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Hero of the Crystal Empire by liamwhite1 Hero of the Crystal Empire by liamwhite1
SVG: sta.sh/0gtqva6kx2x

Look, I'm on EqD! www.equestriadaily.com/2014/05…

Have you ever seen this before? db.tt/Tt3w8wgv

:icongouseplz::iconthisartplz:
:iconccwelcomedplz1::iconccwelcomedplz2:
Parody Logo by liamwhite1
:iconadobeai-plz: (yes, really)
If you use portions or all of this vector in other vector artworks, you MUST provide the link to your source vector for any of your artwork that includes my work. (what?)
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:iconthecartoonwizard:
TheCartoonWizard Featured By Owner Jun 7, 2017  Hobbyist Artist
I always thought Spike would be living in Twilight's shadow but I'm glad he got to be a hero
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:icondasprid:
dasprid Featured By Owner May 12, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
You should update this based on the season finale where you can see the entire tail.
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:iconringsandamiss007:
ringsandamiss007 Featured By Owner May 10, 2014
Biggest ego of the baby dragon ever!!!
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:icondecimix:
Decimix Featured By Owner May 5, 2014
Every object seems to be aligned perfectly with objects adjacent to them... impressive. I can definitely see why you didn't want to layer this one, but did your method actually save you much time?
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:iconliamwhite1:
liamwhite1 Featured By Owner May 5, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yeah, it sure did. I turned on "Snap to Cusp Nodes" (either on the side or on the top, depending on your layout) and then the pen will simply....well, snap to cusp nodes! =P
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:icondecimix:
Decimix Featured By Owner May 5, 2014
I should really play around with Inkscape more often. Features like these could be so useful at times, yet when you haven't heard about them before you don't think to look for them.
*adds finding out what every button does to a list of things to do*
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:iconliamwhite1:
liamwhite1 Featured By Owner May 6, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Also try every path effect.
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:icongretsch1962:
Gretsch1962 Featured By Owner May 4, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
that must have been pretty tough to vector 0_0 great job!
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:iconliamwhite1:
liamwhite1 Featured By Owner May 4, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Nah, it was pretty easy, despite me thinking it was going to be hard :XD:
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:icongretsch1962:
Gretsch1962 Featured By Owner May 4, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I notice that the vector has no curves. (which are hard to do) So I guess it must have been pretty easy
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:iconliamwhite1:
liamwhite1 Featured By Owner May 5, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
There are hundreds of curves in this picture, but you don't see anything.....
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:icongretsch1962:
Gretsch1962 Featured By Owner May 5, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
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:icondasprid:
dasprid Featured By Owner May 5, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Nah, curves wouldn't have made it really harder.
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:icongretsch1962:
Gretsch1962 Featured By Owner May 5, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I have a lot to learn in terms of venturing screenshots.
Reply
:iconfallenshadow000:
FallenShadow000 Featured By Owner May 4, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Hey, do you happen to have a tutorial for Inkscape? I have it, and want to use it to make a custom watermark.
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:iconliamwhite1:
liamwhite1 Featured By Owner May 4, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Reply
:iconfallenshadow000:
FallenShadow000 Featured By Owner May 4, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Much obliged! :TipOfTheHat: 
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:iconaceblazewing:
AceBlazewing Featured By Owner May 4, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
:iconmlpspikeplz: Hello, gorgeous...
Reply
:icondoctormo:
doctormo Featured By Owner May 4, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
So which bits did you do in Ai and which bits in Inkscape?
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:iconliamwhite1:
liamwhite1 Featured By Owner May 4, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
The Inkscape bit was 99.99% of it.
The Illustrator portion was because Inkscape is not good at handling lines that are touching but not overlapping — a small line forms between them, and it's fairly annoying. However, with a few modifications, it looks perfect in Illustrator. :)
Reply
:icondervonnebenaan:
dervonnebenaan Featured By Owner May 4, 2014
Oh yes, I had that problem many times before. I was always hoping that there is a nice and sophisticated solution to this, but if even you can't do anything about it... Looks like I'll just have to make underlapping paths like dasprid says.
Reply
:icondoctormo:
doctormo Featured By Owner May 4, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
Interesting, do we have a bug report for the issue? bugs.launchpad.net/inkscape
Reply
:iconazurexiles:
Azurexiles Featured By Owner May 4, 2014
This is just the way Inkscape draws filled polygons on a bitmap canvas, not really a bug. It draws them sequentially with edge antialiasing achieved through alpha-blending the polygon's color with what's already drawn on the canvas.

Let's say you have two polygons, each covering a half of one particular pixel. The first polygon's edge is blended 50/50 with the background, leaving 50% of the background color visible. The next polygon is blended again, and since it also takes up 50% of the pixel's area, the background color is halved again, which still leaves 25% of the background bleeding through. If the two polygons are touching, they should completely obscure the background, but due to Inkscape's method of rendering polygons, some of it remains visible.

The problem could be avoided by simply adding the partial areas the polygons cover to the pixel value instead of alpha-blending them, but it's not that easy. Such a process must be numerically robust in order to avoid overflow (this can be handled in several ways). The polygons must not overlap (overflow again, but now certain, and meaningless values)— this particular problem could be resolved by using boolean operations, namely subtraction and OR: OR the polygon that's just been drawn with the already ORed bunch that was drawn before, subtract this conglomeration from the next one, draw the result, repeat.

