Shop Forum More Submit  Join Login
×




MY BOOK IS AVAILABLE NOW!!(via blurb.com)

Softcover                     US $33.84   
Hardcover, Dust Jacket US $46.34
Hardcover, ImageWrap US $49.64

ORDER BY CLICKING THIS LINK
www.blurb.com/bookstore/detail… Particulae ex Nihilo

This Album contains a portfolio of Gromyko Padilla Semper's Selected Ink drawing,with an Introduction by acclaimed artist and book author, John Paul Thornton</B>

_____________________________________________________

ABOUT GROMYKO:

"Gromyko Semper is a young artist who stands at the crossroads of two realities: One is grounded in a tradition of high cultural metaphor, while the other is a sensual dream world of feverish risk. He does not dabble in either, but instead bounds into both simultaneously. His comprehension and connection to the great religious and historical visual languages of the world is nerve-rattling to viewers because it is so concise, and he reminds us that, when used properly, the symbols and stories of the past do not sleep in volumes of dusty books, but boom with terrible, matter-of-fact authority, like a gun of truth.

"Unlike artists from previous contemporary generations, he does not speak the language of ancient fable out of irony or desperation, but out of sharpened passion and even out of love. And then, Gromyko rejects the purely classical tongue as quickly as we recognize it. It becomes infused with the aura of metaphysical science, kaleidoscopic incantation and blasphemous zeal. The crossroads is never resolved. We are compelled to take both roads with him at once. We find that reality is never fully tangible and dreams manifest as incontestable.  

"These are not tricks of craft, but deliberate, passionate and ever-flowing assaults on the mundane. Gromyko sings to us that the entire human experience is ours to drink, all history is now ours to bathe in, all visual textures of heightened complexity are ours to feed upon. As viewers, we cannot help but take his outstretched hand."

- John Paul Thornton,2009



_____________________________________________________

I am included in Jon Beinart's surreal Art Collective...

click my page here--->beinart.org/artists/gromyko-pa…
  • Listening to: The Voices in and out of my Head!!!
  • Reading: Your mind, body, and soul/spirit!!
  • Watching: Your every move!!
  • Playing: your game!!
  • Eating: your innocence!!
  • Drinking: your fears away!!

IM LISTED ON BEINART.ORG

Journal Entry: Tue Nov 2, 2010, 7:50 AM

___________________________________________________________________
:star: Special Mentions:star:

Im hononored to announce that I was recently included in Jon Beinart's surreal Art Collective...

click my page here--->beinart.org/artists/gromyko-pa…



Sacrae Particulae Ex Nihilo
The Inspired Visions of Gromyko Semper

Vicente-Ignacio S. de Veyra


Going across a gallery full of Gromyko Semper ink/watercolor paintings and drawings (with his few oils) can be likened to listening to early Uriah Heep or some such old progressive rock music with all their fantastic abandon and iconoclastic humor possible. But, for now, we can’t be sure if Semper is merely an intelligent humorist, a happy/hermetic fantasist or a serious iconoclast.

In his first major solo show after so many group shows, Semper falls for the title The Minotaur’s Recompense (opening October 23, 6pm, at the Kulay-Diwa Gallery of Philippine Contemporary Art, Parañaque City). Sure, the show title is a tribute to The Soothsayer’s Recompense by Giorgio de Chirico, one of the stalwarts of proto-Surrealism. But the title betrays a Semperian love/hate relationship with mythology which is precisely what the anatomy of iconoclasm consists of. For iconoclasm, whether in imagery or the literary field, is actually a mission to supplant an existing religious hegemony for the facility of presenting alternative cosmic attachments. And so iconoclasm, while being a war effort, is also a display of that love/hate relationship with mythology. So, bearing that in mind, Semper—as a young Filipino exemplar in neosurrealism and visionary art—cannot be simplified as a mere parody artist with an abominable patience for imagery details but is in fact a religious mythologist himself. For, never forget, visionary art is its own mythology already. Like the old dada art and original surrealism, neosurrealism and visionary art are both old/new drugs that worship a Zen koan-like heaven, which is really a simple absinthe-afternoon heaven of complex juxtapositions.


The Minotaur’s Recompense

Semper As Per Iconoclasm
We’re not talking about the iconoclasm of destruction, of course, but the one more suited to our time and the artist’s profession—and that’s the type that appropriates, twists, and finally destroys the icon by emulating the snake that eats another snake to make that eaten snake this living renewed snake outside.

Semper’s art pieces aren’t lovely as a hare’s portrait, that’s obvious, but are snake-like in their charm. They actually appropriate religious and other humanist mythologies via their iconographic imagery and instantly parody (or generously twist) these. And the way Semper parodies ‘em all! He actually enters the art of iconography, goes through the religiosity of ceremonious patience in creating details, as if he were one of those craftsmen called by the mughal to decorate the Taj tiles or by the Jesuits to Mexicanize Santa Maria Tonantzintla Church’s ceiling.

And this is precisely where a Semper can go beyond being merely charming and become quite a delight. Because you religiously go through the details with the artist, examine with him each Breughelian serpentization of a scepter, each demonization of an immaculate virgin to expose her false demigoddess-ness in a gallery collective of false demigod-ness. And here is our signal to ask: Is Semper’s imagery a product of some heavy metal pseudo-Satanism or of a serious Hieronymus Bosch-ness (were Bosch a Reformationist)?

The answer to this question will vary, of course, from gallery visitor to another, from critic to critic. For each Semper piece is a potential conversation piece, provoking conversations which can snake their way into historical alluding, quoting, complicit denigrating as well as faithful defending. And that can only be so because in all their Albrecht Durer-like complexity, Semper’s detailed ink composites are in effect war sermons of disgust with the human history of religious iconographic lies and semi-lies.

Baroque Sempernoza
But forget for the moment that Semper was the first Filipino to be invited to participate in Keith Wigdor’s (and the International Surrealist Movement in the 21st Century’s) international Surrealism Now exhibit in Coimbra, Portugal. Or that before he went there in May of this year he co-edited with Héctor Pineda the book Imagine the Imagination: New Visions of Surrealism, published in Poland in 2009 by nEgoist Sp.z.o.o., with him writing the Introduction to the book. And of course he was one of the artists included in that anthology, joining a select 100 international surrealist/visionary artists, famous and unknown, working in the genre today.

Now the question might be asked: why would anyone in this religious country given to baroque Marian art be attracted to invest in a Semper of a seemingly new Filipino Enlightenment? Why would local galleries even be enthused to have him? Well, perhaps that’s the point. If Jose Saramago wasn’t Portuguese, his literary iconoclasm wouldn’t mean anything, would it? Yet, in the Catholic city of Lisboa, Saramago’s “anti-Christian” books had been commercial successes, the earlier one helped perhaps by his exile, the latter helped by the media focus on the Laureate’s newfound notoriety.

A Catholic country is the perfect, nay the logical, market/audience for new anti-religious or anti-humanist iconoclasm. Sempers can actually decorate a restaurant’s corners, emitting both decorative values as well as intelligent informed symbologies among dining historians, semioticians, and some such group of Filipino intellectuals.

So,…I mentioned heavy metal sensibilities (sans the airbrush) as well as intellectual freethinking ones. But beyond those circles and the esthetic formalist, is there another audience for Semper’s Voltairean titles? Oh yes, of course—there’s the J.R.R. Tolkien fan, the literary fan of archaic myths, as well as the ardent admirer of craftsmen’s patience. And, lastly, the investor in difficult craft who may care little for the fact that not all complex craftsmanship is intelligent art.

Semper Fidelis
That’s our signal. Now let’s examine Semper’s intelligence beyond the craft.

In his fidelity to details as well as to the exactitude of his titles, all in the hope perhaps of arriving at Umberto Eco’s “closed text” level for a more universal reading, Semper’s pieces are not simple book illustrations material however. While “Our Lady of Perpetual Abandon” is classic transparent parody, for instance, “Eulogy to Melancholy (Whose Tormentors Appear Before Pleroma)” is a semiotic field that could allude to as many significances as one can muster—one of which could be an allusion to Napoleonic self-crownings sanctioned by divine authority. “Paracelsus Preparing the Sacrae Particulae Ex Nihilo,” meanwhile, could be an homage to the Renaissance alchemist’s magic, as if Paracelsus is one of surrealist/visionary art’s inspirers. And while “Hecate, Anubis, Consus” may be deemed a subtle bow to Hieronymus Bosch panel paintings qua literary narrative-cum-satire, only this time using Roman gods instead of Christian ones, “The Hermetic Fool” might be read as both a sneer and a tribute portrait. And while “The Vessel of Balaam” goes beyond parody to wax loud mockery, “Circe’s Ventriloquy” skips loud parody to subtly portray a heroine/villain as a good/evil motherly lady with leprous hands.

So, there you are. It’s not as though the sacrae particulae of Semper-headedness came ex nihilo. And that intentionality is precisely what separates neosurrealism from good ol’ automatist surrealism. [V]

the event here:

www.facebook.com/event.php?eid…

www.kulay-diwa.com

themystic.posterous.com/gromyk…

________________________

The Minotaur's Recompense by gromyko

THE MINOTAUR'S RECOMPENSE

Time : Saturday, October 23 · 6:00pm - 9:00pm

Location Kulay-Diwa Gallery of Philippine Contemporary Art 25 Lopez Avenue, Lopez Village,Sucat Paranaque City, Metro Manila 1700 Philippines


Gromyko Semper

new works drawings and paintings

opening Reception:
October 23rd
Saturday
6pm...

The show will run from OCT 23-NOV 23 2010

I HOPE YOU ALL CAN MAKE IT

________________________





I am either Administrator/Moderator or Member of the following clubs:


:iconthe-surreal-arts:
:icontheexquisitecorpse:
:iconvisionaryartists:
:iconcollaborativecorpse:
:iconiiaaproject::iconemptyheads::iconmindoflead: :icontraditionalart::iconeliteartists: :icontheoccultside:
:iconbetter-when-wet:
:iconpainters:
:iconremodernists:
:iconrawem0tion:


let's share by deviant-ARCADE :thumb30565944:
Thank you stamp by Roxcessories Openminded Stamp by ChaoticGoddess
environment stamp by environment dA stamp: Inspired by... -001- by oddmodout
  • Listening to: The Voices in and out of my Head!!!
  • Reading: Your mind, body, and soul/spirit!!
  • Watching: Your every move!!
  • Playing: your game!!
  • Eating: your innocence!!
  • Drinking: your fears away!!
Sacrae Particulae Ex Nihilo
The Inspired Visions of Gromyko Semper


Vicente-Ignacio S. de Veyra


Going across a gallery full of Gromyko Semper ink/watercolor paintings and drawings (with his few oils) can be likened to listening to early Uriah Heep or some such old progressive rock music with all their fantastic abandon and iconoclastic humor possible. But, for now, we can’t be sure if Semper is merely an intelligent humorist, a happy/hermetic fantasist or a serious iconoclast.

In his first major solo show after so many group shows, Semper falls for the title The Minotaur’s Recompense (opening October 23, 6pm, at the Kulay-Diwa Gallery of Philippine Contemporary Art, Parañaque City). Sure, the show title is a tribute to The Soothsayer’s Recompense by Giorgio de Chirico, one of the stalwarts of proto-Surrealism. But the title betrays a Semperian love/hate relationship with mythology which is precisely what the anatomy of iconoclasm consists of. For iconoclasm, whether in imagery or the literary field, is actually a mission to supplant an existing religious hegemony for the facility of presenting alternative cosmic attachments. And so iconoclasm, while being a war effort, is also a display of that love/hate relationship with mythology. So, bearing that in mind, Semper—as a young Filipino exemplar in neosurrealism and visionary art—cannot be simplified as a mere parody artist with an abominable patience for imagery details but is in fact a religious mythologist himself. For, never forget, visionary art is its own mythology already. Like the old dada art and original surrealism, neosurrealism and visionary art are both old/new drugs that worship a Zen koan-like heaven, which is really a simple absinthe-afternoon heaven of complex juxtapositions.


The Minotaur’s Recompense

Semper As Per Iconoclasm
We’re not talking about the iconoclasm of destruction, of course, but the one more suited to our time and the artist’s profession—and that’s the type that appropriates, twists, and finally destroys the icon by emulating the snake that eats another snake to make that eaten snake this living renewed snake outside.

Semper’s art pieces aren’t lovely as a hare’s portrait, that’s obvious, but are snake-like in their charm. They actually appropriate religious and other humanist mythologies via their iconographic imagery and instantly parody (or generously twist) these. And the way Semper parodies ‘em all! He actually enters the art of iconography, goes through the religiosity of ceremonious patience in creating details, as if he were one of those craftsmen called by the mughal to decorate the Taj tiles or by the Jesuits to Mexicanize Santa Maria Tonantzintla Church’s ceiling.

And this is precisely where a Semper can go beyond being merely charming and become quite a delight. Because you religiously go through the details with the artist, examine with him each Breughelian serpentization of a scepter, each demonization of an immaculate virgin to expose her false demigoddess-ness in a gallery collective of false demigod-ness. And here is our signal to ask: Is Semper’s imagery a product of some heavy metal pseudo-Satanism or of a serious Hieronymus Bosch-ness (were Bosch a Reformationist)?

The answer to this question will vary, of course, from gallery visitor to another, from critic to critic. For each Semper piece is a potential conversation piece, provoking conversations which can snake their way into historical alluding, quoting, complicit denigrating as well as faithful defending. And that can only be so because in all their Albrecht Durer-like complexity, Semper’s detailed ink composites are in effect war sermons of disgust with the human history of religious iconographic lies and semi-lies.

Baroque Sempernoza
But forget for the moment that Semper was the first Filipino to be invited to participate in Keith Wigdor’s (and the International Surrealist Movement in the 21st Century’s) international Surrealism Now exhibit in Coimbra, Portugal. Or that before he went there in May of this year he co-edited with Héctor Pineda the book Imagine the Imagination: New Visions of Surrealism, published in Poland in 2009 by nEgoist Sp.z.o.o., with him writing the Introduction to the book. And of course he was one of the artists included in that anthology, joining a select 100 international surrealist/visionary artists, famous and unknown, working in the genre today.

Now the question might be asked: why would anyone in this religious country given to baroque Marian art be attracted to invest in a Semper of a seemingly new Filipino Enlightenment? Why would local galleries even be enthused to have him? Well, perhaps that’s the point. If Jose Saramago wasn’t Portuguese, his literary iconoclasm wouldn’t mean anything, would it? Yet, in the Catholic city of Lisboa, Saramago’s “anti-Christian” books had been commercial successes, the earlier one helped perhaps by his exile, the latter helped by the media focus on the Laureate’s newfound notoriety.

A Catholic country is the perfect, nay the logical, market/audience for new anti-religious or anti-humanist iconoclasm. Sempers can actually decorate a restaurant’s corners, emitting both decorative values as well as intelligent informed symbologies among dining historians, semioticians, and some such group of Filipino intellectuals.

So,…I mentioned heavy metal sensibilities (sans the airbrush) as well as intellectual freethinking ones. But beyond those circles and the esthetic formalist, is there another audience for Semper’s Voltairean titles? Oh yes, of course—there’s the J.R.R. Tolkien fan, the literary fan of archaic myths, as well as the ardent admirer of craftsmen’s patience. And, lastly, the investor in difficult craft who may care little for the fact that not all complex craftsmanship is intelligent art.

Semper Fidelis
That’s our signal. Now let’s examine Semper’s intelligence beyond the craft.

In his fidelity to details as well as to the exactitude of his titles, all in the hope perhaps of arriving at Umberto Eco’s “closed text” level for a more universal reading, Semper’s pieces are not simple book illustrations material however. While “Our Lady of Perpetual Abandon” is classic transparent parody, for instance, “Eulogy to Melancholy (Whose Tormentors Appear Before Pleroma)” is a semiotic field that could allude to as many significances as one can muster—one of which could be an allusion to Napoleonic self-crownings sanctioned by divine authority. “Paracelsus Preparing the Sacrae Particulae Ex Nihilo,” meanwhile, could be an homage to the Renaissance alchemist’s magic, as if Paracelsus is one of surrealist/visionary art’s inspirers. And while “Hecate, Anubis, Consus” may be deemed a subtle bow to Hieronymus Bosch panel paintings qua literary narrative-cum-satire, only this time using Roman gods instead of Christian ones, “The Hermetic Fool” might be read as both a sneer and a tribute portrait. And while “The Vessel of Balaam” goes beyond parody to wax loud mockery, “Circe’s Ventriloquy” skips loud parody to subtly portray a heroine/villain as a good/evil motherly lady with leprous hands.

So, there you are. It’s not as though the sacrae particulae of Semper-headedness came ex nihilo. And that intentionality is precisely what separates neosurrealism from good ol’ automatist surrealism. [V]

__________________________

the event here:

www.facebook.com/event.php?eid…

www.kulay-diwa.com

themystic.posterous.com/gromyk…

________________________

The Minotaur's Recompense by gromyko

THE MINOTAUR'S RECOMPENSE

Time : Saturday, October 23 · 6:00pm - 9:00pm

Location Kulay-Diwa Gallery of Philippine Contemporary Art 25 Lopez Avenue, Lopez Village,Sucat Paranaque City, Metro Manila 1700 Philippines


Gromyko Semper

new works drawings and paintings

opening Reception:
October 23rd
Saturday
6pm...

The show will run from OCT 23-NOV 23 2010

I HOPE YOU ALL CAN MAKE IT
________________

some works that will be in the show:

Paracyclopean Mother and child by gromyko

Enigma of Elizabeth Bathory by gromyko

King Nimrod by gromyko
A Journey into the world of Kris Kuksi
An Interview with Kris Kuksi by Gromyko Padilla Semper


:icongromyko:

:meditate:

:iconkuksi:


:thumb76217344:
KRIS KUKSI AT WORK

Many of us have laid our eyes at and admired the majestic works of the master Visionary Kris Kuksi...But very few of us had the oppurtunity to talk with him, or even chat with him...He appeared in our generation as a totem of hope that "surrealism" never died!!!

and he personally declared that: Surrealism will never die. It is a part of the human mind to be engaged with surreal thoughts and visions.


In his website the Introduction stated clearly what Kris Kuksi is about:

Kuksi’s art speaks of a timelessness–potentiality and motion attempting to reach on forever, and yet pessimistically delayed; forced into the stillness of death and eternal sleep. He treats morbidity with a sympathetic touch and symbolizes the paradox of the death of the individual by objective personification of death. There is a fear of this consciousness because it drops in upon us without mercy, and yet there is a need to appeal to it in order to provide a sense of security, however deluded that sense may be. Kuksi’s art warns us that this appeal is irrelevant, and that we should be slow to create a need for it. His themes also teach us that although death may pursue us arbitrarily, we should never neglect to mourn the tremendous loss of individual potential.*


*<courtesy of kuksi.com>

And we couldn't help but Agree!!!

his Art is timeless and yet it speaks to contemporary culture...with his use of gothic and baroque imagery married with an ever imaginative surreal vision, Kukis's pieces shall cast an ominous riddle on our minds, the eternal question about who we are, what are we, where are we going...and this Kuksi heralds in his works!!!

:thumb127478275:

Born March 2, 1973, in Springfield Missouri and growing up in neighboring Kansas, Kris spent his youth in rural seclusion and isolation along with a blue-collar, working mother, two much-older brothers and an absent father. Open country, sparse trees, and alcoholic stepfather, perhaps paved the way for an individual saturated in imagination and introversion. His fascination with the unusual lent to his macabre art later in life. The grotesque to him, as it seemed, was beautiful. Reaching adulthood his art blossomed and created a breakthrough of personal freedom from the negative environment experienced during his youth. He soon discovered his distaste for the typical American life and pop culture, feeling that he has always belonged to the ‘Old World’. Yet, Kris’ work is about a new wilderness, refined and elevated, visualized as a cultivation emerging from the corrupt and demoralized fall of modern-day society. A place were new beginnings, new wars, new philosophies, and new endings exist.

:thumb127476872:

In personal reflection, he feels that in the world today much of mankind is oftentimes frivolous and fragile, being driven primarily by greed and materialism. He hopes that his art exposes the fallacies of Man, unveiling a new level of awareness to the viewer. His work has received several awards and prizes and has been featured in over 100 exhibitions in galleries and museums worldwide including the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery. Kris’ art can also be seen in a number of international art magazines, book covers and theatrical posters. Kris’ art is featured in both public and private collections in the United States, Europe, and Australia that include individuals such as Mark Parker (Nike CEO), Kay Alden (three time Emmy award winning writer for Young and the Restless & Bold and the Beautiful), Fred Durst (musician, and film director), and Chris Weitz (movie director The Golden Compass & American Pie).*
_____________

In an attempt to get to know him more better and much more plainly and simply i gathered my guts and approached KK via the social network facebook...i sent him a message and he galdly responded...we shared some long and witty chat messages with each other, and being an avid fan of his work i was curious to know more of him so i decided to ask if he will be willing to do an interview...he complied, and this is the result of that...

