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  • Listening to: Audio books
  • Reading: Doctor Who Magazine
  • Watching: Boring TV
  • Playing: with danger.
  • Eating: Home cooked
  • Drinking: Soda pop
Goblin1 by Loneanimator

For those of you interested in how the puppets were made for this project, here's a documentation over at my blog:

loneanimator.blogspot.com/2018…
  • Listening to: Audio books
  • Reading: Doctor Who Magazine
  • Watching: Boring TV
  • Playing: with danger.
  • Eating: Home cooked
  • Drinking: Soda pop


A short animation I made, based on Harold Monro's poem of the same name.
  • Listening to: Genesis
  • Reading: A book about scifi comics
  • Watching: Boring TV
  • Playing: with danger.
  • Eating: Home cooked
  • Drinking: Soda pop


HUBLERDON :iconhublerdon:,my DA pal, asked me to post this film, so here it is :) 
Due to various technical issues and some problems during the filming, it's not as polished as I wished it would be, but I hope you'll enjoy it nevertheless. Since all dialogue is in Swedish, it's subtitled in English. Both actors, Andreas and Joakim, have slight mental and physical disabilities, and our intention is that this film will initiate more films made by a group of special needs people, which we are now starting up.
  • Listening to: Foghat
  • Reading: A book about scifi comics
  • Watching: Ingmar Bergman movies
  • Playing: with danger.
  • Eating: Home cooked
  • Drinking: Soda pop


A while back I was interviewed by Swedish TV about my stop-motion projects. Here's a subtitled (in English) version of that segment. It took quite a while to get the material from the producer, and the stuff I got isn't top notch quality, but I hope you'll still enjoy it.
  • Listening to: Podcasts
  • Reading: Doctor Who Magazine
  • Watching: Star Trek
  • Playing: with danger.
  • Eating: Home cooked
  • Drinking: Water


If you're interested in it, my puppet book is finally out. It's on Indyplanet for $20.50.
You can find it here: www.indyplanet.us/comics/15807…
  • Listening to: Podcasts
  • Reading: Doctor Who Magazine
  • Watching: Star Trek
  • Playing: with danger.
  • Eating: Home cooked
  • Drinking: Water
Bcker by Loneanimator
Sean Connery once described the worst parts of working as an actor as "shovelling shit uphill." Well, that analogy can encompass most creative work, especially when taking that finished work out into the world and trying to find appreciation for it, or worse -trying to make money off of it.

About a couple of decades ago now, the self-publishing business was booming, and some authors even managed to become successful. I thought I'd give it a go and wrote a collection of local folktales with a pal of mine. We found it impossible to get funding to publish it through any museums or publishing companies, since we weren't academics. But a family inheritance left with me some disposable funds, and I paid for the publishing of the book via a self-publishing company in Sweden. It turned out that they were connected with schools and libraries, so our book sold very well to various institutions, ironically some of those that initially gave us the thumbs down. I followed up this book project with another title in Swedish describing folkloric creatures from all over the world.

These two books sold well during their very first year of being published, but interest then waned very quickly. To get them published I had to put up a sum of (the equivalent of) a few hundred dollars to get the process going, but after that the books have been cost free. I wanted to explore the international self-publishing market. After all, that was apparently where all the success and money could be found, if you were lucky. After lots of research I settled on Lulu as my publishing service of choice, mostly because of their very easy to use manuscript file uploading technology. I published two books in quick succession, one about the "Fearsome Critters" of cowboy and lumberjack lore, and a collection of classic nonsense poetry, with a few original contributions thrown in. Both books were lavishly illustrated, and in a slightly unconventional format. They were labors of love, and I hoped that I could find an audience for them. I quickly found out two things; the formats prevented the books from being retailed via any avenues Lulu had outside their own online store, and that it really didn't matter because nobody gave a shit. No amount of plugging on forums and other online hangouts for artists and authors whipped up any interest at all. 

