Hyrotrioskjan's avatar

Spinophorosaurus

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EDIT
Because I had little time to work on this I made a few mistakes, most obvious are the tail spines which are now believed to be part of the pectoral girdle. I also painted a new version of the neck which 
directly references the new paper on neck mobility in this genus... and it's a good way to point of that MASSIVE TUMOR 


My last minute Spinophorosaurus painting for the new paper of Benjamin Jentgen-Ceschino, Koen Stein and Valentin Fischer.

"Case study of radial fibrolamellar bone tissues in the outer cortex of basal sauropods" royalsocietypublishing.org/d&#…
The tumor here is a little over the top, you don't really see it in the fossil itself, but for artistic purposes I depict here a later stage of the illness. Funny enough there is ANOTHER paper, this time only on Spinophorosaurus. I knew about this other study and actually tried to incorporate some of it into this piece from memory, but I didn't knew that it would be published today as well journals.plos.org/plosone/arti…:P So over the last minutes I fully adjusted my painting digitally to the new proportions and posture of this animal. 
IMAGE DETAILS
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© 2020 Hyrotrioskjan
Comments28
anonymous's avatar
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zilvart's avatar
zilvartProfessional Digital Artist
if you squint your eyes it looks a little like a whale with four legs, the silhouette is unclear, and that's not good. The first thing and most important thing is to have a clear silhouette where despite only one value can still see what it's supposed to be. if it's unclear as a silhouette then the painting is going to look bad too no matter how well you render it.
Hyrotrioskjan's avatar
HyrotrioskjanProfessional General Artist
That would have been endlessly boring, you assume that I wanted to paint a textbook illustration, that's not the case. 
zilvart's avatar
zilvartProfessional Digital Artist
I'm trying to tell you that the first read of a picture is the shapes, in this picture the first read you get is something in a weird shape you have no idea what it is before you stop looking at the details.  it's a common thing to make sure the silhouette read on its own. I'm not telling you it's a bad painting,  when you stop to look at it it's very neat, but it's that first impression which isn't in the right place.
Hyrotrioskjan's avatar
HyrotrioskjanProfessional General Artist
Oh, I totally understand that, it's just that I think it would be really boring if that would be the case. I like to produce art once in a while that only makes sense on a second look.
This is no infographic at the end of the day. 
zilvart's avatar
zilvartProfessional Digital Artist
it's just a compositional thing, something light in front of something dark would bring the neck forward so rim lighting would solve the issue.
Hyrotrioskjan's avatar
HyrotrioskjanProfessional General Artist
I know how to fix it, but for me there is nothing to fix. 
TheDarkMaster2's avatar
TheDarkMaster2Hobbyist General Artist
That is a big tumor
CTG22's avatar
CTG22Hobbyist Writer
cool dino :) 
bluewingfairy's avatar
Good morning, Spinophorosaurus is wonderful!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!.
CyberCorn-Entropic's avatar
CyberCorn-EntropicHobbyist Traditional Artist
I see you painted the Spinophorosaurus favoring its tumorous leg.  It seems that thing hurts.
Spottedchest's avatar
Lovely work, and an interesting thing to think about. Never thought about dinos getting tumours/cancer, but of course they would.
Jdailey1991's avatar
How?  If the injuries of some dinosaurs like Al or Sue are any indication, it's that they could and did survive injuries that would have killed a mammal.  In that respect, how'd a dinosaur suffer cancer?
Glavenychus's avatar
GlavenychusHobbyist General Artist
Because not everything is immune to cancer....
Jdailey1991's avatar
That's not a constructive answer.
Glavenychus's avatar
GlavenychusHobbyist General Artist
That's the point. Even though some exceptions are immune to certain cancer, asking the question "In that respect, how'd a dinosaur suffer cancer?" when literally it & other similar viruses is so widespread throughout animals and other organisms is nearly impossible to be immune to one or all doesn't need much explaining. Just like us and many other lifeforms on Earth, they are susceptible to it unfortunately...
Tasorius2's avatar
Apparently the point is to take art the direction of stupid nature programs that has to include something horrible no one in the world wants to see.
Jdailey1991's avatar
How could cancer cells beat through a dinosaur's high levels of plasma?
Glavenychus's avatar
GlavenychusHobbyist General Artist
That's sounds like the exact reason they could've gotten cancer, as it sounds like a case of myeloma which directly affects plasma cells in the bloodstream.
Jdailey1991's avatar
Never heard of alligators suffering cancer, and those guys have lots of plasma in their blood.
Glavenychus's avatar
GlavenychusHobbyist General Artist
They do get cancer, they don't have a huge resistance.
Taliesaurus's avatar
TaliesaurusHobbyist Digital Artist
aligator DO get cancer.
paleosir's avatar
paleosirHobbyist General Artist
Alligators can get cancer, they're just fairly resistant to it.
ThePokeSaurus's avatar
Looks lovely.
anonymous's avatar
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