It is really my priviledge, or must i say Honor to have been given the oppurtunity to be able to interview him.. Kris Kuksi is truly a Modern Master of our Age.. With patience, perseverance, and Genius, KK is destined to be one of our era's greats!!!

With that in consideration, im glad to have been able to know him, even if by cyber means thru the internet...perhaps one day our paths will cross

In the meantime I want you all to read and learn from what he has to say...

enjoy the words and works of KK!!!


:thumb144646868:


Gromyko Semper: Hi Master Kuksi, let me say that it is a huge priviledge and honor to have this interview with you...

KK: Thanks and i really appreciate it...nice:-)

Gromyko Semper: Let us begin then...

KK: Go on:-)


Gromyko Semper:Can you Tell us something about yourself, your background and how you began to recognize your talents.

Kris Kuksi: Ever since I was very young I always drew pictures or occupied my time with being creative. I had realized that I could out-draw all the other kids in grade school, so I was gaining some pretty good confidence in my early years. And that eventually went on to be recognized by several teachers that placed me in upper level art classes.

GPS: When did you first become interested in sculpture/painting/drawing?

KK: Drawing is what I did for the first several years of my life, then around age 12 I got into painting and went off to college and got two degrees in painting. And yet the sculptures didn't really start until 2004, although I have done a few in the mid 90's for fun.

:thumb55092830:
:thumb28392188:
:thumb28390771:

:thumb28390696:
:thumb28390522:
:thumb28392056:
:thumb42618051:

GPS: Where did you draw inspiration in creating your ART?

KK: Inspiration for me is derived from the Baroque and Gothic style architecture and I try to marry that with the modern world of industrial structures and design. But overall there is social commentary that I am after and so I do draw a lot of ideas from society and philosophy.

:thumb44813059:
:thumb139219051:
:thumb139219463:
:thumb100673286:
:thumb147109943:
:thumb134783622:
:thumb117067605:



GPS: Looking deeply in your Art, can you tell us what is it you wish to impart or share with the viewers? The meaning/message of your works?.

KK: That mankind is sometimes not so kind. That we should really look at ourselves and see that we are who we are and that includes the not so nice things. But we should at least see ourselves and those who can change our behaviors for the better.

:thumb79740902:


GPS: Can you give us a glimpse on your work methods, how long does it take your works before being done, and some alchemic secrets in the craft?

KK: Well, I start with sketches and ideas that randomly appear and then proceed to find ways to bring about the vision with all the parts I have. I use mostly model kit parts and various collectables to achieve what I must. There is a lot of reshaping and cutting and fine tuning of every single part to get the exact look I'm after. There is a phrase called "Kit-bashing" in fine scale modeling that comes close to it. But no, I don't use any such alchemic methods...but I'm open to the idea!

:thumb92852452:
:thumb57595496:
:thumb57595289:
:thumb63452291:
:thumb92774433:

GPS: Which of your works could you consider a masterpiece and why?

KK: Hmmm...I think most of them are masterpieces. I don't know if I have a real favorite but I certainly like "An Opera for the Apocalypse" and "A Tribute to the Madness of Beethoven". These works capture a mood, emotion, or even a rhythmic quality that make them timeless. And it is interesting that they both deal loosely with music and composers.

:thumb132026248:

:thumb123024582:

GPS: What can you say about the current sate of the ARTS, particularly the surreal/fantastic/visionary genre, and how your art relates or communes with this?

KK: Surrealism will never die. It is a part of the human mind to be engaged with surreal thoughts and visions. Certainly I believe that I have contributed to this genre and given a whole new aesthetic to sculpture and design. It will be interesting to see what will happen in the future and how my work will morph and develop.

:thumb65027201:

GPS: Do you think you are confident with the current state of your works? I mean is there more to learn for a master such as yourself?

KK: There is always room to learn. I accept challenges as often as I can. Surely there are many more ideas to be explored and many years to invest time and effort in doing so. But hopefully life will pave a way for me to to do so until I die.

:thumb92844284:

GPS: What can you advise aspiring artists, such as myself with regards to creating ART?

KK: Never give up and always stay true to your ideas and feelings. Don't copy others, stay focused and mentally clear. And again, never give up.

:thumb92800155:
The Imminent Utopia

GPS: where is Kris Kuksi going now?

KK: Off to bigger and better things...with a few modest sized works in between.


GPS: Any final message my friend?

KK: To those reading this, don't let yourself down, don't be a victim in any way to others or yourself, and relax and make art. Don't place anyone or anything on a pedestal, because we artists like to do that, and again-never give up!

:thumb28391977:

____________

Complete CV:

Curriculum Vitae
Exhibitions

Upcoming
    Shooting Gallery, San Francisco, April 2010
    Scope Art Fair, Basel Switzerland, June 2010
2009
    “Scope Art Fair”Art Basel, Miami, Florida, December (Group)
    “Beast Anthology”Joshua Liner Gallery, New York, New York, November (Solo)
    “Steampunk”Museum of the History of Science-Unversity of Oxford, Oxford, England, October-February (Group)
    “The 13th Hour”Last Rites Gallery, New York, New York, October (Group)
    “Carnival of Fires”Gallery 5, Richmond, Virginia, October (Group)
    “The Blab Show”Copro-Nason Gallery, Santa Monica, California, August (Invitational)
    “Kansas Master’s Invitational”Strecker-Nelson Gallery, Manhattan, Kansas, August (Group)
    “Monster?”Copro-Nason Gallery, Santa Monica, California, July (Group)
    “Summer Group Show ‘09”Stolen Space, London, England, July (Group)
    “Divine Invasion”Meta Gallery, Toronto, Ontario, May-June (Solo)
    “Overdose”Copro Nason, Santa Monica, California, April (Group)
2008
    “Scope”Art Basel-Miami, Miami, Florida, December (Invitational)
    “Imminent Utopia”Joshua Liner Gallery, New York, New York, November-December (Solo)
    “New Works”Shooting Gallery, San Francisco, October-November (Invitational)
    “The 13th Hour”Last Rites Gallery, New York, New York, October-November (Invitational)
    “Mapmakers”Meta Gallery, Toronto, Ontario, September-October (Invitational)
    “Paradise Lost”Williamsburg Art & Historical Center, Brooklyn, New York, September (Invitational)
    “Locked and Loaded”Joshua Liner Gallery, New York, New York, April (Invitational)
2007
    “Art Basel-Miami”Miami, Florida, December (Invitational)
    “Illusions of Reality”Strecker-Nelson Gallery, Manhattan, Kansas, September (Invitational)
    “Salon Macabre”Strychnin Gallery, New York, New York, July (Invitational)
    “Cologne Liste”Cologne Art Fair, Cologne, Germany (Juried)
    “Four Play”Lineage Gallery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, April-May (Invitational)
    “Oblivion”Strychnin Gallery, Berlin, Germany, April-May (Invitational)
    “Dark Hearts and Broken Vows”Strychnin Gallery, New York, New York, February (Invitational)
    “Winter Faction”Lineage Gallery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, January (Invitational)
2006
    “Faculty Art Exhibition”Moss-Thorns Gallery of Art, Hays, Kansas, December (Invitational)
    “Be Angel, Strange”Grand Palais, Salon Comparaisons 2006, Paris, France, November (Invitational)
    “Be Angel, Strange”International Fantastic Show Chimeria 2006, Sedan, France, October-November (Invitational)
    “Up!”Lineage Gallery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, July-August (Invitational)
    “The Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition Exhibtion”Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery, Wasington, DC, July-February 2007 (Juried)
    “Flights of Imagination”H.R. Giger Museum-Chateau St. Germain, Gruyères, Switzerland, June-July (Juried)
    “Person to Person: A Group Figurative Exhibit”Strecker-Nelson Art Gallery, Manhattan, Kansas, June-July (Invitational)
    “Old Master’s New Visions Seminar Exhibition”The Alte Stadthalle Galleries, Veichtach, Germany, June-July (Invitational)
    “Contemporary Mandalas”Chapel of Sacred Mirrors-Microcosm Gallery, New York, New York, May-June (Invitational)
    “Inter-dimensional Art Movement”Gallery of the Senses, Seattle, Washington, May-June (Invitational)
    “Smoky Hill Art Exhibition”Hays Arts Center, Hays, Kansas, May-June (Juried)
    “Non-Representational On-Line Exhibition”Art-Exchange.com, March-April (Juried)
    “Juxtaposition On-Line Exhibition”Artrom Gallery, Rome, Italy, March (Juried)
    “8th Annual All Media International Juried Online Art Exhibition”Upstream People Gallery, Omaha, Nebraska, January (Juried)
2005
    “Annual Artrom Gallery 2005 International On-Line Competition”Artrom Gallery, Rome, Italy, November 2005 (Juried)
    “Tetanus”Fahrenheit Gallery, Kansas City, Missouri, October-November 2005 (Invitational)
    “Annual Faculty Art Exhibition”Moss-Thorns Gallery of Art, Hays, Kansas, October 2005 (Invitational)
    “What is Freedom”Gallery of Social and Political Art, Boston, Massachusetts, September-October 2005 (Juried)
    “Old Master’s-New Visions Art Exhibition”Das Alte Rathaus, Viechtach, Germany, July-August 2005 (Invitational)
    “Inter-dimensional Art Movement”Gallery of the Senses, Seattle, Washington, May-June 2005 (Invitational)
    “Fantastic 2005: International On-line Exhibition”Artrom Gallery, Rome, Italy May 2005 (Juried)
    “Contemporary Drawings”Fraser Gallery, Washington D.C., February-March 2005 (Invitational)
    “7th Annual All Media Juried Online International Art Exhibition”Upstream People Gallery, Omaha, Nebraska, January 2005 (Invitational)
2004
    “Beyond Boundaries: International on-line competition and Exhibition”Artrom Gallery, Rome, Italy, November (Juried)
    “The Strange and the Fantastic”Leedy-Voulkos Art Center, Kansas City, Missouri, September-October (Solo)
    “Fantastic Visions”Limner Gallery, Phoenicia, New York, September (Juried)
    “Art Visionary Exhibition”Ballarat Regional Gallery, Ballarat, Australia, August (Invitational)
    “Just a Taste”Monarch Sculpture Park, Olympia, Washington, July (Group)
    “Inter-dimensional Art Movement”Gallery of the Senses, Seattle, Washington, May-June (Invitational)
    “The Great Passage”Optic Nerve Arts Gallery, Portland, Oregon, April-May (Solo)
    “Art Visionary Exhibition”Manning Regional Art Gallery, Taree, Australia, March-April (Invitational)
    “Art Visionary Exhibition”Riddoch Art Gallery, Mount Gambier, Australia, April-June (Invitational)
2003
    “Grave Matters”Roc La Rue Gallery, Seattle, Washington, October (Group)
    “Brave Destiny Grand Surrealism Show”Williamsburg Art & Historical Center, New York, New York, September-November (Juried)
    “Art Visionary Exhibition”Orange County Regional Gallery, Orange, Australia, August-September (Invitational)
    “Painting in Dali’s Garden-Seminar Exhibition”Villa Arenella, Cadaques, Spain, July (Invitational)
    “Art Visionary Exhibition”Global Arts Link Ipswitch Regional Gallery, Ipswitch / Brisbane, Australia, June-August (Invitational)
    “Figure Paintings”The Fraser Gallery, Bethesda, Maryland, June (Invitational)
    "The Mythic Quest"www.dracoblu.com, May (Juried)
    “Inter-dimensional Art Movement”Gallery of the Senses, Seattle, Washington, May (Invitational)
    “Spring Salon International Exhibition 2003”Limner Gallery, New York, New York, May (Invitational)
    “The Within”The Fraser Gallery, Washington, D.C., April-May (Solo)
2002
    “National Fall Exhibition 2002”Impact Artists Gallery, Buffalo, New York, November (Juried)
    “The Dreamer and the Dreamed”www.dracoblu.com, August (Juried)
    “Artists in Action”Garden Art Center, Lubbock, Texas, August (Juried)
    “Old Masters New Visions”Castle Kuenburg, Reichenau, Austria, August (Invitational)
    “Northern National Juried Art Exhibit 2002”Nicolet Area Technical College Art Gallery, Rhinelander, Wisconsin, July-September (Juried)
    “Toward the Within MFA Exhibition”Moss-Thorns Gallery of Art, Hays, Kansas, April-July (Solo)
    “Fifteenth Annual International Exhibition on Animals in Art”Veterinary Medicine Library, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, March-April (Juried)
    “International Drawing Exhibition 2002”University of Hawaii at Hilo Campus Center Gallery, Hilo, Hawaii, January-April (Invitational)
    “Art of the Imagination Exhibition”Cork Street Gallery, London, England, February (Juried)
    “Emerging Artists 2002 International Exhibition”Limner Gallery, New York, New York, February (Juried)
    “Seven State Biennial”Leslie Powell Art Gallery, Lawton, Oklahoma, January-March (Juried)
    “National Oil and Acrylic Exhibition”St. Louis Artist Guild Gallery at Knoll Park, Clayton, Missouri, December 2001-January (Juried)
2001
    “Seven State Biennial”University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma Art Gallery, Chicksha, Oklahoma, October-December (Juried)
    “Northern National Juried Art Exhibit”Nicolet Area Technical College Art Gallery, Rhinelander, Wisconsin, July-September (Juried)
    “32nd Annual Smoky Hill Art Competition & Exhibition”Hays Arts Center, Hays, Kansas, April (Juried)
    “Visions Across Continents”Santa Repararta International School of Fine Art, Florence, Italy, May (Invitational)
    “Fourteenth Annual International Exhibition on Animals in Art”Veterinary Medicine Library, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, March (Juried)
    “Emerging Artists 2001 International Exhibition”Limner Gallery, New York, New York, February (Juried)
2000
    “Juried Art Exhibition 2000”Carnegie Center for the Arts, Dodge City, Kansas, November (Juried)
    “Art from Recycled Materials Juried Exhibition”Sternberg Museum of Natural History, Hays, Kansas, May (Invitational)
    “3rd Annual Juried National Art Exhibition”Baker Arts Center, Liberal, Kansas, January (Juried)
    “Graduate Student Exhibition 2000”Garden City Community College, Garden City, Kansas, March (Invitational)

Awards

2006
    “Smoky Hill Art Exhibition”Cash Award, Hays Arts Center, Hays, Kansas
    “Smoky Hill Art Exhibition”Juror’s Merit Award, Hays Arts Center, Hays, Kansas
    “8th Annual All Media International Juried Online Art Exhibition”Award of Excellence, Upstream People Gallery, Omaha, Nebraska
2005
    “Who’s Who in America: 60th Diamond Edition”published by Marquis Who’s Who, New Providence, New Jersey
    “Fantastic 2005”First Place Award, Artrom Gallery, Rome, Italy
2003
    “Brave Destiny: Grand Surrealism Exhibition”Award of Merit, Williamsburg Art and Historical Center, New York, New York
    “Direct Art Magazine”First Place Award, Slowart Productions, New York, New York
2001
    “Angel of the Arts Prize”St. Louis Artist’s Guild, Clayton, Missouri

Interviews and Features

2008
    “The Everywhere Collector”Juxtapoz #93, October
    “Kris Kuksi”Juxtapoz Blog, March
2007
    “Basel Tov”Miami Sun, December
    “Art of the Grotesque”Dark Roasted Blend, October
    “Featured Artist”Eternal Vigilance, July
    “beinArt Interview”beinArt, May
    “What You Don’t Know About Kris Kuksi”Don’t Panic
    Artzine #12
    Hi-Fructose volume 5
2005
    “Direct Art”volume 11, Spring/Summer
2003
    “Direct Art”volume 8, Spring/Summer
2002
    “Direct Art”volume 7, Fall/Winter
2001
    “Direct Art”volume 5, Fall

______________________________

:iconkuksi: will also be featured in the latest project of :iconthe-surreal-arts:

the book IMAGINE THE IMAGINATION: NEW VISIONS OF SURREALISM

Mature Content

Imagine The Imagination by nEgoist


Album available at www.shop.negoist.com

The book aims to show the variety of contemporary surreal art including 100 works in different media: traditional painting and drawing, digital painting, fractals, photomanipulation, photography, mixed media, sculpture, traditional prints, and more.

The collection will be classified in 3 groups: Visions, Dreams and Nightmares, all this mental manifestation has been the source of inspiration for this revolutionary movement since the 1920s.

The mind gates are open to explore the deepest of the subconscious in this visual dialogue with the “other”, in the omnipotence of dream, in the disinterested play of thought.
___

Editor: Héctor Pineda
Co-editor: Gromyko Semper.
Introduction by: Gromyko Semper
Poetry by: Anthony Mason
___

Interview by :icongromyko:

Much thanks to Kris Kuksi for his kindness and wittiness!!!


visit KK at his website: www.kuksi.com
Exceptional Surrealist feature No.6

The Heretical Art of Hector Pineda Garcia

a.k.a. HectorPineda

Hector's artwork tackled a deep, philosophical, and yet highly erotic side of the subconscious, the part where desire is at its most highest peak.
He combines the precise illusionistic techniques of magritte and Dali and blasphemously imbue it with the manace of Max Ernst, z. beksinsi, and HR Giger.
:iconhectorpineda:
:star:

Hector Pineda Garcia is not just a typical Photomanipulator. He is not just a simple surrealist artist. He is both and more.

Hector's artwork tackled a deep, philosophical, and yet highly erotic side of the subconscious, the part where desire is at its most highest peak.
He combines the precise illusionistic techniques of magritte and Dali and blasphemously imbue it with the manace of Max Ernst, z. beksinsi, and HR Giger.

With a fertile imagination he creates some of the world's greatest, if not disturbin photomanipulations. Sensual Surrealism best describes his work. It is as if gothic spirits takes possession of his soul and cries out in visions these nightmares that when viewed, would want the viewer never to wake up.

Hector's dreamworld is a meticulously made one.

He does not only excel in digital art but he also is a masterful draftsman, creating images as enigmatic as his digital works.

in one of his works he stated the following:

"She combines all things, however diverse, soul and body, ear, tonghe, eyes and colour, she unites poopsites, freezes and burns simultaneously, loses her wits and finds them again, trembles and is close to death, so that in her not maraly one passion is apparent but a conflict of passions."

The conflicting passion of Human Existence is the prevalent theme with which Hector best illustrates...

come and enjoy the feast for the eyes and let his nightmarish visions envelop you...open your eyes and dont ever close it!!!!


Digital Dreams and Nightmares

:thumb129295168:

:thumb125636857:

:thumb124399009:

:thumb107416077:

:thumb125745300:

:thumb101600604:

:thumb121907545:



Traditional Gems:

:thumb123572979:

:thumb102384427:

:thumb115634142:

:thumb120484974:

:thumb118709108:

featured by:
:icongromyko:
SECRETS OF THE MAGICAL

SURREALIST ART

Written Surrealist composition

or

first and last draft


After you have settled yourself in a place as favorable as possible to the concentration of your mind upon itself, have writing materials brought to you. Put yourself in as passive, or receptive, a state of mind as you can. Forget about your genius, your talents, and the talents of everyone else. Keep reminding yourself that literature is one of the saddest roads that leads to everything. Write quickly, without any preconceived subject, fast enough so that you will not remember what you're writing and be tempted to reread what you have written. The first sentence will come spontaneously, so compelling is the truth that with every passing second there is a sentence unknown to our consciousness which is only crying out to be heard. It is somewhat of a problem to form an opinion about the next sentence; it doubtless partakes both of our conscious activity and of the other, if one agrees that the fact of having written the first entails a minimum of perception.
This should be of no importance to you, however; to a large extent, this is what is most interesting and intriguing about the Surrealist game. The fact still remains that punctuation no doubt resists the absolute continuity of the flow with which we are concerned, although it may seem as necessary as the arrangement of knots in a vibrating cord. Go on as long as you like. Put your trust in the inexhaustible nature of the murmur. If silence threatens to settle in if you should ever happen to make a mistake -- a mistake, perhaps due to carelessness -- break off without hesitation with an overly clear line. Following a word the origin of which seems suspicious to you, place any letter whatsoever, the letter "l" for example, always the letter "l," and bring the arbitrary back by making this letter the first of the following word.

How not to be bored any longer when with others

This is very difficult. Don't be at home for anyone, and occasionally, when no one has forced his way in, interrupting you in the midst of your Surrealist activity, and you, crossing your arms, say: "It doesn't matter, there are doubtless better things to do or not do. Interest in life is indefensible Simplicity, what is going on inside me, is still tiresome to me!" or an other revolting banality.

