Permian Paleoart Contest!

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Sure you know all these classic early Permian, north american creatures, Dimetrodon, Edaphosaurus, Eryops. But beyond that there is a rich flora and fauna yet to be explored in paleoart. The Bromacker locality within the Tamback formation is such a case. A new contest just started, with the goal to bring more attention to this lost world and to promote paleoart in general. The contest is linked to a exhibition that will open in March next year, with the best pieces hanging in the exhibition together with famous pieces by Burian for example. The following pictures show some examples of the local fauna.

The locality is mostly known for 4 important discoveries 
The Bromacker locality is mostly known for three things: it's the only locality in the world where tetrapod bones were found together with trace fossils of these animals. Secondly it is home of the oldest bipedal animals we know off, Edibamus, the first man as some would say. The locality also showed how similar and unique at the same time European faunas were compared to North American ones. Lastly it is actually an upland ecosystem that is preserved here, a very rare occasion!

Here the official announcement: www.stiftungfriedenstein.de/si…

And terms and conditions: www.stiftungfriedenstein.de/si…


More information here www.stiftungfriedenstein.de/au…

Please share and consider taking part!

I also put together a little collection of papers that you might find interesting 


Lower Permian Terrestrial Paleoenvironments and Vertebrate Paleoecology of the Tambach Basin (Thuringia, Central Germany): The Upland Holy Grail
www.jstor.org/stable/3515538?s…

The Bromacker quarry - the most important locality of Lower Permian terrestrial vertebrate fossils outside of North America

GEORGENTHALIA CLAVINASICA, A NEW GENUS AND SPECIES OF DISSOROPHOID
TEMNOSPONDYL FROM THE EARLY PERMIAN OF GERMANY, AND THE RELATIONSHIPS
OF THE FAMILY AMPHIBAMIDAE

Rotaryus gothae, a New Trematopid (Temnospondyli: Dissorophoidea) from the Lower Permian of Central Germany

An ostodolepid ‘microsaur’ (Lepospondyli) from the Lower Permian Tambach Formation of central Germany

Redescription of Seymouria sanjuanensis (Seymouriamorpha) from the Lower Permian of Germany based on complete, mature specimens with a discussion of paleoecology of the Bromacker locality assemblage

A RARE EXAMPLE OF ICHNIOTHERIUM (POHLIG, 1892) WITH BODY/TAIL
IMPRESSION FROM THE EARLY PERMIAN BROMACKER LOCALITY OF GERMANY

A new captorhinomorph reptile from the rotliegend of thuringia (Lower Permian; eastern Germany)

The postcranial remains of a juvenile seymouriamorph tetrapod from the Lower Permian Rotliegend of the Tambach Formation of central Germany

COMPARISON OF CRANIAL ANATOMY AND PROPORTIONS OF SIMILARLY SIZED SEYMOURIA
SANJUANENSIS AND DISCOSAURISCUS AUSTRIACUS

A new species of Dimetrodon (Synapsida:
Sphenacodontidae) from the Lower Permian of
Germany records first occurrence of genus
outside of North America
citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/…

A documentary on the locality 

Published:
© 2019 - 2020 Hyrotrioskjan
Comments21
anonymous's avatar
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tuomaskoivurinne's avatar
tuomaskoivurinne Traditional Artist
My interest towards this contest grows.
I hope to find some time to paint something...
Hyrotrioskjan's avatar
HyrotrioskjanProfessional General Artist
Nice! Would be very cool =)
ropen7789's avatar
ropen7789Student Traditional Artist
Also, even if living in an arid environment, would it be outside of the realm of possibility to intemperate Dimetrodon teutonis, the smallest out of the species, to be more vividly colored? I know there are a few arid squamates that are brightly colored, like the collared lizard or the tree agama, but I'm not too sure on what role bright colors play for them. I figured, since D. tenutonis was very small, it could be preyed upon by larger animals and so maybe bright colors could deter predators away. 
Hyrotrioskjan's avatar
HyrotrioskjanProfessional General Artist
HOW you depict these animals is totally up to you.
ropen7789's avatar
ropen7789Student Traditional Artist
Can anyone submit an entry? I'm a student at Emily Carr and I just got integrated into digital media, and this contest sounds really cool to test and see what I can do. 
Hyrotrioskjan's avatar
HyrotrioskjanProfessional General Artist
Sure, it's open for everyone 
Viergacht's avatar
ViergachtProfessional General Artist
It would be nice if they provided artists with some visuals to work from and some notes on the animals' life and ecology. I suspect it's not going to be easy to find good info online that's not behind paywalls.
Hyrotrioskjan's avatar
HyrotrioskjanProfessional General Artist
Also, are you familiar with scihub?
If yes you should like this paper www.jstor.org/stable/3515538?s…
Viergacht's avatar
ViergachtProfessional General Artist
I'm not - thanks! very helpful.
Hyrotrioskjan's avatar
HyrotrioskjanProfessional General Artist
Tom Hübner offers to send people information packages, a quick mail and you get a bunch of papers. They originally wanted have they as a download on the website, but someone 
voiced copyright concerns etc. and so they do it this way now. 
Viergacht's avatar
ViergachtProfessional General Artist
I'll have to do that, thanks!!
OtusArt's avatar
OtusArtStudent Traditional Artist
Quick question! What kind of environment were these animals living in? It would be great to know, as all animals have an environmental context.
Hyrotrioskjan's avatar
HyrotrioskjanProfessional General Artist
Plants were seed ferns and conifers 
Hyrotrioskjan's avatar
HyrotrioskjanProfessional General Artist
Mostly arid upland environment, more info in this paper just found it www.jstor.org/stable/3515538?s…

btw. are you familiar with schihub?
MesozoicScar's avatar
8:39 OK now that's just sad, even the London museums raptors have at least some plumage and the trex's skull is not a Jurassic park looking ass, and that museum is stuck in the 2000's, oof
Hyrotrioskjan's avatar
HyrotrioskjanProfessional General Artist
Feathers on T. rex remain debatable and that dromaeosaur is an JP homage. They museum didn't get much attention and funding until recently, they new exhibition will change this and the contest is supposed to help with that and bring contemporary paleoart into focus. 
MesozoicScar's avatar
I never said anything about the t rex having feathers, and i get it jp raptors are iconic, even i miss it, but that doesn't excuse people from putting that design and using it to teach kids about dinosaurs, and i am not using this museum as an example, there are worse ones out their, much worse

I didn't have knowledge of the low funding thing, i apologize on that front
Hyrotrioskjan's avatar
HyrotrioskjanProfessional General Artist
Oh sorry, I misread.

I agree the model is rather out of place there, what I know is that it is a relatively cheap, finished model you can also buy online and I guess at some point someone decided "needs more dinosaurs!" although
the collection and the museum focuses on Permian material and a little bit of Carboniferous and Triassic stuff. 
I hope this will change, for reasons you already mentioned. For me the real fossil material the collection has is more interesting anyway. 
MesozoicScar's avatar
lets just hope they label Arthlopleura as a millipede, and not a centipede:D (Big Grin) 
Hyrotrioskjan's avatar
HyrotrioskjanProfessional General Artist
It might not belong into any of these clades...
MesozoicScar's avatar
that's a topic for sea scorpions, which aren't scorpions at all, thanks science😒
anonymous's avatar
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