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dragon footprints

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Footprints of dragons are rare, very rare. It's a circumstance which have many reasons.
1. dragons are very lightbuild, only bigger species leave tracks behind.
2. dragons can fly, and they normally land on hard stable grounds (or on water)
3. dragons were never many, even during their best times they form only 1% of the bigger animals in their ecosystems.
4. some stratigraphic layers which may had footprints were destroyed by giant glaciers during the last ice ages.

Peru is a exeption.
Here in the middle of nowhere, paleontologists find three places with footprints of dragons and mammels.
Two of this deposits contain tracks of bigger lophoraptorids, but the third place, form the early pliocene, have a number of aquilapoda tracks which are belonged to a middle sized member of the wyvernidae. The lenght, and proportions of the footprints were compared with Limatops and Eurovenator feet which leads to an estimated lenght of 3 meters.
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anonymous's avatar
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Raptorboy998's avatar
Which one of the three on the map were the Aquilapoda tracks found?
Hyrotrioskjan's avatar
HyrotrioskjanProfessional General Artist
That in the middle
DinoBirdMan's avatar
DinoBirdManStudent Artist
Interesting.:hmm:
Hyrotrioskjan's avatar
HyrotrioskjanProfessional General Artist
Thanks =)
DinoBirdMan's avatar
DinoBirdManStudent Artist
You're welcome!:)
XenokingEvan's avatar
What spices is the dragon
Hyrotrioskjan's avatar
HyrotrioskjanProfessional General Artist
That is not known, we have no fossils of this species so far
JWArtwork's avatar
JWArtworkHobbyist Digital Artist
Very original concept! I like it a lot! :nod:
Hyrotrioskjan's avatar
HyrotrioskjanProfessional General Artist
Thanks =D
herofan135's avatar
herofan135Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Really awesome, imagining finding dragon tracks like that, how cool wouldn't that be? :D
Hyrotrioskjan's avatar
HyrotrioskjanProfessional General Artist
That was my point =D
Lazytroll's avatar
LazytrollHobbyist Artisan Crafter
:) Very nice intuitions! It's like living the footprints discover
Hyrotrioskjan's avatar
HyrotrioskjanProfessional General Artist
Thank you =)
Zinnorokkrah's avatar
Hurray! A new discovery! Would this be one of the early, social Aquilapoda that drove the Diplopternans and many early Lophoraptorids extinct?
Hyrotrioskjan's avatar
HyrotrioskjanProfessional General Artist
That's what some belife :nod:
Time and place would fit the story we extract from the fossil record.

Ah, and to be honest, it's an older discovery, the tracks were discovered in 1993
Zinnorokkrah's avatar
I see. Well, can't wait to see what other new- or potentially old -data comes out of your vaults :D
Hyrotrioskjan's avatar
HyrotrioskjanProfessional General Artist
:bow:
Krookodile0553's avatar
Is there any defining characteristics of Draconian footprints? From what I see they are almost identical to bird prints.
Hyrotrioskjan's avatar
HyrotrioskjanProfessional General Artist
It's indeed sometimes difficult to identify dragon foodprints, but especially in the case of the Aquilapoda there are few features which make it obvious that this is a dragon track.
The surface of the feet is much bigger as at every bird which have those toes to grab [link] , which shows these feet were used to walk and run, in addition this toe is longer than at birds: [link]
Also notable is the immense size and in some cases the prints of the wing-claws beside the footprints.
TheComicCreator's avatar
TheComicCreatorHobbyist Traditional Artist
Gahhh you make everything seem so legitimate :meow:
You sir, are a constant inspiration.
Hyrotrioskjan's avatar
HyrotrioskjanProfessional General Artist
Thank you very much :hug: =)
TheComicCreator's avatar
TheComicCreatorHobbyist Traditional Artist
You are very welcome sir :hug: :)
Hyrotrioskjan's avatar
HyrotrioskjanProfessional General Artist
=D
anonymous's avatar
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