To make speeches

Just prior to the elections, in the first country which deems it worthwhile to proceed in this kind of public expression of opinion, have yourself put on the ballot. Each of us has within himself the potential of an orator: multicolored loin cloths, glass trinkets of words. Through Surrealism he will take despair unawares in its poverty. One night, on a stage, he will, by himself, carve up the eternal heaven, that Peau de l'ours. He will promise so much that any promises he keeps will be a source of wonder and dismay. In answer to the claims of an entire people he will give a partial and ludicrous vote. He will make the bitterest enemies partake of a secret desire which will blow up the countries. And in this he will succeed simply by allowing himself to be moved by the immense word which dissolves into pity and revolves in hate. Incapable of failure, he will play on the velvet of all failures. He will be truly elected, and women will love him with an all-consuming passion.

To write false novels

Whoever you may be, if the spirit moves you burn a few laurel leaves and, without wishing to tend this meager fire, you will begin to write a novel. Surrealism will allow you to: all you have to do is set the needle marked "fair" at "action," and the rest will follow naturally. Here are some characters rather different in appearance; their names in your handwriting are a question of capital letters, and they will conduct themselves with the same ease with respect to active verbs as does the impersonal pronoun "it" with respect to words such as "is raining," "is," "must," etc. They will command them, so to speak, and wherever observation, reflection, and the faculty of generalization prove to be of no help to you, you may rest assured that they will credit you with a thousand intentions you never had. Thus endowed with a tiny number of physical and moral characteristics, these beings who in truth owe you so little will thereafter deviate not one iota from a certain line of conduct about which you need not concern yourself any further. Out of this will result a plot more or less clever in appearance, justifying point by point this moving or comforting denouement about which you couldn't care less. Your false novel will simulate to a marvelous degree a real novel; you will be rich, and everyone will agree that "you've really got a lot of guts," since it's also in this region that this something is located.

Of course, by an analogous method, and provided you ignore what you are reviewing, you can successfully devote yourself to false literary criticism.

How to catch the eye of a woman

you pass in the street

............................................................

Against death

Surrealism will usher you into death, which is a secret society. It will glove your hand, burying therein the profound M with which the word Memory begins. Do not forget to make proper arrangements for your last will and testament: speaking personally, I ask that I be taken to the cemetery in a moving van. May my friends destroy every last copy of the printing of the Speech concerning the Modicum of Reality.

“ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “

Language has been given to man so that he may make Surrealist use of it. To the extent that he is required to make himself understood, he manages more or less to express himself, and by so doing to fulfill certain functions culled from among the most vulgar. Speaking, reading a letter, present no real problem for him, provided that, in so doing, he does not set himself a goal above the mean, that is, provided he confines himself to carrying on a conversation (for the pleasure of conversing) with someone. He is not worried about the words that are going to come, nor about the sentence which will follow after the sentence he is just completing. To a very simple question, he will be capable of making a lightning-like reply. In the absence of minor tics acquired through contact with others, he can without any ado offer an opinion on a limited number of subjects; for that he does not need to "count up to ten" before speaking or to formulate anything whatever ahead of time. Who has been able to convince him that this faculty of the first draft will only do him a disservice when he makes up his mind to establish more delicate relationships? There is no subject about which he should refuse to talk, to write about prolifically. All that results from listening to oneself, from reading what one has written, is the suspension of the occult, that admirable help. I am in no hurry to understand myself (basta! I shall always understand myself). If such and such a sentence of mine turns out to be somewhat disappointing, at least momentarily, I place my trust in the following sentence to redeem its sins; I carefully refrain from starting it over again or polishing it. The only thing that might prove fatal to me would be the slightest loss of impetus. Words, groups of words which follow one another, manifest among themselves the greatest solidarity. It is not up to me to favor one group over the other. It is up to a miraculous equivalent to intervene -- and intervene it does.

Not only does this unrestricted language, which I am trying to render forever valid, which seems to me to adapt itself to all of life's circumstances, not only does this language not deprive me of any of my means, on the contrary it lends me an extraordinary lucidity, and it does so in an area where I least expected it. I shall even go so far as to maintain that it instructs me and, indeed, I have had occasion to use surreally words whose meaning I have forgotten. I was subsequently able to verify that the way in which I had used them corresponded perfectly with their definition. This would leave one to believe that we do not "learn," that all we ever do is "relearn." There are felicitous turns of speech that I have thus familiarized myself with. And I am not talking about the poetic consciousness of objects which I have been able to acquire only after a spiritual contact with them repeated a thousand times over.

The forms of Surrealist language adapt themselves best to dialogue. Here, two thoughts confront each other; while one is being delivered, the other is busy with it; but how is it busy with it? To assume that it incorporates it within itself would be tantamount to admitting that there is a time during which it is possible for it to live completely off that other thought, which is highly unlikely. And, in fact, the attention it pays is completely exterior; it has only time enough to approve or reject -- generally reject -- with all the consideration of which man is capable. This mode of language, moreover, does not allow the heart of the matter to be plumbed. My attention, prey to an entreaty which it cannot in all decency reject, treats the opposing thought as an enemy; in ordinary conversation, it "takes it up" almost always on the words, the figures of speech, it employs; it puts me in a position to turn it to good advantage in my reply by distorting them. This is true to such a degree that in certain pathological states of mind, where the sensorial disorders occupy the patient's complete attention, he limits himself, while continuing to answer the questions, to seizing the last word spoken in his presence or the last portion of the Surrealist sentence some trace of which he finds in his mind.

Q. "How old are you?" A. "You." (Echolalia.)

Q. "What is your name?" A. "Forty-five houses." (Ganser syndrome, or beside-the-point replies.)

There is no conversation in which some trace of this disorder does not occur. The effort to be social which dictates it and the considerable practice we have at it are the only things which enable us to conceal it temporarily. It is also the great weakness of the book that it is in constant conflict with its best, by which I mean the most demanding, readers. In the very short dialogue that I concocted above between the doctor and the madman, it was in fact the madman who got the better of the exchange. Because, through his replies, he obtrudes upon the attention of the doctor examining him -- and because he is not the person asking the questions. Does this mean that his thought at this point is stronger? Perhaps. He is free not to care any longer about his age or name.

Poetic Surrealism, which is the subject of this study, has focused its efforts up to this point on reestablishing dialogue in its absolute truth, by freeing both interlocutors from any obligations and politeness. Each of them simply pursues his soliloquy without trying to derive any special dialectical pleasure from it and without trying to impose anything whatsoever upon his neighbor. The remarks exchanged are not, as is generally the case, meant to develop some thesis, however unimportant it may be; they are as disaffected as possible. As for the reply that they elicit, it is, in principle, totally indifferent to the personal pride of the person speaking. The words, the images are only so many springboards for the mind of the listener. In Les Champs magnétiques, the first purely Surrealist work, this is the way in which the pages grouped together under the title Barrières must be conceived of -- pages wherein Soupault and I show ourselves to be impartial interlocutors.







Surrealism does not allow those who devote themselves to it to forsake it whenever they like. There is every reason to believe that it acts on the mind very much as drugs do; like drugs, it creates a certain state of need and can push man to frightful revolts. It also is, if you like, an artificial paradise, and the taste one has for it derives from Baudelaire's criticism for the same reason as the others. Thus the analysis of the mysterious effects and special pleasures it can produce -- in many respects Surrealism occurs as a new vice which does not necessarily seem to be restricted to the happy few; like hashish, it has the ability to satisfy all manner of tastes -- such an analysis has to be included in the present study.

1. It is true of Surrealist images as it is of opium images that man does not evoke them; rather they "come to him spontaneously, despotically. He cannot chase them away; for the will is powerless now and no longer controls the faculties."* (Baudelaire.) It remains to be seen whether images have ever been "evoked." If one accepts, as I do, Reverdy's definition it does not seem possible to bring together, voluntarily, what he calls "two distant realities." The juxtaposition is made or not made, and that is the long and the short of it. Personally, I absolutely refuse to believe that, in Reverdy's work, images such as

In the brook, there is a song that flows

or:

Day unfolded like a white tablecloth

or:

The world goes back into a sack

reveal the slightest degree of premeditation. In my opinion, it is erroneous to claim that "the mind has grasped the relationship" of two realities in the presence of each other. First of all, it has seized nothing consciously. It is, as it were, from the fortuitous juxtaposition of the two terms that a particular light has sprung, the light of the image, to which we are infinitely sensitive. The value of the image depends upon the beauty of the spark obtained; it is, consequently, a function of the difference of potential between the two conductors. When the difference exists only slightly, as in a comparison,* (Compare the image in the work of Jules Renard.) the spark is lacking. Now, it is not within man's power, so far as I can tell, to effect the juxtaposition of two realities so far apart. The principle of the association of ideas, such as we conceive of it, militates against it. Or else we would have to revert to an elliptical art, which Reverdy deplores as much as I. We are therefore obliged to admit that the two terms of the image are not deduced one from the other by the mind for the specific purpose of producing the spark, that they are the simultaneous products of the activity I call Surrealist, reason's role being limited to taking note of, and appreciating, the luminous phenomenon.

And just as the length of the spark increases to the extent that it occurs in rarefied gases, the Surrealist atmosphere created by automatic writing, which I have wanted to put within the reach of everyone, is especially conducive to the production of the most beautiful images. One can even go so far as to say that in this dizzying race the images appear like the only guideposts of the mind. By slow degrees the mind becomes convinced of the supreme reality of these images. At first limiting itself to submitting to them, it soon realizes that they flatter its reason, and increase its knowledge accordingly. The mind becomes aware of the limitless expanses wherein its desires are made manifest, where the pros and cons are constantly consumed, where its obscurity does not betray it. It goes forward, borne by these images which enrapture it, which scarcely leave it any time to blow upon the fire in its fingers. This is the most beautiful night of all, the lightning-filled night: day, compared to it, is night.

The countless kinds of Surrealist images would require a classification which I do not intend to make today. To group them according to their particular affinities would lead me far afield; what I basically want to mention is their common virtue. For me, their greatest virtue, I must confess, is the one that is arbitrary to the highest degree, the one that takes the longest time to translate into practical language, either because it contains an immense amount of seeming contradiction or because one of its terms is strangely concealed; or because, presenting itself as something sensational, it seems to end weakly (because it suddenly closes the angle of its compass), or because it derives from itself a ridiculous formal justification, or because it is of a hallucinatory kind, or because it very naturally gives to the abstract the mask of the concrete, or the opposite, or because it implies the negation of some elementary physical property, or because it provokes laughter. Here, in order, are a few examples of it:

The ruby of champagne. (LAUTRÉAMONT)

Beautiful as the law of arrested development of the breast in adults, whose propensity to growth is not in proportion to the quantity of molecules that their organism assimilates. (LAUTRÉAMONT)

A church stood dazzling as a bell. (PHILIPPE SOUPAULT)

In Rrose Sélavy's sleep there is a dwarf issued from a well who comes to eat her bread at night. (ROBERT DESNOS)

On the bridge the dew with the head of a tabby cat lulls itself to sleep. (ANDRÉ BRETON)

A little to the left, in my firmament foretold, I see -- but it's doubtless but a mist of blood and murder -- the gleaming glass of liberty's disturbances. (LOUIS ARAGON)

In the forest aflame

The lions were fresh. (ROBERT VITRAC)

The color of a woman's stockings is not necessarily in the likeness of her eyes, which led a philosopher who it is pointless to mention, to say: "Cephalopods have more reasons to hate progress than do quadrupeds."

(MAX MORISE)

1st. Whether we like it or not, there is enough there to satisfy several demands of the mind. All these images seem to attest to the fact that the mind is ripe for something more than the benign joys it allows itself in general. This is the only way it has of turning to its own advantage the ideal quantity of events with which it is entrusted.* (Let us no forget that, according to Novalis' formula, "there are series of events which run parallel to real events. Men and circumstances generally modify the ideal train of circumstances, so that is seems imperfect; and their consequences are also equally imperfect. Thus it was with the Reformation; instead of Protestantism, we got Lutheranism.") These images show it the extent of its ordinary dissipation and the drawbacks that it offers for it. In the final analysis, it's not such a bad thing for these images to upset the mind, for to upset the mind is to put it in the wrong. The sentences I quote make ample provision for this. But the mind which relishes them draws therefrom the conviction that it is on the right track; on its own, the mind is incapable of finding itself guilty of cavil; it has nothing to fear, since, moreover, it attempts to embrace everything.

2nd. The mind which plunges into Surrealism relives with glowing excitement the best part of its childhood. For such a mind, it is similar to the certainty with which a person who is drowning reviews once more, in the space of less than a second, all the insurmountable moments of his life. Some may say to me that the parallel is not very encouraging. But I have no intention of encouraging those who tell me that. From childhood memories, and from a few others, there emanates a sentiment of being unintegrated, and then later of having gone astray, which I hold to be the most fertile that exists. It is perhaps childhood that comes closest to one's "real life"; childhood beyond which man has at his disposal, aside from his laissez-passer, only a few complimentary tickets; childhood where everything nevertheless conspires to bring about the effective, risk-free possession of oneself. Thanks to Surrealism, it seems that opportunity knocks a second time. It is as though we were still running toward our salvation, or our perdition. In the shadow we again see a precious terror. Thank God, it's still only Purgatory. With a shudder, we cross what the occultists call dangerous territory. In my wake I raise up monsters that are lying in wait; they are not yet too ill-disposed toward me, and I am not lost, since I fear them. Here are "the elephants with the heads of women and the flying lions" which used to make Soupault and me tremble in our boots to meet, here is the "soluble fish" which still frightens me slightly. POISSON SOLUBLE, am I not the soluble fish, I was born under the sign of Pisces, and man is soluble in his thought! The flora and fauna of Surrealism are inadmissible.

3rd. I do not believe in the establishment of a conventional Surrealist pattern any time in the near future. The characteristics common to all the texts of this kind, including those I have just cited and many others which alone could offer us a logical analysis and a careful grammatical analysis, do not preclude a certain evolution of Surrealist prose in time. Coming on the heels of a large number of essays I have written in this vein over the past five years, most of which I am indulgent enough to think are extremely disordered, the short anecdotes which comprise the balance of this volume offer me a glaring proof of what I am saying. I do not judge them to be any more worthless, because of that, in portraying for the reader the benefits which the Surrealist contribution is liable to make to his consciousness.

Surrealist methods would, moreover, demand to be

heard. Everything is valid when it comes to obtaining the desired suddenness from certain associations. The pieces of paper that Picasso and Braque insert into their work have the same value as the introduction of a platitude into a literary analysis of the most rigorous sort. It is even permissible to entitle POEM what we get from the most random assemblage possible (observe, if you will, the syntax) of headlines and scraps of headlines cut out of the newspapers:




POEM

A burst of laughter

of sapphire in the island of Ceylon

The most beautiful straws

HAVE A FADED COLOR

UNDER THE LOCKS

on an isolated farm

FROM DAY TO DAY

the pleasant

grows worse

coffee

preaches for its saint

THE DAILY ARTISAN OF YOUR BEAUTY

MADAM,

a pair

of silk stockings

is not

A leap into space

A STAG

Love above all

Everything could be worked out so well

PARIS IS A BIG VILLAGE

Watch out for

the fire that covers

THE PRAYER

of fair weather

Know that

The ultraviolet rays

have finished their task

short and sweet

THE FIRST WHITE PAPER

OF CHANCE

Red will be

The wandering singer

WHERE IS HE?

in memory

in his house

AT THE SUITORS’ BALL

I do

as I dance

What people did, what they’re going to do







And we could offer many many more examples. The theater, philosophy, science, criticism would all succeed in finding their bearings there. I hasten to add that future Surrealist techniques do not interest me.




Far more serious, in my opinion* (Whatever reservations I may be allowed to make concerning responsibility in general and the medico-legal considerations which determine an individual's degree of responsibility -- complete responsibility, irresponsibility, limited responsibility (sic) -- however difficult it may be for me to accept the principle of any kind of responsibility, I would like to know how the first punishable offenses, the Surrealist character of which will be clearly apparent, will be judged. Will the accused be acquitted, or will he merely be given the benefit of the doubt because of extenuating circumstances? It's a shame that the violation of the laws governing the Press is today scarcely repressed, for if it were not we would soon see a trial of this sort: the accused has published a book which is an outrage to public decency. Several of his "most respected and honorable" fellow citizens have lodged a complaint against him, and he is also charged with slander and libel. There are also all sorts of other charges against him, such as insulting and defaming the army, inciting to murder, rape, etc. The accused, moreover, wastes no time in agreeing with the accusers in "stigmatizing" most of the ideas expressed. His only defense is claiming that he does not consider himself to be the author of his book, said book being no more and no less than a Surrealist concoction which precludes any question of merit or lack of merit on the part of the person who signs it; further, that all he has done is copy a document without offering any opinion thereon, and that he is at least as foreign to the accused text as is the presiding judge himself.

What is true for the publication of a book will also hold true for a whole host of other acts as soon as Surrealist methods begin to enjoy widespread favor. When that happens, a new morality must be substituted for the prevailing morality, the source of all our trials and tribulations.) -- I have intimated it often enough -- are the applications of Surrealism to action. To be sure, I do not believe in the prophetic nature of the Surrealist word. "It is the oracle, the things I say."* (Rimbaud.) Yes, as much as I like, but what of the oracle itself?** (Still, STILL.... We must absolutely get to the bottom of this. Today, June 8, 1924, about one o'clock, the voice whispered to me: "Béthune, Béthune." What did it mean? I have never been to Béthune, and have only the vaguest notion as to where it is located on the map of France. Béthune evokes nothing for me, not even a scene from The Three Musketeers. I should have left for Béthune, where perhaps there was something awaiting me; that would have been to simple, really. Someone told me they had read in a book by Chesterton about a detective who, in order to find someone he is looking for in a certain city, simply scoured from roof to cellar the houses which, from the outside, seemed somehow abnormal to him, were it only in some slight detail. This system is as good as any other.

Similarly, in 1919, Soupault went into any number of impossible buildings to ask the concierge whether Philippe Soupault did in fact live there. He would not have been surprised, I suspect, by an affirmative reply. He would have gone and knocked on his door.) Men's piety does not fool me. The Surrealist voice that shook Cumae, Dodona, and Delphi is nothing more than the voice which dictates my less irascible speeches to me. My time must not be its time, why should this voice help me resolve the childish problem of my destiny? I pretend, unfortunately, to act in a world where, in order to take into account its suggestions, I would be obliged to resort to two kinds of interpreters, one to translate its judgements for me, the other, impossible to find, to transmit to my fellow men whatever sense I could make out of them. This world, in which I endure what I endure (don’t go see), this modern world, I mean, what the devil do you want me to do with it? Perhaps the Surrealist voice will be stilled, I have given up trying to keep track of those who have disappeared. I shall no longer enter into, however briefly, the marvelous detailed description of my years and my days. I shall be like Nijinski who was taken last year to the Russian ballet and did not realize what spectacle it was he was seeing. I shall be alone, very alone within myself, indifferent to all the world’s ballets. What I have done, what I have left undone, I give it to you.







And ever since I have had a great desire to show forbearance to scientific musing, however unbecoming, in the final analysis, from every point of view. Radios? Fine. Syphilis? If you like. Photography? I don’t see any reason why not. The cinema? Three cheers for darkened rooms. War? Gave us a good laugh. The telephone? Hello. Youth? Charming white hair. Try to make me say thank you: "Thank you." Thank you. If the common man has a high opinion of things which properly speaking belong to the realm of the laboratory, it is because such research has resulted in the manufacture of a machine or the discovery of some serum which the man in the street views as affecting him directly. He is quite sure that they have been trying to improve his lot. I am not quite sure to what extent scholars are motivated by humanitarian aims, but it does not seem to me that this factor constitutes a very marked degree of goodness. I am, of course, referring to true scholars and not to the vulgarizers and popularizers of all sorts who take out patents. In this realm as in any other, I believe in the pure Surrealist joy of the man who, forewarned that all others before him have failed, refuses to admit defeat, sets off from whatever point he chooses, along any other path save a reasonable one, and arrives wherever he can. Such and such an image, by which he deems it opportune to indicate his progress and which may result, perhaps, in his receiving public acclaim, is to me, I must confess, a matter of complete indifference. Nor is the material with which he must perforce encumber himself; his glass tubes or my metallic feathers… As for his method, I am willing to give it as much credit as I do mine. I have seen the inventor of the cutaneous plantar reflex at work; he manipulated his subjects without respite, it was much more than an "examination" he was employing; it was obvious that he was following no set plan. Here and there he formulated a remark, distantly, without nonetheless setting down his needle, while his hammer was never still. He left to others the futile task of curing patients. He was wholly consumed by and devoted to that sacred fever.