A few years ago I self-published another labor of love over at Lulu, this time a book about freaky stories from traditional Swedish folklore. I posted some info about this book on DeviantArt and Facebook, and lo; this time I actually sold a few copies. However, when I checked my revenues on Lulu I discovered that while the copies were registered as sold, my revenues were held back. Inquiring Lulu why this was I got no reply at all. After a few weeks I simply gave up trying to get my money. When I googled some reviews about Lulu's services I found that my experience was far from isolated. Apparently a lot of people had been screwed over royally by Lulu, who sometimes happily collected the revenues without paying out anything to the authors. Of course, this prompted me to turn my back at Lulu and look for another publishing solution.  

A friend of mine in the US had used Ka-Blam publishing for a couple of his books, and recommended them. My big problem has always been that as a Swedish citizen, I have certain restrictions as a self-publisher. The most successful self-published books and ebooks can be found over at Amazon, but they only do payouts to bank accounts in their respective countries. There is no such service for Sweden (or Scandinavia, period). The other option is to wait until I earn $100, for which Amazon will issue a cheque. But that sum will be partially eaten away by fees both on Amazon and in the Swedish banking system. I needed to find a publishing service that used PayPal for their revenue payouts, and that wouldn't steal from me. 

I wanted to publish a book which essentially was a gallery showing the best of my stop-motion puppets, with some info texts. Ka-Blam turned out to have a very helpful staff that corrected my various mistakes, and the printing quality was excellent, with vivid colors, crisp details and sturdy paper. However, their uploading options were anything but smooth, being very restricted in the file size of PDF used for the printing. Ka-Blam specializes in comic book projects, which may be fine if it's a magazine. But if you want to publish a graphic novel or (as in my case) a photo book, then you're in trouble. The other option is to upload each page as a separate TIFF file, which would take the whole day if your book has some volume. The staff solved this by allowing me to upload a folder with all the TIFFs on Dropbox, and sending them a link to it. As I said, the finished book looks great, but the actual publishing process is a slow one. While on Lulu my book was published the second I hit send on the upload, Ka-Blam takes their good month or so. In other words, if you're attending a convention with your books, make sure you put in your order well ahead of time. Also, unlike Lulu, Ka-Blam does not have a storefront. That's a separate web page, IndyPlanet, but it seems to be run by the same over-worked staff you find at Ka-Blam. To have my book published so it can be sold, IndyPlanet will look through it, making sure I'm not breaching any copyrights, for example including trademarked characters. I also have to send in a tax form. After having waited over a month for my puppet book to be published, and hearing nothing, I contacted Ka-Blam and found out they never got my tax form. So I have started the process all over again. Apparently, due to the high number of submissions, the average wait for your title to be reviewed is 4-6 weeks. At this point in time my puppet book as an IndyPlanet title hangs in limbo, and I'm still waiting for three printed copies, to be used as hand-outs, that are now over a month delayed.

With all the marketing options allowed by the free social media, and the various publishing service online, is it a good idea to get your books out there? Well, that depends, I'd say. If you only do it to tickle your ego, and thrill at the idea of having your own book on the shelf, then by all means; go ahead. But a few things have become very apparent to me: 1. It can be incredibly complicated and patience-taxing going through the motions with your publishing tool of choice. 2. The people you hope will buy your books online couldn't care less. With that in mind, you can still get a stock of books printed, which you can then market and sell yourself at various conventions and festivals.

I still have ideas for comics and books I'd like to do, but I'm hesitant to go ahead with any new projects, due to the amount of shit-shovelling I'll have to do.
  • Listening to: Podcasts
  • Reading: Shakespeare's The Tempest
  • Watching: Star Trek
  • Playing: with danger.
  • Eating: Home cooked
  • Drinking: Water
I'd like to hear what your experience is in this matter, but here's mine.
I've grown weary of Facebook. Whenever I post a bit of art there, some people add a like, but hardly ever comment on it. Here on DeviantArt I almost always get posted replies that lead to interesting discussions, or at least duels in clever punning. Nor do any of my Facebook posts go anywhere. They just sit on my own Facebook page, and they never lead to any opportunities, or any new and interesting contacts. I frequently find my DA posts popping up in Google image searches, and a few times I've been contacted by people who want to use my art (and pay for it) because they found it posted on DA.

