw:
DarkstripeShadowpaw Featured By Owner Mar 5, 2017
One misty, moisty morning
When cloudy was the weather...
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:iconlordljcornellphotos:
LordLJCornellPhotos Featured By Owner Mar 14, 2017  Hobbyist Photographer
:D 
:clap:
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:iconmoonflowersax:
MoonFlowerSax Featured By Owner Mar 5, 2017  Hobbyist General Artist
Moon Flower snerks.
Well, it's their digestive system which needs to be filled constantly without too long breaks.
Did you know that if you have a horse that they may get really upset if they get their food 15 minutes too late?
Quite sensitive digestive system.
And if they live as wild animals they don't have the problem being relied on us pesty humans. :D

:+fav:
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:iconlordljcornellphotos:
LordLJCornellPhotos Featured By Owner Mar 14, 2017  Hobbyist Photographer
They do have plenty of food out on the moor which is very good :)
They can eat to their hearts' content :)
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Submitted on
March 5, 2017
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