Surrealism, such as I conceive of it, asserts our complete nonconformism clearly enough so that there can be no question of translating it, at the trial of the real world, as evidence for the defense. It could, on the contrary, only serve to justify the complete state of distraction which we hope to achieve here below. Kant’s absentmindedness regarding women, Pasteur’s absentmindedness about "grapes," Curie’s absentmindedness with respect to vehicles, are in this regard profoundly symptomatic. This world is only very relatively in tune with thought, and incidents of this kind are only the most obvious episodes of a war in which I am proud to be participating. "Ce monde n’est que très relativement à la mesure de la pensée et les incidents de ce genre ne sont que les épisodes jusqu’ici les plus marquants d’une guerre d’indépendence à laquelle je me fais gloire de participer." Surrealism is the "invisible ray" which will one day enable us to win out over our opponents. "You are no longer trembling, carcass." This summer the roses are blue; the wood is of glass. The earth, draped in its verdant cloak, makes as little impression upon me as a ghost. It is living and ceasing to live which are imaginary solutions. Existence is elsewhere.


Reposted from thwe Original by Andre Breton

by

:icongromyko:
Surreally,Madly, Deeply in Love

The Concept of Love

The concept called Love have long puzzled even the most learned men ofthis Century and backwards.

In the fields of Art, Love have had many definitions.

Surrealism have looked upon this concept as a Sacred Act which one must learn to experience either directly or inderictly.

Breton once said that "Love must not be defiled".

Of all the surrealist efforts to deride society and to ridicle emotional experiences, love, like the Romanticists had been given a special place.

gromyko

:meditate:

:iconanubis46:
'VI - The Lovers' by AEDICULA-ARCANORUM

:icongromyko:
Esoteric Contemplation by gromyko

Defining Love

Love is any of a number of emotions and experiences related to a sense of strong affection[1] and attachment. The word love can refer to a variety of different feelings, states, and attitudes, ranging from generic pleasure to intense interpersonal attraction. The word love is both a verb and a noun. Love is not a single feeling but an emotion built from two or more feelings. Anything vital to us creates more than one feeling, and we also have feelings about our feelings (and thoughts about our feelings)[1]. This diversity of uses and meanings, combined with the complexity of the feelings involved, makes love unusually difficult to consistently define, even compared to other emotional states.

As an abstract concept, love usually refers to a deep, ineffable feeling of tenderly caring for another person. Even this limited conception of love, however, encompasses a wealth of different feelings, from the passionate desire and intimacy of romantic love to the nonsexual emotional closeness of familial and platonic love to the profound oneness or devotion of religious love. Love in its various forms acts as a major facilitator of interpersonal relationships and, owing to its central psychological importance, is one of the most common themes in the creative arts.



:iconhectorpineda:
:thumb101600604:

:icongreysmith:
La Gravedad del engranaje by greysmith

:icon413:
masquerade by 413


The English word "love" can have a variety of related but distinct meanings in different contexts. Often, other languages use multiple words to express some of the different concepts that English relies mainly on "love" to encapsulate; one example is the plurality of Greek words for "love." Cultural differences in conceptualizing love thus make it doubly difficult to establish any universal definition.

Although the nature or essence of love is a subject of frequent debate, different aspects of the word can be clarified by determining what isn't love. As a general expression of positive sentiment (a stronger form of like), love is commonly contrasted with hate (or neutral apathy); as a less sexual and more emotionally intimate form of romantic attachment, love is commonly contrasted with lust; and as an interpersonal relationship with romantic overtones, love is commonly contrasted with friendship, although other definitions of the word love may be applied to close friendships in certain contexts.

When discussed in the abstract, love usually refers to interpersonal love, an experience felt by a person for another person. Love often involves caring for or identifying with a person or thing, including oneself (cf. narcissism).

In addition to cross-cultural differences in understanding love, ideas about love have also changed greatly over time. Some historians date modern conceptions of romantic love to courtly Europe during or after the Middle Ages, although the prior existence of romantic attachments is attested by ancient love poetry.

Because of the complex and abstract nature of love, discourse on love is commonly reduced to a thought-terminating cliché, and there are a number of common proverbs regarding love, from Virgil's "Love conquers all" to The Beatles' "All you need is love." Bertrand Russell describes love as a condition of "absolute value," as opposed to relative value. Theologian Thomas Jay Oord said that to love is to "act intentionally, in sympathetic response to others, to promote overall well-being."


:iconasage:
New Beginnings by asage

:iconjanellemckain: :iconbernardumaine: :iconsheelasingla:
:thumb96423950:

:iconkolaboy:
A Kiss For Rotting Summer by kolaboy

Share you love with Us!!!!

G
:icongromyko:

A Belated Valentine's Day To All
The Aesthetics of Beauty
A Periscopical Review




What is beauty?

Beauty is the spiritual dimension of reality made manifest to our senses. Through the workings of beauty we can actually see, hear, touch, taste and smell that there is something deeper, a more profound level of existence, offering meaning, consolation and hope. In beauty the veil of our ordinariness and shallowness is for a moment lifted. By way of the senses we catch a glimpse of a more perfect world beyond. Beauty also effects our feelings and insights in a transformative way. After a profound esthetic experience we are not the same anymore. In this confrontation with beauty our perspective of the world, even our very self, is altered.

These two aspects of the aesthetic experience, the unraveling of the spiritual dimension of life, together with its transformation of our ordinary consciousness to a higher level, are closely linked and mutually affect each other. Spirituality seems to be beautiful and beauty seems to be spiritual. And as spirituality can be defined as the science of realizing higher levels of consciousness, we can deduce that beauty collaborates in this process, beauty being one of the attributes of Spirit. This might explain why most artists have an inclination to philosophy and spirituality and also why so many mystics were creative artists in their lifetime. Art and Spirit seem to be brothers working together as scientists of higher forms of awareness.


Spirit exposed to the senses

Spirit is both the unifying and the multifying source of all phenomena. It is both the beginning (multifying) and the end (unifying) of all objects. Everything we contact with comes from Spirit and is heading towards Spirit. But in the process of manifestation the source and the end of the emanating object become obscured. Its essence hides itself, like a veil, from our senses and our perceiving knowledge. Our senses fail to perceive what the object is in its own right. In reality all objects are objectifications and formations of Spirit. Beauty is the trace left by Spirit in the object, at sense level, reminding us of its true nature and origin. This in itself is a great beauty, that we, already at sense level, can perceive in the objects their final ground and telos. But to become aware of this spiritual dimension our senses need to be refined, need to be opened. For not everyone, and not everyone all the time, is able to sense this innate spiritual quality of all objects right from the start. This is because of our relative consciousness also being an object of Spirit, and therefore subjected to the same obfuscation and oblivion as any other object. So our senses need to be educated and refined first to perceive the deeper dimension lying behind their phenomenal appearance. Beauty has the purpose of introducing us into this dimension and to provide us with this education. Through the shocking and awakening effect of beauty we sense that there is something more going on than mere surfaces and appearances. Through the beauty of an object our senses are magnified to a higher level, where they can sense the unreality of the one isolated object and perceive its ramifications in a much wider context.

This is the true beauty of an object, that it takes us away from its isolation and points to wider connections of beauty. Beauty leads upward, to the ideation of the object, where it is lifted up from its particular to its universal meaning. So the beauty of an object (say, a painting, a woman) is never beautiful in its own right, but because it points to a relatedness with other beautiful objects, at first with other objects of its kind (other beautiful paintings etc.), then to all beautiful objects and finally to Beauty itself. So beauty connects the beautiful object to its wider network, whence its value is derived. To perceive this wider network is already abstraction from the senses, is philosophy and not sensory experience. But in order to value beauty this abstraction has to occur. We might see, hear etc. beauty, but in order to derive value from our experience we need to transcend our senses and integrate our experience at the higher level of mind and, ultimately, soul.

This explains why we enjoy more when we know and feel more. We are more able to detect the beauty of an object when we know how to place the object in such a wider context of relatedness. A painting might to the highest degree be beautiful in its own right, but its value and our enjoyment of its value increase when we know something of its history and of the history of art in general. Through our knowledge of its wider context, its beauty is not only revealed but also intensified. This is because of the deepening of the subject in apprehending the wider ramifications of such embedded beauty. Altering the subject of perceiving (our awareness of beauty) thus heightens the value of the object itself. So the quality of an object seems to depend also on the quality of the subject perceiving it, according to the final unity of subject and object.

This brings us to deduce that the subject with the highest quality, the one connected in sense, mind and soul with Spirit, is the one best able to detect and value beauty in the world. For, like we said in the beginning, beauty is Spirit made manifest to the senses. But -this is important in any theory of aesthetics- the senses themselves are but mere instruments in the process. They are in their instrumentality incapable of evaluating and understanding the more hidden aspects of reality, like beauty. It takes higher levels of awareness to appreciate these higher (deeper) levels of reality and here it is where the mind and eventually the soul of the perceiving subject play their role. Beauty is about the value of the object. It takes a valuing subject to detect it. So the quality of the subject is of paramount importance.

Is beauty an innate quality of the object itself or is beauty merely accorded to the object by the perceiving and evaluating subject? Or, to give an example, will the flower or the woman lose their beauty (cease being beautiful) once we stop perceiving and admiring them? Now I think the correct answer to this question cannot be given in the or/or mode, but is highly non dual: the presence of beauty depends on the object and the subject. There is the more beauty, both in presence and perceiving, when both the radiating beauty of the object and the perceiving beauty of the subject have become one single process; when the beauty of both object and subject reflect the deeper quality of both object and subject alike. So it needs a beautiful subject to disclose this deeper quality of the object. But also the quality of the object discloses the beauty of the subject. It works both ways.

But since beauty is a value, a hidden meaning, it belongs to the sphere of (inter)subjective interpretation, hermeneutics and phenomenological aethetics, to disclose it. These secondary processes are not simply modes of perceiving. These are modes of mentally and a posteriori reconstructing the sense experience. So merely perceiving is not enough to detect beauty. The eye of the intellect must also shine its light on the object, for beauty can only be detected when the mind chooses to do so. The mind is the instrument to class opposites in dual columns. As beauty has ugliness as its counterpart, beauty must first be set aside from the ugly (the repugnant etc.) by the mind. So something is only beautiful when the mind has decided it is. Not before.   

But this is not the whole story, at least not within an aesthetics that wants to go beyond a mere rationalism. For such an aesthetics would easily be critizised for reducing beauty to being merely intellectual, while in fact beauty is a value that reaches out to levels higher than the mind, like we all know and feel when confronted with something deeply beautiful. Beauty in the mind is only half way. We have to go to Spirit itself to find the true meaning of beauty. It is like Plato said: the beauty of the phenomenon points to its higher class, the highest Idea of Beauty, or beyond, to Spirit itself. And Spirit can only contemplatively be detected by levels higher than the mind. It is here, in the more subtle levels of our soul, that we can truly appreciate beauty. Because beauty is more of a felt value. It is more of the heart than of the mind. Sometimes it can only come to the heart by way of the mind, but only in the heart is its proper value detected. This is because Spirit detects Itself in the beautiful. And this can only be done by the faculty of our being that is the closest to Spirit, which is the soul.

But here in our soul we have reached the highest levels of beauty. Let´s go back downwards a bit and first describe what beauty is like at the lower levels, before climbing all the way up to Spirit. For even at the lower levels of the material and the first impulses of life we do find beauty, because of Spirit being immanent to all being. In everything we can detect the ´vestigium dei´, God´s footprint, even among rocks and minerals.


The material

Though the material is the most hidden and condensed form of Brahman, still the eye trained in beauty can, even here at this rudimentary level, detect some higher qualities, that at first glance might escape the eye. These qualities are always of a secondary nature, depending more on the reflection of Spirit than on Its essence. Because of its gross nature, Spirit is locked up, as it were, in the material. Only at the highest level of non-dual awareness can we contemplate its oneness and equation with Spirit. But here already at sense level secondary qualities disclose Its presence. First the vastness or plenitude of the material might strike the eye as beautiful, like when we see enormous formations of rock, stretching out far beyond our horizon. Or when at sea we are awed by the sheer immensity of the water lying beneath our feet. Or the enormous piles of sand we see being whirled around in the desert. These views of material nature might even be sublime, when they disclose to the eye of contemplation the greatness and overpowering enormity of creation. Wanderers in the mountains often report being overwhelmed by Spirit, because of  the greatness of the landscape and its material nature. In meeting nature the vastness of the material makes us feel small and great the same time. The huge mountain seems to be the image of God.

But this is not to say that the enjoyment of nature, or a fortiori nature mysticism, is provoked by the material in nature. The material in nature, being on the lowest rung of the ladder, is always some sort of a disappointment to the eye. The aesthetic eye always looks for life beyond the mere material and glorifies when it sees one tiny ant crawling its way among the tons of desert sand beneath our feet, or discovers remnants of green life among the gray rocks of high altitude. Landscapes devoid of all life are difficult to bear to the eye. Only souls accustomed to the emptiness of Spirit are able to detect beauty in lifeless nature. But still, beauty is there. Because there is no place (nor time) where (when) Spirit is not.

Reading this one comes to understand why the artist so much wants to imbue the material, the lifeless, with life and strains his muscles for months on end to give life to death stone or death metal. For the eye rejoices in finding life even in the lifeless. Precisely this is the core activity of the aesthetic prehension, that it searches for the higher in the lower even at the lowest level, so to reassure itself that the lower is not devoid of the higher. Before all else, before we look at the form of a work of art per se, we subconsciously are awed by the fact that this beauty we see before us is nothing but death material brought to life. ´Behold! Even dead rocks can be alive!´, we say to ourselves when looking at the David of Michelangelo. We feel the artist is consoling us in making us realize that there is no such thing as dead lifelessness. Even lifelessness can be brought to life, because, like everything in the universe, it is not disconnected from Spirit. Thus the primal metaphysical impact of art in the esthetic experience.


Prana: emotio-sexual life force (1)

One level higher than the material is the unseen force of the biological, Bergson´s elan vital, Schopenhauer´s Will. Here we see lifeless entities suddenly permeated by mysterious life force, that makes them act, intend, will and procreate. This is the level of the instincts, the passions, Freud´s libido and thanatos drives. This prana is something of a dark force, because of its uncontrollable strength and invincibility. It is impossible for living creatures to oppose it. Being objectifications of this life force they are forever subject to its workings. At this level the organism is fundamentally unfree, being not an a priori subjectifications but an a posteriori objectivication. Prana rules the organism and not the other way around.

This is for aesthetics a paradoxical situation, because it makes prana ugly as well as beautiful at the same time. Prana is ugly because it tends to devour and deconstruct its individual objectifications, its life forms, and reduces them once again to the nothingness they essentially are. For prana is not interested in individual life forms, but in the continuation of its own energy. Any individual form is disposable to the emotio-sexual force. It lets them grow old and die. So the ugliness of prana is its tragic nature. Every life form is a small tragedy performed on a small stage in a small amount of time. In the wink of an eye the play is over, never to be performed again. And one is left wondering what´s the meaning of the play or why this play at all. The destruction eventually bought about by the life force doesn´t seem to make any sense at all, at least not from the perspective of the individual life form.

This is the ugly part of prana, perceived with the utmost intensity in sexuality. There is a great sadness in sexuality, because of its fundamentally unfree character. The slavery of prana makes us feel ashamed, repressive of our basic drives, even aggressive at everything seducing us to it. We feel out of control, subjected to the blind force playing havoc within our soul. We cannot but give in to this life force, though it exhausts, depletes us and make us think of death, because it makes us aware of being mortal. As prana is concerned we are nothing but a piece of domino about to fall. The stone has to give way to create the greater picture. But on the verge of toppling over we, the individuals, feel sick and nauseous.

Though elaborate Romantic philosophies have been composed to glorify the unrelenting force of the emotio-sexual, as if it were God itself, it is a sad conclusion that we cannot but feel disappointed and unsatisfied when life is lived at this level only. Though emotions do need to have there right place -it is extremely dangerous to suppress them- our heart yearns for a transcendence. We search the quiet and the silence that we may avoid the stimuli of emotional life, to find relieve from the wearisome, forever ongoing workings of biological time.


Duality

Here a word needs to be inserted about the fundamental dual character of all levels of being below Spirit. As we already saw when discussing the esthetics of the material, every level of being can be considered to be both ugly and beautiful, both in itself and in its valuation, depending on which side of the coin we wish to highlight. In our first discussion the material appeared as ugly in its lifelessness, but as beautiful as well, in its reflection of life, aye, even as sublime when it was seen, in its vastness and enormity, as a direct manifestation of Spirit. Such dual characteristics we will meet all the way up to the subtle level of being. Any theory of esthetics dealing not sufficiently with both the ugly and the beautiful aspects of all phenomena will therefore be incomplete in itself. At a superficial glance this might seem to be self-contradictory -how can something be ugly as well as beautiful?- but we must never forget that everything in life comes in pairs and that in all things beautiful there is something of the repulsive, like there is some attraction in the abhorrent also.


Prana: emotio-sexual life force (2)

This being said it will not strike the reader as odd when we describe the pranic life force as very beautiful at the same time, not only because it is, like everything else in creation, a manifestation of Spirit, but also because it has merits and satisfactions of its own. For this play of life and death, of blooming and withering, of production and depletion, cannot fail to move the heart of the observer, when she sees the joy, the energy and the ecstasy Spirit has bestowed on the world with this Its pranic force. It would be platitudinous to describe life in its springtime and mature versions as beautiful. For who does not feel the shivers of emotion in his heart when holding young life in his hand or when walking through the lavish green of a springtime forest? But let´s notice the fact that life in decay has beauty of its own also. Autumn also delights the heart. There are beautiful dimensions in the sadness of grief and death also. The sensitive heart knows that there is beauty in holding a lifeless corpse to its bosom, though it might seem repulsive at first glance. Who has not felt the joy of religious feelings and enlightenment when attending the bed of the dying? For death is nothing but the approach of Spirit. And eventually all life passes away into this emptiness of Love, where it is for ever redeemed in the katharsis of its own nothingness. So the decline of life can be just as beautiful as its ascent.  

The biological life force stirs up all kinds of emotions, instinctual, perceptual or reflective. These emotions are closely linked to the drives and the demands of the individual organism. They are its way to cope with the environment and to preserve itself in the face of dangers and threats. Emotions are biologically necessary. If you would not be emotional, you would not manage to stay alive. This is the beauty of emotions, that they are very apt in protecting and securing all individual life. But this is its ugliness at the same time. For prana is, despite its own glory, still a low level of life, calling for a transcendence, despite the satisfaction it may give. In pranic emotions Spirit is confined to the individuality of the one single organism. At this level life is always self centered. This puts emotional values at a lower range in the hierarchy, lower than eg. mental values or soul values. They are necessary but limited. When life is lived only at the emotional level of prana, self-actualization and self-transcendence tend to be excluded.

There is no need to muster up the examples of hate, jealousy, ambition and all other kinds of negative emotions of self-preservation to back up this theory. They speak for themselves. But also the more positive emotions, like the drive to procreate, romantic love or the merriments of the bed, lend evidence to the claim that pranic emotions are ugly in the sense that they represent lower values. For these pranic emotions serve to preserve the species. But to do so they must create a hoax: the individual organism must be beguiled into thinking that he has these emotions in the service of himself, while they in fact serve the purpose of dispensing him. The needs of the species lay a heavy claim on the self of the individual. And a lot of time and energy has to be spent with the nerve wrecking task of rearing and taking care of offspring. This explains for the disappointed looks in the face of parents, pregnant women and newly wed grooms. Deep down in their soul they have the feeling that this is somehow a trick that is being played on them, something beyond their control that they have been lured into. Of all the repressed emotions this existential disappointment about the rewards and happiness of procreation is the most fundamental and therefore the last one that is admitted to the self. Prana does not want these doubts to enter consciousness. This is one of the thickest veils covering up Pure Consciousness.

The same can be said of other positive emotions like the thrills of winning, success and achievement. Here the individual is hoaxed into thinking that he can for ever escape the dualities of life by putting his finger on one side of the coin and forcefully clinging to it. But every success is followed by its shadow and relatively happy periods are followed by sad ones, according to the oscillating ground movement of all pranic life. Everything sooner or later will turn into its own opposite. So the sensitive and aesthetic observer sees something ugly in the jolly cheering of the crowds, knowing that these same emotions have the potentiality to flip over into hate, aggression and destructiveness. For all pranic emotions are caught up in endless dualities and the one cannot go without the other. Here the emotions create all kinds of sorrow and distress, though they started off with the good prospect of hope.