Well, as you can see the whole process is computationally quite expensive and ridden with other problems like handling non-solid coloring or mixing plain polygons with objects with some bitmap filter applied to them (blur, for instance). I guess it's not suitable for real-time rendering, but it could be used in export. By the way, about a year ago, when I was still obsessed with programming my own polygon-filling routines, I looked into this very problem, found the flimsy solution I just described, and, with the help of the Clipper library, implemented it in a tiny 2D polygon renderer I wrote in C. It worked… tolerably well. Perhaps there are better solutions.

By the way, you can mitigate this flaw by exporting your drawing at a humongous resolution and then scaling it down.
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:icondoctormo:
doctormo Featured By Owner May 5, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
Wow, er, we need to copy and paste your reply into a bug report and maybe link to your code just for the hell of it. It can't hurt to tie up your experence for anyone else who wants to solve this problem in inkscape.
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:iconazurexiles:
Azurexiles Featured By Owner May 9, 2014
It's just a sketchy summary, though, so here's the whole thing.

Opaque objects obscure everything underneath, but transparent ones must be blended with underlying objects. That sucks, because it gives the algorithm exponential worst-case complexity in both memory requirements and time. It's asymptotically proportional to n * 2^m, where n is the number of opaque objects and m of overlapping transparent ones.
In reality, especially if the user is reasonable, this shouldn't be a common problem, because heaps of wildly overlapping transparent objects are rare. If the polygons don't overlap, then the algorithm's execution time is asymptotically linear.

The algorithm:
Start with a queue or list containing polygon groups and possibly their properties (the color or color function may be useful). They are sorted by their z coordinate (as understood in the field of 2D graphics), where the topmost is the first to go.

create an empty polygon group, denoted by M; and a polygon group container, possibly with other properties such as a stack of color functions (in case the coloring isn't solid)— let's call it A

LOOP:
dequeue the next topmost polygon group and place it in T
calculate the relative complement of M in T and put the result in T: T = T - M = (T XOR M) AND T
if T is empty, skip everything below and go to LOOP
if T is altogether opaque, merge (OR) M and T and put the result in M: M = M OR T

iterate over A:
select the next element in A; we'll refer to it as S
if the bounding rectangles of T and S don't overlap, skip to the next iteration
W = T AND S
if W is empty, then skip to the next iteration
add W to A with the color function properly composed (T is overlaid with S) via the usual transparency blending (this step can be simplified if the coloring is solid)
S = S XOR W (replace the original element in A with this)
T = T XOR W
go to the next iteration; repeat until all the elements in A have been processed except the newly added Ws (they're already disjoint)

if T's color function contains transparency, add it to A
repeat LOOP until the queue is empty

draw everything that is in A
END

That's it. Let's hope it's not ridden with mistakes. If you find any, please, let me know.

Drawing means calculating the area (value range 0–1 — empty–full) of a particular pixel covered by the polygon and adding (not blending) the value to the bitmap. If color channels are used, then the pixel area value is the scalar factor with which the color vector (usually [A, R, G, B]) is scaled before it is added to the bitmap. Even though all of the final polygons are disjoint in theory, rounding errors in polygon boolean operations can cause overlaps and therefore overflow, so that's something to watch out for (hard saturation can be used here).
Similarly, some segments might end up not fitting tightly together, which can lead to marginal unwanted transparency in some pixels of the resulting bitmap. The latter side effect is not noticeable and can be avoided by proper rounding and sufficient precision.

Well, I'm not sure it's worth the effort, but who knows… By the way, I don't think my writing is easily comprehensible, so good luck trying to decipher it.

Anyway, I wouldn't be so hasty with adding this to Inkscape. As I said, it's full of problems and perhaps there's a better way. Perhaps the one Illustrator uses. Man, I'd like to get my hands on Illustrator and see what it can do. Perhaps it's imbued with some powerful magic of the ancient gods that mere mortals can only dream of obtaining. If it can indeed with ease do away with those unsightly seams despite hundreds of overlapping transparent objects interlaced with hundreds of objects with bitmap effects applied to them, then those guys at Adobe truly know divine magic, the magnitude of which reaching beyond my wildest cocaine-fuelled dreams.

I'm curious. Very curious.
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:icondoctormo:
doctormo Featured By Owner May 9, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
bugs.launchpad.net/inkscape/+b… <- bug reported and dup'ed
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:iconliamwhite1:
liamwhite1 Featured By Owner May 4, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
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:iconmrbarthalamul:
MrBarthalamul Featured By Owner May 4, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Nice job! It looks good! I've always been a bit reluctant to making outline-less vectors. It seems like it'd be more difficult to hide the various edges/make them line up correctly. Is is hard to do?

Also, no. I've never gotten that error. Did you fix it or something (seeing as how I'm seeing the picture =p )
Reply
:icondasprid:
dasprid Featured By Owner May 4, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
It's actually quite easy, you snap the nodes together and let the lower paths underlap the higher ones.
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:iconmrbarthalamul:
MrBarthalamul Featured By Owner May 4, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Oh dang! I totally forgot that snapping nodes together was an option! DX The dumb is strong in me.
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:iconliamwhite1:
liamwhite1 Featured By Owner May 4, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
and on Star Wars day too XD
May the fourth be with you, btw
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:iconmrbarthalamul:
MrBarthalamul Featured By Owner May 4, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
lol Intended. :XD: I was going to say "the dumb is strong in this one"... but I didn't want it to seem like I was talking about dasprid =p
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