The only reason I'm still on Facebook is because I'm managing an account for my dayjob, and I'm currently involved in a project that will probably necessitate the use of a Facebook group.
  • Listening to: Podcasts
  • Reading: Old movie magazines
  • Watching: Bela Lugosi movies
  • Playing: with danger.
  • Eating: Home cooked
  • Drinking: Water
  • Listening to: Podcasts
  • Reading: Comics
  • Watching: BBC Charles Dickens adaptations
  • Playing: with danger.
  • Eating: Home cooked
  • Drinking: Water


H P Lovecraft and I wish all of my DeviantArt buddies a very Happy New Year!
  • Listening to: Podcasts
  • Reading: Comics
  • Watching: Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell
  • Playing: with danger.
  • Eating: Home cooked
  • Drinking: Water


Hi gang! Here's a Dungeons & Dragons-inspired fan film that I've been working on for quite a while.
  • Listening to: Podcasts
  • Reading: Comics
  • Watching: Star Trek: DS9
  • Playing: with danger.
  • Eating: Home cooked
  • Drinking: Water
Quite a number of people over the years have bugged me about why I'm not making a Halloween YouTube video -so, here is one!

  • Listening to: Podcasts
  • Reading: A book about Star Trek TOS first season
  • Watching: Shit on TV
  • Playing: with danger.
  • Eating: Home cooked
  • Drinking: Water


A vlog about my passion for H P Lovecraft's stories, my films based on his tales and a bit about the man himself.
Support my YouTube channel: www.patreon.com/LoneAnimator
  • Listening to: Podcasts
  • Reading: A book about Star Trek TOS first season
  • Watching: The Frankenstein Chronicles
  • Playing: with danger.
  • Eating: Home cooked
  • Drinking: Water
Here's a little info video I made, about a material I've found very useful.

  • Listening to: Podcasts
  • Reading: A book about Star Trek TOS first season
  • Watching: The Frankenstein Chronicles
  • Playing: with danger.
  • Eating: Home cooked
  • Drinking: Water
Finished this the other day :)

  • Listening to: Podcasts
  • Reading: Short stories
  • Watching: The Baby Cart To Hell series of films.
  • Playing: with danger.
  • Eating: Home cooked
  • Drinking: Water


For a few years now I've been illustrating a Swedish fantasy role-playing game aimed at kids. This little video shows parts of me making the cover for our new rule book. The image is drawn with a Tombow soft point Fudenosuko brush pen and a Pilot pocket brush pen, and colored in Photoshop.
  • Listening to: Podcasts
  • Reading: Comics
  • Watching: Bad and good movies
  • Playing: with danger.
  • Eating: Home cooked
  • Drinking: Water


My first vlog! More will be coming on various subjects:)
  • Listening to: Podcasts
  • Reading: Comics
  • Watching: Bad and good movies
  • Playing: with danger.
  • Eating: Home cooked
  • Drinking: Water
Remember the Star Trek: Next Generation episode 'Darmok?' Here's my little stop-motion animation tribute to it.

  • Listening to: Podcasts
  • Reading: Comics
  • Watching: Bad and good movies
  • Playing: with danger.
  • Eating: Home cooked
  • Drinking: Water
May Prizes Youtube by Loneanimator

This month I'm starting a monthly quiz over at my Patreon campaign. Each month you'll have the chance to win either a stop-motion puppet as the grand prize, or a selection of latex castings from my puppets as a second prize, or a bunch of sculpting texture stamps as a third. Please consider joining me as a Patreon supporter or tell anyone who might be interested about it. Thanks! 
:) 
www.patreon.com/LoneAnimator
  • Listening to: Podcasts
  • Reading: Thongor and the Wizard of Lemuria
  • Watching: BBC's Ghost Stories For Christmas
  • Playing: with danger.
  • Eating: Home cooked
  • Drinking: Water
Ptero13 by Loneanimator

Read all about it over at my blog:

loneanimator.blogspot.se/2016/…
  • Listening to: Podcasts
  • Reading: Thongor and the Wizard of Lemuria
  • Watching: BBC's Ghost Stories For Christmas
  • Playing: with danger.
  • Eating: Home cooked
  • Drinking: Water