The mental  

No, the emotions definitely call for a transcendence, for the true beauty of life is not given its fullest scope when remaining stuck at pranic level. So life moves onward, up towards its highest goal, which is the unification with and of Spirit. To reach these highest levels of human development, an abstraction, a distance, even some sort of an overcoming is necessary. This does not mean that we have to give up on life, or be done with it, no, the higher, more beautiful life starts when we begin to look at life, as if some essential part of our self were not involved in it. For Spirit is essentially observant pure consciousness, the Witness of all life. When happiness and beauty are defined as qualities of approaching Spirit, then it follows that our relative consciousness has to adopt this observant, onlooking quality in order to become beautiful and happy. This is the reason that almost all religions have propagated techniques for training the observant quality of our consciousness (like eg. the vipassana of Buddhism).

Now this observant, onlooking quality starts at the mental level. Here consciousness begins to think about life, starts to form theories, abstracts from the data of perception by replacing them with signs and symbols and lays down rules, however tentative, to explain ´how it works´. The data are subsumed into higher classes, which makes it more possible for consciousness to operate on them. All these mental operations are nothing but a stepping back of consciousness from the gross level of existence. This brings consciousness closer to its source, because such onlooking, such theorizing, such abstraction of the concrete into the symbolic, makes consciousness more pure, which makes the way for Pure Consciousness itself. The beauty mental operations is leaving things out, till finally by a process of trimming and subsuming the oneness of all things is perceived in the beatific vision, which is the experience of Beauty itself.

So the scientific level of being -the mental- is essentially characterized by a retreat of consciousness. Bit by bit consciousness steps back from its immanent involvement into the world and starts looking, first to ´the facts out there´, then to ´the facts in here´ and finally to the workings of consciousness itself and its first emanations into the mind. So the higher levels of  being and consciousness are always an abstraction, enabling consciousness to operate on the world from a distance. This abstraction enables consciousness to predict, control and create the lower levels of the biological and the material. And this is precisely the thing science does: it procures lordship over everything below the mental. For every transcendence of a certain level is a control over the lower levels also.

This is the beauty of the mental: the mental is able to create a beautiful order in the chaotic complexities of material and biological emanations and by doing so it creates order in itself also. Here beauty is a certain elegance in the correspondence between fact and theory. The more elegance and validation a theory offers, the truer it is. This is the order that puts our mind at rest and makes our thinking clear and alert. Like with beauty at pranic sense level the mind is elated when it sees correlations, correspondences, mutual proportions and similarities between the different parts of a given theory and between different theories. Here, like with esthetic perception, the mind searches for a way to bring different parts under one heading. When it succeeds in doing so it has brought about a simplification of life, which is the main purpose of its working. For the purpose of all life is to come back to more simple oneness.

But the mental is not the omega point of life. It is not the aim that life is seeking. The mind is only a tool in finding the aim and reaching out for it. It is a higher level, but it is not the highest level. So things can go wrong, pathologies may occur, when the mental is seen as the highest level of beauty in life. True beauty cannot be found by the mind (alone). When we try to do so and do not employ higher faculties in finding beauty, we will never find the most beautiful thing that is to be found in life, which is Spirit.

For like we said, everything below the causal is caught up in endless dualities and the beauty of the one moment may be the ugliness of the next. So instead of reducing the complexities of life we often find mind augmenting them, by creating extra complexities. The mind may create problems of its own, besides the problems life already has to offer. The worries, the fears and the irrationalities of pranic life may be redoubled by wrong mental attitudes and by the reading of maladapted ´mental scripts´ that offer an unhealthy and false interpretation of life. Here the mind creates psychological time. It runs wild and breaks loose, like a wild untamed horse. Instead of falling back into the ground of its own emptiness the mind may create a life of its own, no more under our control. Instead of being a beautiful instrument for higher purposes, it may become an ugly distrophic tyrant in our heads.


The soul

This happens when psychological development is thwarted and the mind is not transcended by the next higher level: the soul. For the soul can detect more beauty in life than the mind is ever able the find. For the mind is the logical instrument we have at our disposal to sift the right from the false. The mind can discover truth. But the soul is more essential still, because it is even more closer to Spirit. It is so closely connected to the first attributive emanations of Spirit, that it can do a lot more than just discern right from false. It can find essential and existential meaning. With our soul we search for what is worthwhile and what is worthless in our lives. This we cannot find out with our mind alone. We somehow have to find a meaning that goes beyond mere rational understanding. This meaning is more of an intuition than a deduction or an inference from data.

This intuition of the soul is also our guide in matters concerning ethics. Here at this level our moral conscience is located. The soul is one of the first emanations of Spirit and is very close to the first Forms. Being so highly ranked in the chain of Being it is very near to Justice and Goodness itself and can more easily discover its characteristics. So goodness and righteousness are first felt with the heart (our soul), before our mind becomes aware of it. Our heart knows already what the right thing is to do. So a highly developed and mature human being, well grounded in soul and with a loving and open heart, knows already by intuition what course she is to follow. This she already intuits in her own deepest nature, way before becoming aware of it.

Here at this high transrational level of soul our esthetic intuitions are also to be found.  For discerning the beautiful from the ugly is also something we cannot achieve with the mind (alone), though the mind can surely be an aid in the process. But as with ethics: the person in touch with her heart and soul knows by intuition what is beautiful. She doesn´t need the mind to tell her so. Beautiful things must in one way or another reflect the order, the depth and the meaning of this transrational level to be beautiful. So esthetics is more of a comparison. It compares with closed eyes the beauty of a thing with the beauty spotted inside. If there is correspondence, we say that something is beautiful. When there is no correspondence, we call it ugly (or not beautiful yet). So esthetics is like ethics grounded in our soul. Here we intuit its truths.

When we call intuitions the ground of all our judgments, be they scientific, moral or esthetic, we point to the fact that our soul, as the source of all our intuitions, is the dominant controller of the mental level. For being a higher transcendence it is, like all lower levels, able to operate on the next lower level in the hierarchy. So intuitions are operations of transmental consciousness upon mental consciousness. They are the determinants of our reason. The mental has to work them out to make them understandable and transparent to us. But they are the great instigators of reasoning and judgment. As such their being and becoming are something of a mystery. We feel these intuitions to emanate from Spirit, but how exactly we do not know. It is part of ´how life works´.


Spirit

All things are essentially - and are finally brought back to- Oneness of Spirit. Here at the highest level of being the greatest beauty in life is to be found. Below this level something is still missing. Below Spirit beauty still has its shortcomings, its flaws, its contradictions and can only be detected in dualistic opposition to ugliness. But here at this highest, non dual level, beauty is seen as the interconnectedness of all things, including ugliness and evil. Beauty is here the transcendence of all things into their final ground of Oneness. The highest esthetic pleasure and satisfaction can only be found when consciousness finally reaches these highest levels. This is the level of no-judgment, of choiceless awareness. Here everything is seen as tathata, as ´the way things are´. Here nothing is secluded from the scope of beauty. Here Spirit looks at creation and ´sees that all is good´. When the wings of our soul have finally soared up to the peak of this mountain, only peace and satisfaction remain. Life and death here are extremely and ultimately beautiful.

This transcendence is not only a transcendence but an immanence also. It is not only the peak. It is the whole mountain and the valleys below. The peak cannot be separated from the mountain and its surroundings. There is no ultimate beauty without the lower levels of ugliness, duality, suffering and failing being one way or the other included into it. This would be a great misconception and has been the major flaw in the history of religion and spirituality, the idea that beauty could only be realized in transcending and separating ourselves from the lower. Perhaps this conception is necessary when still on a dual level of development -in order to make a transcendence possible- but when the transcendence is finally realized, this conception proves itself to be ultimately false. For beauty is everywhere. It is the very fabric this universe is made of.

Then all words cease. At this level only enjoyment and deep ecstasy remain.


Excerpted from an Essay in the Site: mysticism.nl

*Note:

The Following texts have been reviewed by Gromyko Semper and he believes that somehow the Periscopical Artists could relate into this definitive explanation in relation to his personal quest towards understanding the Meaning of Beauty from the most material to the highest Spiritual Aspect of Human Existence.

Periscopical Artists will benifit strongly after reading this and relating it to his works.
Imagine the Imagination

By
GRomyko Semper
:icongromyko:


IMAGINATION


What is the faculty of mind from which springs the kind of repetition developed in art when elaborated in accordance with the principle of representation. What is it but the imagination, the faculty which has to do with the imaging of one thing in or by another? In an art-product, forms are grouped together because imagination perceives that they are alike or allied, in other words that they compare, either exactly or very nearly. If, for the sake of variety, a few subordinate features are introduced of which this is not true, even then the clearest possible consciousness that comparison is the process and that these features are exceptional, is manifested by the fact that they are acknowledged to be introduced artistically in the degree in which they exactly contrast with the other features. But no one can originate or recognize a contrast,—which is an effect caused by agreement in many features but disagreement in, at least, one feature,—except as a result of comparison, which itself is merely the mode of procedure of imagination.




IMAGINATION, AS AFFECTED BY REPRESENTATION AND IMITATION


It is precisely for this reason, too, because art does and can represent, and does not and need not literally imitate, that the faculty through which it exerts its chief influence upon the mind, as has been so often observed but seldom explained, is the imagination. A literal imitation, leaving nothing for the imagination to do, does not stimulate its action. Whistles or bells in music; common-place phrases or actions in poetry; and indiscriminate particularities of detail in the work of pencil, brush, or chisel, usually produce disenchanting effects entirely aside from those that we feel to be legitimate to art. This is largely because the artist, in using them, has forgotten that his aim is not to imitate but to represent. It is well to observe here, too, that an effect, appealing primarily to the imagination, necessarily passes through it into all the faculties of mind; and therefore that the distinctive interest awakened in them all by works of art is really due to that which affects first the imagination.




IMAGINATION, AS AIDING SCIENCE



The mind that can make discoveries of great truths and principles is, as a rule, the mind that, when it can advance no longer, step by step, can wing itself into these unexplored regions. How can it do this? Through imagination. How can imagination, when doing it, detect the truth? According to a law of being which makes the mind of man work in harmony with the mind in nature, which makes an imaginative surmisal with reference to material things a legitimate product of an intelligent understanding of them. This is the law of correspondence or analogy, which can often sweep a man's thoughts entirely beyond that which is a justifiable scientific continuation of the impression received from nature. Only in art is the mind necessitated and habituated to recognize this law, which fact may not only suggest a reason why so many successful inventors have started in life, like Fulton, Morse, and Bell, by making a study of some form of art; but it may almost justify a general statement that no great discovery is possible to one whose mind is not able to go beyond that which is ordinarily done in science.
Imagination is a forerunner of investigation; and investigation furnishes an impetus to imagination. For this reason a great thinker, whether a poet or a philosopher, although he will incline to the one method or to the other, according to the bent of his genius, must not be wholly deficient in the qualities that go to make up either. Nor, so far as education can atone for deficiency, will his education be complete until he has cultivated the powers that go to make up both. Goethe was a student of science; and his poetry owes much to his scientific studies. Dante and Milton were scientific in their poetry, and Plato and Spinoza were poetic in their philosophies. As Sir Wm. Hamilton says, in the thirty-third of his "Lectures on Metaphysics": "A vigorous power of representation is as indispensable a condition of success in the abstract sciences as in the poetical and plastic arts; and it may accordingly be reasonably doubted whether Aristotle or Homer were possessed of the more powerful imagination.



IMAGINATION, AS INFLUENCED BY MUSIC VS. POETRY.


Literature belongs to the department of art. This fact necessitates its appealing, not—as science does—to the understanding through direct statements with reference to ideas or emotions, but to the imagination through forms representative of these. In other words, the imagination thinks of that which art presents, by perceiving images which appear in the mind. But in different arts these images are awakened in different ways. The inarticulated sounds heard in music start within one a general emotive tendency—active or restful, triumphant or desponding, gay or sad, as the case may be—and this tendency influences the general direction of thought; but exactly what the form of the thought—or the image—shall be, the mind is left free to determine for itself. If a reciter forget to appeal to imagination according to the methods of sound, he ceases to have that drift which is necessary in order to draw into the channel of his thought, and sweep onward, as music does, the emotions of his audience. If he forget to appeal to imagination according to the methods of sight, i. e., to remember to what an extent his words, and each word in its place, must cause his audience to think in pictures, then his motive, being merely musical, begins to have the effect legitimate to music. It either lulls people to sleep or, if not, at least leaves their minds free to deter-mine for themselves what shall be the substance of their thought.



IMAGINATION, THE SOURCE OF ART.


Art is distinctively a product of imagination, of that faculty of the mind which has to do with perceiving images, —the image of one thing in the form of another. While science, therefore, may find a single form interesting in itself, art, at its best, never does. It looks for another form with which the first may be compared. While science may be satisfied with a single fact, art, at its best, never is. It demands a parallel fact or fancy, of which the first furnishes a suggestion.


GPS2008
ART AND REALITY


Could one imagine art which had nothing to do with persons?

Could one imagine art which had nothing to do with other persons?

Could one imagine art which had nothing to do with concrete situations?

Could one imagine the existence of concrete situations without the existence of things?

Could one imagine concrete situations with persons in which the behavior of persons had no significance?

There is no meaning in talking about art without imagining persons, their behavior, things and concrete situations. When one wants to talk about art, one must therefore talk about: persons and their behavior with other persons and things in concrete situations. As a precondition that these persons are actually practicing this behavior at all, one has to imagine that they are experiencing it as meaningful. From this follows that one has to talk about: persons and their meaningful behavior with other persons and things in concrete situations. There is reason to presume that this always stands when one talks about art. Otherwise one would be able to imagine:

art which has nothing to do with persons

art which no one finds meaningful and which therefore has no significance

art which has nothing to do with the behavior of persons

art which has nothing to do with other persons

art which has nothing to do with things

art which has nothing to do with concrete situations

art which has nothing to do with persons and their behavior, meaningfulness, other persons, things and concrete situations.

Therefore we now know that:
when one talks about art one must always talk about:

Persons and their meaningful behavior with other persons and things in concrete situations

or about corresponding factors with the same significance and the same necessary relations.

This knowledge enables us to talk about art in a way that makes sense, and without allowing habitual conceptions, social conventions and concentrations of power to be of decisive importance to our experiences.



Notes:

Persons


A person can be described in an infinite number of ways. None of these descriptions can be completely adequate. We therefore can not describe precisely what a person is. Whichever way we describe a person, we do however have the possibility to point out necessary relations between persons and other factors. We have to respect these relations and factors in order not to contradict ourselves and in order to be able to talk about persons in a meaningful way.
One necessary relation is the logical relation between persons and bodies. It makes no sense to refer to a person without referring to a body. If we for example say: here we have a person, but he or she does not have a body, it does not make sense. Furthermore, there are necessary relations between persons and the rights of persons. Persons should be treated as persons and therefore as having rights. If we deny this assertion it goes wrong: here is a person, but this person should not be treated as a person, or: here is a person, who should be treated as a person, but not as having rights. Therefore we can only talk about persons in a way that makes sense if we know that persons have rights.

When one does not respect the rights of persons, then one can not respect art, as we know that art is inextricably bound up with persons.


Concrete situations

Concrete situations are the precondition of any use of language, because we know that an assertion can only be understood as something that is made by a person in a concrete situation. If for example we say: here we have an assertion, but this assertion was not made by a person in a concrete situation, it does not make sense. We can, in other words, not refer to anything without referring to concrete situations.
Concrete situations are what we talk about all the time, what we take for granted. We for example say: they sat there and they were fine. Nothing is as easy as identifying concrete situations via persons, mental states and the things of daily life in space and time. At the same time it is absolutely impossible to describe a concrete situation in an exhaustive way. This thing that a situation can be described in a vast number of ways is not an accidental property of situations, but on the contrary it is what characterizes situations. A situation that can be described in only one way is not a situation. When we try to define a situation based on one single description we prevent ourselves from experiencing it.
There is no reason to believe that a request to art that it should continue to find new forms is relevant. The historical consideration that such a request will have to be founded on, requires an impossible comparison of situations. History is concerned with descriptions from specific points of view and is not reality. In the attempt to compare situations, one reduces situations to something that can be fully understood. This is not in compliance with our knowledge of situations. If one attempts to define what art is, one only sees one's own description of it, and this description can never be exhaustive.


Things


Things have significance for concrete situations: when we say: here we have a concrete situation, but no things are of significance to this situation, this is not in compliance with our experiences.


Significance


Though concrete situations can only be identified in space and time, they can not be reduced to only existing in space and time. In any concrete situation significance plays a decisive role. If we say: they sat there and they were fine, but nothing was of significance, it does not make sense. Significance is decisive for concrete situations, but significance does not exist in time and space. What is the durability of significance and where does it exist? We do not know what significance is, but we know that significance is something which is decisive to our experience of the world. If we do not assign persons, their behavior, things and concrete situations any significance, then there is no reason to concern oneself with persons, their behaviour, things and concrete situations.

If one does not assign persons, their behavior, things and concrete situations significance, there is no reason to be concerned with art. Art has significance for our daily existence, because persons, their behavior, things and concrete situations have significance for our daily existence.


Logic


Most of our thinking and our discussions are conducted on a level where we repeat and repeat our habitual conceptions to each other. We assume that there are no other conditions to decide whether something is right or wrong, except that one does not contradict oneself nor is inconsistent with facts. Beyond this there exists only more or less thoroughly grounded subjective opinions. However, there is a level so basic that it normally does not appear in our conscious mind, where everything does not revolve around subjective opinions. At this level things are simply right or wrong.
Logical relations are the most basic and most overlooked phenomenon we know. Nothing of which we can talk rationally can exist, can be identified or referred to, except through its logical relations to other things. Logic is necessary relations between different factors, and factors are what exist by the force of those relations. The decisive thing about logical relations is that they can not be reasoned. Nevertheless, they do constitute conditions necessary for any description, because they can not be denied without rejecting the factors of the relations. Persons are, for example, totally different from their bodies. Persons can go for a walk and they can make decisions. Bodies can not do that. Nevertheless, we can not refer to persons without referring to their bodies. If we say: here we have a person, but he or she unfortunately is lacking a body, it does not make sense. Persons are totally different from the concrete situations they are in. Nevertheless, we can not refer to persons without referring to the situations they are in. If we say: here we have a person, but this person has never been in a concrete situation, it does not make sense. Language is totally different from reality. Nevertheless, we have to perceive language as something that can be used to talk about reality. If we say: here we have a language, but this language can not be used to talk about reality, it does not make sense. Logical relations have decisive significance. The absence of logical relations would mean that nothing could be of decisive significance: as long as one does not contradict oneself nor is inconsistent with facts, any point of view may be as good as the next, one can say and mean anything. Logical relations are conditions for talking rationally together. The part of the world we can talk rationally about, can thus be defined as the part we can talk about using logical relations. But we do not have any reason to assume that the world is identical with what we can talk rationally about. Logic is something more basic than language. Logical relations are what makes language a language and what assigns meaning to words. Therefore, it is impossible to learn a language, without learning to respect logical relations. But as we grow up and learn to master language, logical relations are not present on a conscious level. If we are conscious of logical relations, it is possible for us to decide whether something is right or wrong and not to allow ourselves to be ruled by for example habitual conceptions and subjective opinions.

When one wants to talk about art in a way that makes sense and without allowing oneself to be ruled by for example habitual conceptions and subjective opinions, one has to respect the logical relations and the factors which have to do with art. Therefore one has to talk about persons' meaningful behavior with other persons and things in concrete situations, when one talks about art. There is no reason to believe that what we can talk rationally about when we are talking about art, is exhaustive to what we talk about when we are talking about art.


Norms


Norms are the expression of objective knowledge. Objective knowledge is that which can not be denied. Norms are in contradiction to the view that everything depends on subjective opinions, and that one therefore can do or say anything, as long as one observes social conventions. Norms are the things we can not disagree about. Norms will always be valid. The fundamental ethical norm is that persons have rights. We are unable to talk about ethics in a way that makes sense without respecting this norm. The fundamental ethical norm does not tell us exactly what we should choose in concrete situations. Strictly speaking, this norm only tells us that persons should be treated as having rights. But if we do not observe this norm we do away with persons and the rights of persons.

It is a norm for art that when one talks about art one has to talk about persons and their meaningful behavior with other persons and things in concrete situations. By respecting this norm one can create space for art, without consideration to social conventions. This is important because social conventions do not always respect norms. Subjective opinions about art can have significance, but one should not use them as the foundation of social conventions.


Concentrations of power


Concentrations of power do not always respect the rights of persons. If one denies this fact one gets: concentrations of power always respect the rights of persons. This does not correspond with our experiences. Concentrations of power characterize our society. Concentrations of power force persons to concentrate on participating in competition and power games, in order to create a social position for themselves. Concurrently with the concentrations of power dominating our conscious mind and being decisive to our situations, the significance of our fellow humans diminishes. And our own significance becomes the significance we have for concentrations of power, the growth of concentrations of power, and the conflicts of concentrations of power.

It is clear that persons should be consciously aware of the rights of persons and therefore must seek to organize the smallest concentrations of power possible.
Examples of concentrations of power which have interests in art include: Mass media (represented by journalists, critics, etc.), capital (represented by collectors, gallery owners, etc.), governments (represented by politicians, civil servants, etc.), and science (represented by historians, theorists, etc.). One can not permit these concentrations of power to have decisive influence and at the same time respect persons, the rights of persons or art.


Politics

The fundamental purpose of politics is to protect the rights of persons. If we deny this assertion we get: the fundamental purpose of politics is not to protect the rights of persons. This suggests that one of the basic tasks of politicians could be, for example, to renounce the rights of themselves and of others. This has no meaning. Or that there is a more important purpose to politics which does not have anything to do with persons and therefore also has nothing to do with the rights of persons. That is plain nonsense. Therefore, we now know that the basic purpose of politics is to protect the rights of persons. In other words we can not talk about politics in a way that makes sense without the assumption that the fundamental purpose of politics is to protect the rights of persons. Concentrations of power do not always respect the rights of persons. If one denies this fact one gets: concentrations of power always respect the rights of persons. This does not correspond with our experiences. It is obvious that if we want to protect the rights of persons we have to organize in as small concentrations of power as possible. Since the fundamental purpose of politics is to protect the rights of persons it is of decisive importance to politics that we seek to organize in as small concentrations of power as possible. It is clear that we can not leave it to others to protect the rights of persons. The notion that it is possible to elect a small number of people to protect the rights of a vast number of people is absurd, because here we are by definition talking about concentration of power, and thus about a concentration of power. And we know that concentrations of power do not always respect the rights of persons. It is clear that if one is conscious of persons and the rights of persons one must be concerned with politics. It is clear that if one is a person and thus concerned with politics and conscious of the rights of persons, it becomes of decisive importance to organize in as small concentrations of power as possible. It becomes of decisive importance to find ways to live and behave which correspond to our knowledge of persons, the rights of persons, etc. It is clear that this is our most important task as our whole existence is threatened.

It is obvious that artists too must be conscious of persons, the rights of persons and the influence of concentrations of power and thus must be concerned with politics. It is obvious that nothing can be more important than to concern oneself with this exactly. That also artists must first and foremost be concerned with creating consciousness about this, and with trying to organize in as small concentrations of power as possible. In this way we have a case where the fundamental ethical norm, and thus ethics, become decisive for aesthetics and politics become decisive to the performance of art. Aesthetics must first and foremost be an examination of, and a science about, possibilities to exist with as small concentrations of power as possible and organize ourselves in a way so that we respect each other's rights. In a way that makes room for persons and that which has significance to them in their daily life.

A Review on Kandinsky's :Concerning the Spiritual In Art

Shared by: gromyko
:icongromyko:

It has been my honor to have come up with this review about the writtings of Wassily Kandinsky, Father of Abstract Art, who never considered himself an "Abstract Artist"...I hope it will give you a better understanding of the True Purpose of art, Art not only of the Physical and Mental/Psychological essence but also of the Highest State which is the Spiritual.

Enjoy reading...

Wassily Kandinsky
Concerning the Spiritual in Art
________________________________________






I. KANDINSKY'S INTRODUCTION  ABOUT GENERAL AESTHETIC

Every work of art is the child of its age and, in many cases, the
mother of our emotions. It follows that each period of culture
produces an art of its own which can never be repeated. Efforts
to revive the art-principles of the past will at best produce an
art that is still-born. It is impossible for us to live and feel,
as did the ancient Greeks. In the same way those who strive to
follow the Greek methods in sculpture achieve only a similarity
of form, the work remaining soulless for all time. Such imitation
is mere aping. Externally the monkey completely resembles a
human being; he will sit holding a book in front of his nose, and
turn over the pages with a thoughtful aspect, but his actions have
for him no real meaning.

There is, however, in art another kind of external similarity
which is founded on a fundamental truth. When there is a
similarity of inner tendency in the whole moral and spiritual
atmosphere, a similarity of ideals, at first closely pursued but
later lost to sight, a similarity in the inner feeling of any one
period to that of another, the logical result will be a revival
of the external forms which served to express those inner
feelings in an earlier age. An example of this today is our
sympathy, our spiritual relationship, with the Primitives. Like
ourselves, these artists sought to express in their work only
internal truths, renouncing in consequence all consideration of
external form.

This all-important spark of inner life today is at present only a
spark. Our minds, which are even now only just awakening after
years of materialism, are infected with the despair of unbelief,
of lack of purpose and ideal. The nightmare of materialism, which
has turned the life of the universe into an evil, useless game,
is not yet past; it holds the awakening soul still in its grip.
Only a feeble light glimmers like a tiny star in a vast gulf of
darkness. This feeble light is but a presentiment, and the soul,
when it sees it, trembles in doubt whether the light is not a
dream, and the gulf of darkness reality. This doubt, and the
still harsh tyranny of the materialistic philosophy, divide our
soul sharply from that of the Primitives. Our soul rings cracked
when we seek to play upon it, as does a costly vase, long buried
in the earth, which is found to have a flaw when it is dug up
once more. For this reason, the Primitive phase, through which we
are now passing, with its temporary similarity of form, can only
be of short duration.

These two possible resemblances between the art forms of today
and those of the past will be at once recognized as diametrically
opposed to one another. The first, being purely external, has no
future. The second, being internal, contains the seed of the
future within itself. After the period of materialist effort,
which held the soul in check until it was shaken off as evil, the
soul is emerging, purged by trials and sufferings. Shapeless
emotions such as fear, joy, grief, etc., which belonged to this
time of effort, will no longer greatly attract the artist. He will
endeavor to awake subtler emotions, as yet unnamed. Living
himself a complicated and comparatively subtle life, his work
will give to those observers capable of feeling them lofty
emotions beyond the reach of words.

The observer of today, however, is seldom capable of feeling
such emotions. He seeks in a work of art a mere imitation of
nature which can serve some definite purpose (for example a
portrait in the ordinary sense) or a presentment of nature
according to a certain convention ("impressionist" painting), or
some inner feeling expressed in terms of natural form (as we
say--a picture with Stimmung) [Footnote: Stimmung is almost
untranslateable. It is almost "sentiment" in the best sense, and
almost "feeling." Many of Corot's twilight landscapes are full of a
beautiful "Stimmung." Kandinsky uses the word later on to mean
the "essential spirit" of nature.--M.T.H.S.] All those varieties of
picture, when they are really art, fulfil their purpose and feed
the spirit. Though this applies to the first case, it applies more
strongly to the third, where the spectator does feel a
corresponding thrill in himself. Such harmony or even contrast of
emotion cannot be superficial or worthless; indeed the Stimmung
of a picture can deepen and purify that of the spectator. Such
works of art at least preserve the soul from coarseness; they
"key it up," so to speak, to a certain height, as a tuning-key
the strings of a musical instrument. But purification, and
extension in duration and size of this sympathy of soul, remain
one-sided, and the possibilities of the influence of art are not
exerted to their utmost.

Imagine a building divided into many rooms. The building may be
large or small. Every wall of every room is covered with pictures
of various sizes; perhaps they number many thousands. They
represent in colour bits of nature--animals in sunlight or
shadow, drinking, standing in water, lying on the grass; near to,
a Crucifixion by a painter who does not believe in Christ;
flowers; human figures sitting, standing, walking; often they are
naked; many naked women, seen foreshortened from behind;
apples and silver dishes; portrait of Councillor So and So; sunset;
lady in red; flying duck; portrait of Lady X; flying geese; lady in
white; calves in shadow flecked with brilliant yellow sunlight;
portrait of Prince Y; lady in green. All this is carefully printed in a
book--name of artist--name of picture. People with these books in
their hands go from wall to wall, turning over pages, reading the
names. Then they go away, neither richer nor poorer than when
they came, and are absorbed at once in their business, which has
nothing to do with art. Why did they come? In each picture is a
whole lifetime imprisoned, a whole lifetime of fears, doubts,
hopes, and joys.

Whither is this lifetime tending? What is the message of the
competent artist? "To send light into the darkness of men's
hearts--such is the duty of the artist," said Schumann. "An
artist is a man who can draw and paint everything," said Tolstoi.

Of these two definitions of the artist's activity we must choose
the second, if we think of the exhibition just described. On one
canvas is a huddle of objects painted with varying degrees of
skill, virtuosity and vigour, harshly or smoothly. To harmonize
the whole is the task of art. With cold eyes and indifferent mind
the spectators regard the work. Connoisseurs admire the "skill"
(as one admires a tightrope walker), enjoy the "quality of
painting" (as one enjoys a pasty). But hungry souls go hungry
away.

The vulgar herd stroll through the rooms and pronounce the
pictures "nice" or "splendid." Those who could speak have said
nothing, those who could hear have heard nothing. This condition
of art is called "art for art's sake." This neglect of inner meanings,
which is the life of colours, this vain squandering of artistic power
is called "art for art's sake."


The artist seeks for material reward for his dexterity, his power
of vision and experience. His purpose becomes the satisfaction
of vanity and greed. In place of the steady co-operation of artists
is a scramble for good things. There are complaints of excessive
competition, of over-production. Hatred, partisanship, cliques,
jealousy, intrigues are the natural consequences of this aimless,
materialist art.

[Footnote: The few solitary exceptions do not destroy the truth
of this sad and ominous picture, and even these exceptions are
chiefly believers in the doctrine of art for art's sake. They
serve, therefore, a higher ideal, but one which is ultimately a
useless waste of their strength. External beauty is one element
of a spiritual atmosphere. But beyond this positive fact (that
what is beautiful is good) it has the weakness of a talent not
used to the full. (The word talent is employed in the biblical
sense.)]

The onlooker turns away from the artist who has higher ideals and
who cannot see his life purpose in an art without aims.

Sympathy is the education of the spectator from the point of view
of the artist. It has been said above that art is the child of
its age. Such an art can only create an artistic feeling which is
already clearly felt. This art, which has no power for the
future, which is only a child of the age and cannot become a
mother of the future, is a barren art. She is transitory and to
all intent dies the moment the atmosphere alters which nourished
her.

The other art, that which is capable of educating further,
springs equally from contemporary feeling, but is at the same
time not only echo and mirror of it, but also has a deep and
powerful prophetic strength.

The spiritual life, to which art belongs and of which she is one
of the mightiest elements, is a complicated but definite and
easily definable movement forwards and upwards. This
movement is the movement of experience. It may take different
forms, but it holds at bottom to the same inner thought and
purpose.

Veiled in obscurity are the causes of this need to move ever
upwards and forwards, by sweat of the brow, through sufferings
and fears. When one stage has been accomplished, and many
evil stones cleared from the road, some unseen and wicked hand
scatters new obstacles in the way, so that the path often seems
blocked and totally obliterated. But there never fails to come to
the rescue some human being, like ourselves in everything except
that he has in him a secret power of vision.

He sees and points the way. The power to do this he would
sometimes fain lay aside, for it is a bitter cross to bear. But
he cannot do so. Scorned and hated, he drags after him over the
stones the heavy chariot of a divided humanity, ever forwards and
upwards.

Often, many years after his body has vanished from the earth, men
try by every means to recreate this body in marble, iron, bronze,
or stone, on an enormous scale. As if there were any intrinsic
value in the bodily existence of such divine martyrs and servants
of humanity, who despised the flesh and lived only for the
spirit! But at least such setting up of marble is a proof that a
great number of men have reached the point where once the
being they would now honour, stood alone.



Wassily Kandinsky



complete source:
www.mnstate.edu/gracyk/courses…

MICHAEL SADLER'S Interpretation

It is no common thing to find an artist who, even if he be willing to try, is capable of expressing his aims and ideals with any clearness and moderation. Some people will say that any such capacity is a flaw in the perfect artist, who should find his expression in line and colour, and leave the multitude to grope its way unaided towards comprehension. This attitude is a relic of the days when  "l'art pour l'art" was the latest battle cry; when eccentricity of manner and irregularity of life were more important than any talent to the would-be artist; when every one except oneself was bourgeois.

The last few years have in some measure removed this absurdity, by destroying the old convention that it was middle-class to be sane, and that between the artist and the outer-world yawned a gulf which few could cross. Modern artists are beginning to realize their social duties. They are the spiritual teachers of the world, and for their teaching to have weight, it must be comprehensible. Any attempt, therefore, to bring artist and public into sympathy, to enable the latter to understand the ideals of the former, should be thoroughly welcome; and such an attempt is this book of Kandinsky's.

The author is one of the leaders of the new art movement in Munich. The group of which he is a member includes painters, poets, musicians, dramatists, critics, all working to the same end--the expression of the SOUL of nature and humanity, or, as Kandinsky terms it, the INNERER KLANG.

Perhaps the fault of this book of theory--or rather the characteristic most likely to give cause for attack--is the tendency to verbosity. Philosophy, especially in the hands of a writer of German, presents inexhaustible opportunities for vague and grandiloquent language. Partly for this reason, partly from incompetence, I have not primarily attempted to deal with the philosophical basis of Kandinsky's art. Some, probably, will find in this aspect of the book its chief interest, but better service will be done to the author's ideas by leaving them to the reader's judgment than by even the most expert criticism.

The power of a book to excite argument is often the best proof of its value, and my own experience has always been that those new ideas are at once most challenging and most stimulating which come direct from their author, with no intermediate discussion.

The task undertaken in this Introduction is a humbler but perhaps a more necessary one. England, throughout her history, has shown scant respect for sudden spasms of theory. Whether in politics, religion, or art, she demands an historical foundation for every belief, and when such a foundation is not forthcoming she may smile indulgently, but serious interest is immediately withdrawn. I am keenly anxious that Kandinsky's art should not suffer this fate. My personal belief in his sincerity and the future of his ideas will go for very little, but if it can be shown that he is a reasonable development of what we regard as serious art, that he is no adventurer striving for a momentary notoriety by the strangeness of his beliefs, then there is a chance that some people at least will give his art fair consideration, and that, of these people, a few will come to love it as, in my opinion, it deserves.

Post-Impressionism, that vague and much-abused term, is now almost a household word. That the name of the movement is better known than the names of its chief leaders is a sad misfortune, largely caused by the over-rapidity of its introduction into England. Within the space of two short years a mass of artists from Manet to the most recent of Cubists were thrust on a public, who had hardly realized Impressionism. The inevitable result has been complete mental chaos. The tradition of which true Post- Impressionism is the modern expression has been kept alive down the ages of European art by scattered and, until lately,  neglected painters. But not since the time of the so-called Byzantines, not since the period of which Giotto and his School were the final splendid blossoming, has the "Symbolist" ideal in art held general sway over the "Naturalist." The Primitive Italians, like their predecessors the Primitive Greeks, and, in turn, their predecessors the Egyptians, sought to express the inner feeling rather than the outer reality.

This ideal tended to be lost to sight in the naturalistic revival of the Renaissance, which derived its inspiration solely from those periods of Greek and Roman art which were pre-occupied with the expression of external reality. Although the all-embracing genius of Michelangelo kept the "Symbolist" tradition alive, it is the work of El Greco that merits the complete title of "Symbolist." From El Greco springs Goya and the Spanish influenceon Daumier and Manet. When it is remembered that, in the meantime, Rembrandt and his contemporaries, notably Brouwer, left their mark on French art in the work of Delacroix, Decamps and Courbet, the way will be seen clearly open to Cezanne and Gauguin.

The phrase "symbolist tradition" is not used to express any conscious affinity between the various generations of artists. As Kandinsky says: "the relationships in art are not necessarily ones of outward form, but are founded on inner sympathy of meaning." Sometimes, perhaps frequently, a similarity of outward form will appear. But in tracing spiritual relationship only inner meaning must be taken into account.

There are, of course, many people who deny that Primitive Art had an inner meaning or, rather, that what is called "archaic expression" was dictated by anything but ignorance of representative methods and defective materials. Such people are numbered among the bitterest opponents of Post-Impressionism, and indeed it is difficult to see how they could be otherwise. "Painting," they say, "which seeks to learn from an age when art was, however sincere, incompetent and uneducated, deliberately rejects the knowledge and skill of centuries." It will be no easy matter to conquer this assumption that Primitive art is merely untrained Naturalism, but until it is conquered there seems little hope for a sympathetic understanding of the symbolist ideal.

The task is all the more difficult because of the analogy drawn by friends of the new movement between the neo-primitive vision and that of a child. That the analogy contains a grain of truth does not make it the less mischievous. Freshness of vision the child has, and freshness of vision is an important element in the new movement. But beyond this a parallel is non-existent, must be non-existent in any art other than pure artificiality. It is one thing to ape ineptitude in technique and another to acquire simplicity of vision. Simplicity--or rather discrimination of vision--is the trademark of the true Post-Impressionist. He OBSERVES and then SELECTS what is essential. The result is a logical and very sophisticated synthesis. Such a synthesis will find expression in simple and even harsh technique. But the process can only come AFTER the naturalist process and not before it. The child has a direct vision, because his mind is unencumbered by association and because his power of concentration is unimpaired by a multiplicity of interests. His method of drawing is immature; its variations from the ordinary result from lack of capacity.  

Two examples will make my meaning clearer. The child draws a landscape. His picture contains one or two objects only from the number before his eyes. These are the objects which strike him as important. So far, good. But there is no relation between them; they stand isolated on his paper, mere lumpish shapes. The Post- Impressionist, however, selects his objects with a view to expressing by their means the whole feeling of the landscape. His choice falls on elements which sum up the whole, not those which first attract immediate attention.

Again, let us take the case of the definitely religious picture.

[Footnote: Religion, in the sense of awe, is present in all true art. But here I use the term in the narrower sense to mean pictures of which the subject is connected with Christian or other worship.]

It is not often that children draw religious scenes. More often battles and pageants attract them. But since the revival of the religious picture is so noticeable a factor in the new movement, since the Byzantines painted almost entirely religious subjects, and finally, since a book of such drawings by a child of twelve has recently been published, I prefer to take them as my example. Daphne Alien's religious drawings have the graceful charm of childhood, but they are mere childish echoes of conventional prettiness. Her talent, when mature, will turn to the charming  rather than to the vigorous. There could be no greater contrast between such drawing and that of--say--Cimabue. Cimabue's Madonnas are not pretty women, but huge, solemn symbols. Their heads droop stiffly; their tenderness is universal. In Gauguin's "Agony in the Garden" the figure of Christ is haggard with pain and grief. These artists have filled their pictures with a bitter experience which no child can possibly possess. I repeat, therefore, that the analogy between Post-Impressionism and child- art is a false analogy, and that for a trained man or woman to paint as a child paints is an impossibility. [Footnote: I am well aware that this statement is at variance with Kandinsky, who has contributed a long article-"Uber die Formfrage"--to Der Blaue Reiter, in which he argues the parallel between Post-Impressionism and child vision, as exemplified in the work of Henri Rousseau. Certainly Rousseau's vision is childlike. He has had no artistic training and pretends to none. But I consider that his art suffers so greatly from his lack of training, that beyond a sentimental interest it has little to recommend it.]

All this does not presume to say that the "symbolist" school of art is necessarily nobler than the "naturalist." I am making no comparison, only a distinction. When the difference in aim is fully realized, the Primitives can no longer be condemned as incompetent, nor the moderns as lunatics, for such a condemnation is made from a wrong point of view. Judgement must be passed, not on the failure to achieve "naturalism" but on the failure to express the inner meaning.

The brief historical survey attempted above ended with the names of Cezanne and Gauguin, and for the purposes of this Introduction, for the purpose, that is to say, of tracing the genealogy of the Cubists and of Kandinsky, these two names may be taken to represent the modern expression of the "symbolist" tradition.

The difference between them is subtle but goes very deep. For both the ultimate and internal significance of what they painted counted for more than the significance which is momentary and external. Cezanne saw in a tree, a heap of apples, a human face, a group of bathing men or women, something more abiding than either photography or impressionist painting could present. He painted the "treeness" of the tree, as a modern critic has admirably expressed it. But in everything he did he showed the architectural mind of the true Frenchman. His landscape studies were based on a profound sense of the structure of rocks and hills, and being structural, his art depends essentially on reality. Though he did not scruple, and rightly, to sacrifice accuracy of form to the inner need, the material of which his art was composed was drawn from the huge stores of actual nature.

Gauguin has greater solemnity and fire than Cezanne. His pictures are tragic or passionate poems. He also sacrifices conventional form to inner expression, but his art tends ever towards the spiritual, towards that profounder emphasis which cannot be expressed in natural objects nor in words. True his abandonment of representative methods did not lead him to an abandonment of natural terms of expression--that is to say human figures, trees and animals do appear in his pictures. But that he was much nearer a complete rejection of representation than was Cezanne is shown by the course followed by their respective disciples.

The generation immediately subsequent to Cezanne, Herbin, Vlaminck, Friesz, Marquet, etc., do little more than exaggerate Cezanne's technique, until there appear the first signs of Cubism. These are seen very clearly in Herbin. Objects begin to be treated in flat planes. A round vase is represented by a series of planes set one into the other, which at a distance blend into a curve. This is the first stage.

The real plunge into Cubism was taken by Picasso, who, nurtured on Cezanne, carried to its perfectly logical conclusion the master's structural treatment of nature. Representation disappears. Starting from a single natural object, Picasso and the Cubists produce lines and project angles till their canvases are covered with intricate and often very beautiful series of balanced lines and curves. They persist, however, in giving them picture titles which recall the natural object from which their minds first took flight.

With Gauguin the case is different. The generation of his disciples which followed him--I put it thus to distinguish them from his actual pupils at Pont Aven, Serusier and the rest-- carried the tendency further. One hesitates to mention Derain, for his beginnings, full of vitality and promise, have given place to a dreary compromise with Cubism, without visible future, and above all without humour. But there is no better example of the development of synthetic symbolism than his first book of woodcuts.

Here is work which keeps the merest semblance of conventional form, which gives its effect by startling masses of black and white, by sudden curves, but more frequently by sudden angles.

[FOOTNOTE: The renaissance of the angle in art is an interesting feature of the new movement. Not since Egyptian times has it been used with such noble effect. There is a painting of Gauguin's at Hagen, of a row of Tahitian women seated on a bench, that consists entirely of a telling design in Egyptian angles. Cubism is the result of this discovery of the angle, blended with the influence of Cezanne.]

In the process of the gradual abandonment of natural form the "angle" school is paralleled by the "curve" school, which also descends wholly from Gauguin. The best known representative is Maurice Denis. But he has become a slave to sentimentality, and has been left behind. Matisse is the most prominent French artist who has followed Gauguin with curves. In Germany a group of young men, who form the Neue Kunstlevereinigung in Munich, work almost entirely in sweeping curves, and have reduced natural objects purely to flowing, decorative units.

But while they have followed Gauguin's lead in abandoning representation both of these two groups of advance are lacking in spiritual meaning. Their aim becomes more and more decorative, with an undercurrent of suggestion of simplified form. Anyone who has studied Gauguin will be aware of the intense spiritual value of his work. The man is a preacher and a psychologist, universal by his very unorthodoxy, fundamental because he goes deeper than civilization. In his disciples this great element is wanting. Kandinsky has supplied the need. He is not only on the track of an art more purely spiritual than was conceived even by Gauguin, but he has achieved the final abandonment of all representative intention. In this way he combines in himself the spiritual and technical tendencies of one great branch of Post-Impressionism.

The question most generally asked about Kandinsky's art is: "What is he trying to do?" It is to be hoped that this book will do something towards answering the question. But it will not do everything. This is partly because it is impossible to put into words the whole of Kandinsky's ideal, partly because in his anxiety to state his case, to court criticism, the author has been tempted to formulate more than is wise. His analysis of colours and their effects on the spectator is not the real basis of his art, because, if it were, one could, with the help of a scientific manual, describe one's emotions before his pictures with perfect accuracy. And this is impossible.

Kandinsky is painting music. That is to say, he has broken down the barrier between music and painting, and has isolated the pure emotion which, for want of a better name, we call the artistic emotion. Anyone who has listened to good music with any enjoyment will admit to an unmistakable but quite indefinable thrill. He will not be able, with sincerity, to say that such a passage gave him such visual impressions, or such a harmony roused in him such emotions. The effect of music is too subtle for words. And the same with this painting of Kandinsky's. Speaking for myself, to stand in front of some of his drawings or pictures gives a keener and more spiritual pleasure than any other kind of painting. But I could not express in the least what gives the pleasure. Presumably the lines and colours have the same effect as harmony and rhythm in music have on the truly musical. That psychology comes in no one can deny. Many people--perhaps at present the very large majority of people--have their colour-music sense dormant. It has never been exercised. In the same way many people are unmusical--either wholly, by nature, or partly, for lack of experience. Even when Kandinsky's idea is universally understood there may be many who are not moved by his melody. For my part, something within me answered to Kandinsky's art the first time I met with it. There was no question of looking for representation; a harmony had been set up, and that was enough.

Of course colour-music is no new idea. That is to say attempts have been made to play compositions in colour, by flashes and harmonies. [Footnote: Cf. "Colour Music," by A. Wallace Rimington. Hutchinson. 6s. net.] Also music has been interpreted in colour. But I do not know of any previous attempt to paint, without any reference to music, compositions which shall have on the spectator an effect wholly divorced from representative association. Kandinsky refers to attempts to paint in colour- counterpoint. But that is a different matter, in that it is the borrowing from one art by another of purely technical methods, without a previous impulse from spiritual sympathy.

One is faced then with the conflicting claims of Picasso and Kandinsky to the position of true leader of non-representative art. Picasso's admirers hail him, just as this Introduction hails Kandinsky, as a visual musician. The methods and ideas of each rival are so different that the title cannot be accorded to both. In his book, Kandinsky states his opinion of Cubism and its fatal weakness, and history goes to support his contention. The origin of Cubism in Cezanne, in a structural art that owes its very existence to matter, makes its claim to pure emotionalism seem untenable. Emotions are not composed of strata and conflicting pressures. Once abandon reality and the geometrical vision becomes abstract mathematics. It seems to me that Picasso shares a Futurist error when he endeavours to harmonize one item of reality--a number, a button, a few capital letters--with a surrounding aura of angular projections. There must be a conflict of impressions, which differ essentially in quality. One trend of modern music is towards realism of sound. Children cry, dogs bark, plates are broken. Picasso approaches the same goal from the opposite direction. It is as though he were trying to work from realism to music. The waste of time is, to my mind, equally complete in both cases. The power of music to give expression without the help of representation is its noblest possession. No painting has ever had such a precious power. Kandinsky is striving to give it that power, and prove what is at least the logical analogy between colour and sound, between line and rhythm of beat. Picasso makes little use of colour, and confines himself only to one series of line effects--those caused by conflicting angles. So his aim is smaller and more limited than Kandinsky's even if it is as reasonable. But because it has not wholly abandoned realism but uses for the painting of feeling a structural vision dependent for its value on the association of reality, because in so doing it tries to make the best of two worlds, there seems little hope for it of redemption in either.

As has been said above, Picasso and Kandinsky make an  interesting parallel, in that they have developed the art respectively  of Cezanne and Gauguin, in a similar direction. On the decision of Picasso's failure or success rests the distinction between Cezanne and Gauguin, the realist and the symbolist, the painter of externals and the painter of religious feeling. Unless a spiritual value is accorded to Cezanne's work, unless he is believed to be a religious painter (and religious painters need not paint Madonnas), unless in fact he is paralleled closely with Gauguin, his follower Picasso cannot claim to stand, with Kandinsky, as a prophet of an art of spiritual harmony.

If Kandinsky ever attains his ideal--for he is the first to admit that he has not yet reached his goal--if he ever succeeds in finding a common language of colour and line which shall stand alone as the language of sound and beat stands alone, without recourse to natural form or representation, he will on all hands be hailed as a great innovator, as a champion of the freedom of art. Until such time, it is the duty of those to whom his work has spoken, to bear their testimony. Otherwise he may be condemned as one who has invented a shorthand of his own, and  who paints pictures which cannot be understood by those who have  not the key of the cipher. In the meantime also it is important that his position should be recognized as a legitimate, almost inevitable outcome of Post-Impressionist tendencies. Such is the recognition this Introduction strives to secure. -- MICHAEL T. H. SADLER


:icongromyko:
Transcendance in Art
Prelude to the Revolution of the Mind and Spirit

Gromyko Semper




According to the perennial philosophy – the common mystical core of the world’s great spiritual traditions – men and women posses at least three different modes of knowing: the eye of the flesh, which discloses the material, concrete, and sensual world; the eye of the mind, which discloses the symbolic, conceptual, and linguistic world; and the eye of contemplation, which discloses the spiritual, transcendental, and transpersonal world.  These are not three different worlds, but three different aspects of our one world, disclosed by different modes of knowing and perceiving.

Moreover, these three modes of knowing, these three “eyes,” are not simply given to a person all at once.  Rather, they unfold in a developmental sequence from the lower to the higher.  In the first two years of a baby’s life, sensory motor intelligence – the eye of flesh – develops and evolves to disclose a material world of “object permanence,” of solid surfaces and colors and objects, as well as the sensory motor body’s own feelings and emerging impulses.  In the following decade or two, the eye of mind will increasingly emerge and develop, disclosing in its turn the world of ideas, symbols, concepts, images, values, meanings, and intentions.  If development continues beyond the mind via meditative disciplines or, in some instances, psychedelically induced mystical experience – then the eye of contemplation opens and discloses the world of soul and spirit, of subtle energies and insights, of radical intuition and transcendental illumination.

The eye of flesh tends to disclose a prepersonal, preverbal, preconceptual world, a world of matter and bodies.  The eye of mind tends to disclose a personal, verbal, and conceptual world, a world of ego and mind.  And the eye of contemplation tends to disclose a transpersonal, transverbal, trans-egoic world, a world of luminous soul and spirit.  The first realm made visible to the eyes of perception is composed of sensibilia, or phenomena that can be perceived by the body.  The second realm is composed of intelligibilia, or objects perceived by the mind.  The third realm consists of transcendelia, or objects perceived by the soul and spirit.  These three overall realms, from matter/body to ego/mind to soul/spirit, are collectively referred to in various contemplative traditions as the Great Chain of Being.

When it comes to a critical theory of art based on the perennial philosophy then, the immediate question is:  What eye, or eyes, is the particular artist using?
Of course, the artist’s medium is usually sensibilia, or various material substances (paint, clay, concrete, metal, wood, etc.)  The critical question, however, is this: Using the medium of sensibilia, is the artist trying to represent, depict, or evoke the realm of sensibilia itself, or the realm of intelligibilia, or the realm of transcendelia?  In other words, to the standard question, “How competent is the artist in depicting or evoking a particular phenomenon?”, we add the crucial ontological question: “Where on the Great Chain of Being is the phenomenon the artist is attempting to depict, evoke, or express?”

We have, then, two important but different scales of critical evaluation for any work of art: 1) How well does it succeed on its own level?  2) How high is that level?

The great achievement of European art in the last thousand years was the convincing depiction of the realm of sensibilia. Not much more than 500 years ago the rules of perspective became widely known and utilized in painting, embodying a discovery and an understanding of the actual geometry of the material-sensible world (as in, for example, Renaissance art.)  Painting became increasingly realistic, or empirical, tied to the concrete sensory world; the eye of flesh and its bodily perspective.

Even religious art tended to be concrete and literal.  Depictions of the Virgin Birth, the Ascension, the parting of the Red Sea-all were portrayed as actual, concrete facts, not as symbolic, figurative, or conceptual.  In other words, even most “religious” art was tied to the realm of concrete sensibilia.

All of that would begin to change with the coming of modern art.  If the first great achievement of European art was to perfect the depiction of sensibilia, the second great achievement was to rise above it and begin to depict the various realms and aspects of intelligibilia, of symbolic and abstract and conceptual and phenomenological art and its rules.  The media would still be sensibilia, but the depicted object no longer would be bound by the rules or perspectives of matter; it would not follow the contours of matter, but of mind.  No longer Nature, but Psyche.  No longer realistic, but abstract.  Not things, but thoughts. Not Euclidean, but Surrealistic.  Not representational, but impressionistic or expressionistic.  Not literal and concrete, but figurative and symbolic.

Starting with Paul Cézanne, whom Matisse called “the master of us all, “ we see the fixed perspectivism of the material-sensible world broken down and superseded by an emotional-psychological participation (intelligibilia), not mere representation (sensibilia.)  With Kandinsky, arguably the father of abstract art, we see the full emergence, if not perfection, of intelligibilia over sensibilia; of the condensed potency of the abstract over the mere imitation of Nature’s forms.  As Kandinsky put it, “It must become possible to hear the whole world as it is without representational interpretation. “  That is seeing not with the eye of flesh, but with the eye of mind.

Cubism began as a type of geometry of natural form, but quickly became a vehicle for essential impressionism, an act of attention not just to outer objects but also to inward mental forms and patterns. “This is the art of painting new structures out of elements borrowed not from the reality of sight, but from the reality of insight, “ as one critic expressed it.

Perhaps no one articulated the need to go from mere Nature to more than Nature better than Piet Mondrian.  “As the natural becomes more and more ‘automatic’, we see life’s interest fixed more and more on the inward.  The life of truly modern man is directed neither toward the material for its own sake nor toward the predominantly emotional [matter/body]:  rather, it takes the form of the autonomous life of the human [psyche] becoming conscious…  Life is becoming more and more abstract.  The truly modern artist consciously perceives the abstractness of the emotion of beauty… In the vital reality of the abstract, the new man has transcended the feelings of nostalgia…. There is not escaping the tragic, so long as our vision of nature is naturalistic [tied to sensibilia].  That is why a deeper vision is essential.”  Deeper than sensibilia is intelligibilia, and deeper still, is transcendelia.  Mondrian and Kandinsky were pioneers in both.

The point was to free the mind from the confines of nature, and thus to free art from photographic realism, while at the same time plumbing the depths of the psyche and giving artistic expression to that extraordinary search.

The art of the mind, of depicting the geometries of thought and the patterns of psyches, the art of intelligibilia clothed in sensibilia, was found in an inward, not solely outward, direction.  It was an act of attention to the inner subject as well as to the outer object, and conveyed the interrelationship between the two.  In it, the patterns of thought interrelated with the patterns of things.  Although these patterns or essences depend in part on looking inwardly with the mind’s eye, they are not merely subjective or idiosyncratic, but rather, to the extent that they resonate truly in a work of art, reflect the larger patterns of reality itself.  As Brancusi almost screamed out: “They are imbeciles who call my work abstract; that
which they call abstract is the most realist, because what is real is not the exterior form but the idea, the essence of things.”  As Hegel and Schelling would put it, “The ideal is real, and the real is ideal.”

By exploring the realm of intelligibilia, modern artists were able to return to the ground of sensibilia with new revelation of color.  Matisse, for example, freed color from the constraints of nature.  As he forceful put it, “The Beaux-Arts masters told their students: ‘Copy nature stupidly.’  Throughout my entire career I have reacted against this attitude…. Color exists in itself, possesses its own beauty…. I understood then that one could work with expressive colors which are not necessarily descriptive colors.”  Color could be expressive of intelligibilia, not just descriptive of sensibilia.

The point, then, was to stay firmly rooted in sensibilia-not to deny nature or repress it; but to reach through or beyond sensibilia to intelligibilia, to the essence of mind, idea, and intention, and to clothe them in the “plastic” of the material or natural realm; and further, through introspection and intuition of the patterns of mind and intelligibilia, to return afresh with new and radical insights into the form and color and essence of sensibilia itself.

We now reach the third and most crucial evolutionary movement: the emergence in art not just of body or of mind, but moreover of spirit, and the correlative depiction in art not just of sensibilia and intelligibilia, but also of transcendelia.

Not that the spiritual hadn’t been portrayed before in art, but in the West its flowering had always been fragile.  Early Christian icons, with their simplified forms floating on golden fields of “light, “ were sacred symbols of the incarnation of the Word. When Christianity adopted the figurative, naturalistic style of secular art, it replaced the symbolic icon with a fundamentalist form of realism that specialized in the literal depiction of spiritual events such as the resurrection.  There is nothing transcendental in fundamentalist “facts” that wish to claim the dubious status of empirical sensibilia.

Contrary to prevailing tendencies of realism in European art, there has been a sporadic Western “tradition” of mystical and visionary painting over the last 900 years.  Early evidence of this visionary symbolist art can be found in the twelfth century in the work of Hildegard of Bingen.  She was a powerful abbess who created a major text explaining the symbols of her visions and had the visions illustrated or illuminated.  These somewhat crude but beautiful works are forms of transcendelia.

Michelangelo, a neo-Platonist, was trying to symbolically express through his art a spiritual ideal clothed in material form.  In addition he said, “…it is not sufficient merely to be a great master in painting and very wise, but I think it is necessary for the painter to be very moral in his mode of life, or even, if such were possible, a saint, so that the Holy Spirit may inspire his intellect.”

Hieronymous Bosch created a unique world of highly symbolic, imaginative vistas of heavens and hells intended to reinforce the spiritual faith of his viewers.  The poet and visionary artist William Blake wrote in the Marriage of Heaven and Hell:

                        If the doors of perception were cleansed every thing
                        Would appear to man, as it is, infinite.
                        For man has closed himself up, till he sees all things through
                        Narrow chinks of his cavern.




To Blake, painting had nothing to do with copying from nature, but was an art of divine imagination:

Shall Painting be confined to the sordid drudgery of fac-simile representations of merely mortal and perishing substances, and not be as poetry and music are, elevated into its own proper sphere of invention and visionary conception? No, it shall not be so!  Painting, as well as poetry and music, exists and exults in immortal thoughts.

The nineteenth-century symbolist painter Delville, wrote that he intended to evoke, “…the great universal life…which rules and moves the universe, beings and things, mortals or immortals, in the infinite rhythm of Eternity.”  And in the twentieth century the painter Pavel Tchelitchew’s works moved through the visionary, symbolic levels of consciousness to mystical abstractions reflecting deep transcendental levels of being and light.

There were also artists throughout the history of European art who depicted images of sensibilia but, like the Zen landscapists, reached a state of contemplative absorption which dissolved the boundary between subject and object and opened a channel to immanent transcendelia.  The pre-renaissance master, Fra Angelico, was a monk and a painter.  His works were intended for the contemplation of other monks and are filled with a devotional intensity which raises them high on the Great Chain of Being.  Rembrandt was good at creating the illusion of space in his painting, but he was great precisely because he also revealed a dimension of the human soul. He revealed character and a living, spiritual presence in all his portraits and the self-portraits in particular.  The spirit in the flesh, this is what we see-not a mound of material sensibilia, but a soul timelessly peering through matter. Van Gogh let the rhythms of the cosmos, a universal energy, resonate through his works.  His landscapes are saturated with spirit.  In the twentieth century, Ivan Albright has conveyed in his magical hyperrealist paintings a sense of the awesome and infinite dimension of the immanent divine.  These artists had powers of concentration, imagination, or mystic reverie that gave them glimpses of divinity and enabled them to create visionary or representational images that evoke a world beyond sensibilia and intelligibilia.  Many of the pioneers in modern abstraction, such as Kandinsky, Mondrian, Malevich, Klee, and Brancusi felt that a new spirituality in art would have to be Spirit approached directly and immediately, not in the mythic forms of the religious mind or with representational imagery, but through direct intuition and contemplative realization.  They felt that they had in fact pushed beyond the individual mind and body and discovered, through their art, a genuine and powerful approach to Spirit itself.  They were disclosing and portraying not just sensibilia, or intelligibilia, but transcendelia.

Art was to be not just the technical skills of observation and execution, or creativity, but a method of spiritual growth and development on the part of the artists.  True art, according to Kandinsky, must involve the cultivation of the soul and spirit: “The artist must train not only his eye but also his soul, so that it can weigh colors in its own scale and thus become a determinant in artistic creation.”

If artist are to “be the servants of Spirit,” he said, then they must grow and develop their own souls to a point at which they are capable of directly intuiting the spiritual dimension. In order to see (let alone artistically convey) Spirit, the eye of contemplation must first be opened, and this opening –Kandinsky’s “revelation of Spirit illumined as if by a flash of lightning” – discloses newer, higher, and wider dimensions of existence.







In the artist’s own spiritual growth and development, ever subtler experiences, emotions, and perceptions would come into view, and it was the artist’s duty to portray these subtler experiences (transcendelia), and thus to evoke them and encourage them in those who witness with care the finished work.

We have said that sensibilia is the realm of the prepersonal, intelligibilia the realm of the personal, and transcendelia the realm of the transpersonal.  That is, the body and nature are preverbal, preconceptual, and therefore pre-egoic and prepersonal.  The mind is verbal, conceptual, and symbolic, and therefore forms the basis of ego and individuality.  But Spirit, being universal, is beyond body and mind-it is transverbal, trans-egoic, transindividual.  It exists at a point where the soul touches eternity and completely transcends the prison of its own involvement.

The more consciousness evolves, the more it grows beyond the narrow bounds of the personal ego, the more it touches the transpersonal and universal Divine.  Thus it is no accident that Mondrian states:  “All art is more or less direct aesthetic expression of the universal.  This more or less implies degrees {of development of evolution}…. A great heightening of subjectivity is taking place in man-in other words a growing, expanding consciousness.  Subjectivity ceases to exist only when the mutation-like leap is made from individual existence to universal existence.”  Thus, he concludes, “The new culture will be that of the mature individual; once matured, the individual will be open to the universal and will tend more and more to unite with it” -a common conclusion of mystics the world over.

According to modern masters such as Malevich, Franz Marc, Paul Klee, Brancusi, and others, true and genuine art, the highest art, involved:  First, the development or growth of the artist’s won soul, right up to the point of union with universal Spirit and transcendence of the separate self or individual ego; and second, the artistic depiction/expression of this spiritual dimension, particularly in such a way as to evoke similar spiritual insights on the part of observers. A genuine search has begun for what Franz Marc called ”symbols that belong on the altars of a future spiritual religion.”

If, as many modernists thought, true art is the manifestation of Spirit, and if Spirit is seen most clearly with the eye of contemplation, and if meditation is one of the surest ways to open the contemplative eye, it follows that the truest and purest art will be contemplative art, art born in fire of spiritual epiphany and fanned by meditative awareness.




This, of course, is precisely the idea behind many of the great Asian works of art, from Tibetan thangkas to Zen landscapes to Hindu iconography.  The best of these works of art stem directly from the meditative mind. The artist/master enters meditative samadhi, or contemplative union, and from the union of the subject and the object, the “subject” then “paints: the object,” although all three-painter, painting, and object-are now one indivisible act. (“He who cannot become an object cannot paint that object”.)  Precisely because the painting is executed in this nondual state of subject/object union or transcendence, it is spiritual in the deepest sense.  It springs from the dimension of nondual and universal Spirit, which transcends (and thus unites) both subject and object, self and other, inner and outer. These art works serve one main purpose: they are supports for contemplation.  By gazing on the artwork, the viewer is invited to enter the same meditative and spiritual state that produced it.



  That is, the viewer is invited to experience nonduality, the union of the subject with all objects and the discovery of universal or transcendental awareness, in an immediate, simple, and direct fashion.  This is the purest reason why one views art in the first place; art created in this nondual awareness offers direct access to nondual Spirit.

The secret of all genuinely spiritual works of art is that they issue from nondual or unity consciousness, no matter what “objects” they portray.  A painting does not have to depict crosses and Buddhas to be spiritual.  This is why, for example, Zen landscapes are so profoundly sacred in their texture, even if they are “just landscapes.”  They issue from a nondual awareness or unity consciousness, which is itself Spirit.  At the height of transcendence, Spirit is also purely immanent and all-pervading, present equally and totally in each and every object, whether of matter, body, mind, or soul.   The artwork, of no matter what the object, becomes transparent to the Divine, and is a direct expression of Spirit.

The viewer momentarily becomes the art and is for that moment released from the alienation that is ego.  Great spiritual art dissolves ego into nondual consciousness, and is to that extent experienced as an epiphany; a revelation, release or liberation from the tyranny of the separate-self sense.  To the extent that a work can usher one into the nondual, then it is spiritual or universal, no matter whether it depicts bugs or Buddhas.

A critical theory of art based on the perennial philosophy would demand at least two scales.  On the horizontal scale would be included all the elements on a given level that influence a work of art. These elements included everything from the artist’s talent and background, socioeconomic facts and psychological factors to cultural influences.  The vertical scale, according to the perennial philosophy, cuts at right angles to all thee earthly facts and deals with the ontological dimension of Being itself.  This vertical scale would have several components summarized by the question, how high up on the Great Chain of Being is the work itself situated?

The great artists of the modern era kept alive the quest for the sacred and the search for Spirit, while all about them the cultural world was succumbing to scientific materialism.  For this we are forever in their debt.  The next great movement in Western Art is waiting to be born.  It will not be of the body, or the mind, but of the soul and spirit.  Thus we await with much anticipation the great artist symbols “that belong on the altars of some future spiritual religion.” *

Excerpt from

IN THE EYE OF THE ARTIST:
Art and the Perennial Philosophy

Ken Wilber



shared by
:icongromyko:
The International Surreal/Fantastic/Visionary/Counter-cultural/Neo-Renaissance Art
Exhibit and Convention
2009

The Surreal Arts :iconthe-surreal-arts:, headed by yours truly :icongromyko:, and Hector Pineda :iconhectorpineda: proudly announces its ambitious dream to date.

We are Inviting practitioners of the Imaginative arts, Surreal/Fantastic/Visionary/Counter-Cultural/Neo-Renaissance artists to read and review the proposed "International International Surreal/Fantastic/Visionary/Counter-cultural/Neo-Renaissance Art Exhibit and Convention2009"...

The aims and purpose,essence and hopes of this ambitious yet plausible show is to redifine the notions of artistic expressions countering the decadent and polluted monopoly of abstraction and the snobbish egoism of academic/impressionist/minimalist/and modernist art...

Take a look at our proposal:


Proposal:

List of Interested Participants (so far):

Gromyko Padilla Semper, Philippines
:icongromyko:
Hector Pineda, Mexico
:iconhectorpineda:
Rheinhard Schimdt, Germany
:iconanubis46:
Mathhias Staber, Austria
:iconmathismondhut:
Peter Zigga, Poland
:iconpeterzigga:
Sandor Badacsonyi, Hungary
:iconsandorbadacsonyi:
Jannelle McKain, USA
:iconjanellemckain:
Ben Tolman, USA
:iconbentolman:
Joe Mc Gown, USA
:iconjoemacgown:
Andrezj Masiani, Poland
:iconmasiani:
Adrian Smith, USA
:iconleothefox:
Ton Harring, Netherlands
:icontonharing:
Tassos Kouris, Greece
:iconanubis:

Suggested Venue:
Basel, Switzerland
(but we are open for considerations, so please contact us)

Sign up your name if you are interested to join us in this noble cause…


o Volunteers are welcome to apply as Organizers
o Please Contact Gromyko or Hector for Details
o Any Proposition that would greatly enhance this Proposal are Welcome


Agenda:


a. To hold a contemporary, and if plausible, traveling, Exhibition wherein committed members in cooperation with selected and voluntary sponsors are tasked to assist the Organizers of this Project with regards to Location, Date and Time, Financial and Public Support, Publications, Advertising, Financial Matters, and Artist Relations before and during the Exhibition.

b. To purposefully focus on expanding public and critical awareness about the Works of the Practitioners of Surreal/Fantastic/Visionary, Counter-cultural, Neo-Renaissance Arts and create an Autonomous Association of Independent Artists free from the Dictatorial Control of the past movement’s Manifestoes, thereby redefining the state of the Arts in Postmodern, Contemporary Society, reuniting them in one common, yet varied goal. The aim over which is Universal Artistic Brotherhood.

c. To provide constant exposure for participating Artists as well as the Plausible Drafting of a New and Revised Declaration of Imaginative Arts, in contrast to the Art History’s past Manifestoes that are Dictatorial in Nature, aiming to redefine the tenets of Avant-garde Surreal/Visionary/Fantastic/Counter-cultural/Neo-Renaissance Movements in contemporary times.

Requisites:


1. Public/Financial Support
a. Private collectors/Institutions willing to support the Project

b. Public funds/charities willing to support the Project

c. Publicity/Advertising from Writers, Advertisers, Newspaper, Magazines, E-zines and On-line Publishing Sites/Agencies Worldwide.

2. Committee and Presiding Officer

a. The Committee of Artists Organizers of this Project shall assist/preside over the Project Duration. They will be responsible for the Projects Internal and External affairs, Agenda, and Resolutions.

b. The Committee shall be composed of Volunteer Artists and Individuals deemed qualified to be a part of this project, who will choose a Presiding Officer to Lead the Project during its Proper. The committee shall also convene before every exhibition travel or proper and shall pass amendments and resolutions every after meeting. The Presiding Officer shall be chosen by Popular vote. Its selection shall be announced in the Club before the Project starts.

c. The Presiding Officer must be of Good standing Professionally and Artistically. The Committee will choose him/her by Popular vote. Only members of the Artist committee are allowed to vote. The Presiding Officer and the committee shall be the Governing body of Independent Individuals who shall shoulder all the Project’s Affairs. They shall be held responsible for every action they make.



3. Participants

a. All qualified Practitioners of Surreal/Fantastic/Visionary Art or Avant-garde Art that suits the thema of this Project are welcome to apply for Inclusion at the Project. Please Contact The Surreal Arts, Hector, Gromyko or any of the Organizers for details.

b. The Number of Works to be exhibited, plus the method of transport, the security of the work, and other matters regarding with the exhibition shall be decided upon by the committee.

c. Participating artists’ works shall be exhibited in selected areas worldwide, henceforth benefiting them by constant exposure. Sales matters shall be decided upon and between the committee and participating artists.


4. The Committee shall decide the Name and Theme/Title of the Exhibition


5. The selection for the artists committee will be decided upon and consulted for consideration by the Surreal Arts Administrators. Chosen artists members shall be informed whether they are chosen to be part of the committee not later than September 31, 2008.


6. The Committee of Artists shall be under the dictates and power of the Surreal Arts club :iconthe-surreal-arts: Administrators who deserve the right to void or approve the resolutions of the committee provided that their reasons are of good standing.


The Declaration of the Imaginative Arts (Proposal):

If you are a true, and passionate practitioner of your Art then you will join us in this noble cause…Together let us show the world the True meaning of Art, let us redefine, remodel, restore the true glory and meaning of ART…Art free from the stagnant pollution Academic discrimination, of bourgeoisie mercantilism, of religious censorship…a new Revolution of the Mind…Let us show them the true meaning of Existence, the meaning of Life, from where we came from, to where we are going, and what are we!

If you are a creator of human expressions, of criticisms, of paradoxes, of visions and dreams, of human suffering and of the Human Psyche, come and join us…Let us show the imperialist crocodilians, the communistic snakes, the mystical capitalist,  and the Religious voyeurs, the true Venom that we collectively share.

If your Imagination is infinite, boundless, periscopical, seeing beyond the normal perspectives of nature, piercing through the constraints and taboo of society, If you are a revolutionary thinker, creator of revolutionary psalms, ardent soldiers of the true meaning of reality, riddle-makers, labyrinth deceivers, metaphysical philosophers, or just a plain seeker of truth, then you belong with us.

We will no longer remain quiet in the comforts of our pseudo-impenetrable Homes. Let us not be contented by mass media brainwashing, of political persuasions, white-washing of the truth, bending of the facts. We are not ignorant…not anymore. Let us say the Truth, let us show it, and Let us expose the lies that civilization has “cursed” us. Let us exorcise the demons of faux-intellectualism. Let us reveal the darkest, innermost secret of cultic religion. Let us peel the mask of political upheavals, the horrors of human suffering, the fiery truth of lust, of greed, of all that is evil. Then let us make them realize that these are the things we need to change…We must show them the evil, the evil they and we must metamorphose into GOOD.

If you are a believer of Hope, of the endless limits of the mind, of the eternal glory of the Imagination, the only tool we must look for in order to balance the dualistic nature of the Universe, the Chaos/Order dichotomy, the Automatism of Life, then you deserve to be with us.

We believe in a utopia of human reasoning free from the constraint and sadomasochistic bondage of pseudo-logic, peering through the convulsive web of metanarratives, of taboos lay upon mankind through generations of psychological conditioning. The Utopia we are seeking exile with when we are exhausted by our waking life’s compulsive materialistic existence, the haven we are hoping to find when tormented by the requisites of capitalistic gain, the greediness of society, the faux religious requirements imposed upon us.  It is in this Utopia that we call Imagination that we must go in order to seek answer to the sphinx that have riddled and ridiculed us long before we existed. It is through the Imagination that we are able to recall the true nature of human psyche free from any condemnations of Waking Life. Imagination is the tool for revolution and change…
If you rely on your Imagination as a beacon of hope for this decadent generation, and if you believe that the aesthetics of the Imagination must be redefined, then join us and together let us change the world not by war, nor by petty dictatorial control and political manipulation, but by showing the Dualistic Nature of the Universe and the Human Psyche, via the Arts, with hopes that it will contribute to the betterment of humanity  and the spread of ideals for the betterment thereof.

:icongromyko:
Gromyko Semper
Imaginative Artist




AMENDMENTS TO THIS PROPOSAL ARE WELCOME!!!

Contact :icongromyko: :iconhectorpineda: :iconthe-surreal-arts: for more info/suggestions/registration...

Let the Realm of the Imagination come to Life!!!
AUTOMATISM

Ethnosphere by gromyko   Ethnosphere by gromyko   Ethnosphere by gromyko  

An automatic drawing is the absolute antithesis of illustration, since one does not see what one is drawing until it has been drawn. It requires a practiced pen-hand and an ability to attain at will an essentially vacuous state of mind, that can be sustained for the duration of the drawing. Those who have read Austin Osman Spare will realise there is much in common between automatic drawing and sigil creation, which is why a true automatic drawing can be talismanic (Spare and Carter wrote an essay entitled Automatic drawing, and Spare's 'Book of Pleasure' expands on what he meant by 'obsessions'). Attaining vacuity seems difficult, until it is realised it is easy, again through long practice. It is the same with wuwei, it takes a long time to learn to do nothing properly. As in martial arts, it is acting from the centre.

While a piece of scribble could be called an automatic drawing, even with scribble there is ability and lack of it. Running grass-script Chinese calligraphy, for instance, has the appearance of scribble, but done by a master it has vibrancy, it has bokki. A single pen line can have that energy, but a single pen line by itself is not an automatic drawing. The line has not been 'taken for a walk', as Paul Klee put it. If you are successful you are unlikely to be drawing trees and cars and houses (at least not in any expected sense) but rather giving form to things more deeply unconscious, things that suggest but defy recognition, that are more things than one, and may even be drawn upside down, but only from one momentary fixed standpoint upon the material. The difficulty in getting a fix on what the automatic drawing actually is is what ultimately fascinates. There is an interaction with the mind that is not broken by the release of identification, since it comes from somewhere quite unreachable, and in our attempt to reach toward it it takes us off balance just slightly. Such, at least, is what I look for in an automatic drawing.


Historical Overview

Automatism is a term appropriated by the Surrealists from physiology and psychiatry and later applied to techniques of spontaneous writing, drawing and painting. In physiology, automatism denotes automatic actions and involuntary processes that are not under conscious control, such as breathing; the term also refers to the performance of an act without conscious thought, a reflex. Psychological automatism is the result of a dissociation between behaviour and consciousness. Familiarity and long usage allow actions to become automatic so that they are performed with a minimum of thought and deliberation. Pathological automatism, also the consequence of dissociative states, ensues from psychological conflict, drugs or trance states; automatism may also be manifested in sensory hallucinations.

During the late 19th century Pierre Janet, a French psychiatrist, treated mental disorders with hypnosis, as did other practitioners of dynamic psychiatry. In particular, he studied the automatic behaviour of mediums to determine the degree to which the subconscious interacts with the conscious during a trance. A medium, while in a self-induced trance, performs spontaneous physical acts with no conscious control. Psychiatry suggests that their apparent messages from a spirit world may actually be subliminal thoughts or feelings, released and given free expression.

While psychiatry considers automatism reflexive and constricting, the Surrealists believed it was a higher form of behaviour. For them, automatism could express the creative force of what they believed was the unconscious in art. Automatism was the cornerstone of Surrealism. André Breton defined Surrealism in his Manifeste du surréalisme (1924) as ‘ psychic automatism in its pure state ’. This automatism was ‘ dictated by thought, in the absence of any control exercised by reason, exempt from any aesthetic or moral concern ’. Breton’s formulation of automatism borrowed ideas from the practices of mediums and from dynamic psychiatry, which emphasized the interplay among conscious and unconscious forces in directing behaviour. Although related to Freud’s free association, the automatism of the Surrealists required only one person and was written rather than spoken. Automatic writing served as the Surrealists’ first technique for tapping what they believed to be the unconscious; subsequently, hypnotic trances and dream narration provided other routes to the unknown.

Automatism in the visual arts can arise from manual techniques that involve chance in the creation of the work ( frottage, grattage, decalcomania) or from psychological experiences (hallucination, intoxication, hypnotic trance, dream narration). André Masson’s automatic drawings, such as Furious Suns (1925; New York, MOMAstartend), Joan Miró’s paintings from the mid-1920s and Max Ernst’s frottages are examples.

By the mid-1940s the American painters known as the Abstract Expressionists (in particular ‘Action Painters’; see Action Painting) had adopted automatic methods in their work. Influenced by Surrealism, these artists introduced the appearance of automatism even when their pictures were deeply deliberated. They included Arshile Gorky, Jackson Pollock, Franz Kline and Willem de Kooning. Between 1946 and 1951 les Automatistes, a group of Canadian Surrealist painters, painted in a technique based on automatic writing. In post-war Europe, the artists grouped under the label Tachism produced paintings with swiftly registered, calligraphic signs and broad brushstrokes, which had the spontaneity associated with automatism.

Jennifer Gibson
From Grove Art Online
© 2007 Oxford University Press


Automatism: Dissected

Automatism has taken on many forms: the automatic writing and drawing initially (and still to this day) practiced by surrealists can be compared to similar, or perhaps parallel phenomena, such as the non-idiomatic improvisation of free jazz.
Surrealist automatism is different from mediumistic automatism, from which the term was inspired. Ghosts, spirits or the like are not purported to be the source of surrealist automatic messages.


ORIGIN

Pure psychic automatism" was how André Breton defined surrealism, and while the definition has proved capable of significant expansion, automatism remains of prime importance in the movement.
In 1919 Breton and Philippe Soupault wrote the first automatic book, Les Champs Magnétiques, while The Automatic Message (1933) was one of Breton's significant theoretical works about automatism.

SURAUTOMATISM

Some Romanian surrealists invented a number of surrealist techniques (such as cubomania, entoptic graphomania, and the movement of liquid down a vertical surface) that purported to take automatism to an absurd point, and the name given, "surautomatism", implies that the methods "go beyond" automatism, but this position is controversial.

Automatic drawing (distinguished from drawn expression of mediums) was developed by the surrealists, as a means of expressing the subconscious. In automatic drawing, the hand is allowed to move 'randomly' across the paper. In applying chance and accident to mark-making, drawing is to a large extent freed of rational control. Hence the drawing produced may be attributed in part to the subconscious and may reveal something of the psyche, which would otherwise be repressed. Examples of automatic drawing were produced by mediums and practitioners of the psychic arts. It was thought by some Spiritualists to be a spirit control that was producing the drawing whilst physically taking control of the medium's body.


Automatic drawing was pioneered by André Masson. Artists who practised automatic drawing include Joan Miró, Salvador Dalí, Jean Arp and André Breton. The technique was transferred to painting (as seen in Miró's paintings which often started out as automatic drawings), and has been adapted to other media; there have even been automatic "drawings" in computer graphics. Pablo Picasso was also thought to have expressed a type of automatic drawing in his later work, and particularly in his etchings and lithographic suites of the 1960s.

Most of the surrealists' automatic drawings were illusionistic, or more precisely, they developed into such drawings when representational forms seemed to suggest themselves. In the 1940s and 1950s the French-Canadian group called Les Automatistes pursued creative work (chiefly painting) based on surrealist principles. They abandoned any trace of representation in their use of automatic drawing. This is perhaps a more pure form of automatic drawing since it can be almost entirely involuntary - to develop a representational form requires the conscious mind to take over the process of drawing, unless it is entirely accidental and thus incidental. These artists, led by Paul-Emile Borduas, sought to proclaim an entity of universal values and ethics proclaimed in their manifesto Refus Global.

As alluded to above, surrealist artists often found that their use of 'automatic drawing' was not entirely automatic, rather it involved some form of conscious intervention to make the image or painting visually acceptable or comprehensible, "...Masson admitted that his 'automatic' imagery involved a two-fold process of unconscious and conscious activity..


How to do an automatic drawing

The key is to make a conscious decision not to control the drawing. Take a blank sheet of paper, pick up the pencil, and just watch the marks your hand and pencil make. You're the observer, not the controller.

If thoughts come to mind as you watch, notice them but let them pass through. Don't dwell on any of them. If necessary just repeat something to yourself like "Whatever comes out is fine."
Keep drawing till you have a sense of completion. Then set that drawing aside and pick up another blank sheet of paper. Start again. Let the pencil move freely.


How many automatic drawings to do?

I usually do a minimum of twenty or ten in a row. Often this is enough to get some sense of completion. Sometimes it takes several drawings for me to let loose enough to allow the drawing to get chaotic and messy. When I allow this "lack of harmony" then I can clear out the inner "mess" and go on.

The later drawings in that session usually have a grace and harmony that I enjoy. But they won't come unless I allow the "chaotic mess" drawings to emerge when they want to. I think of this as a kind of natural "clearing out" process.

The wonderful thing is that it's so natural and easy. There's no effort or strain involved. You don't have to do anything special. It's as if the self has a natural self-cleaning, self-maintaining process built in. The automatic drawing "turns on" this process.
I've done as many as 30 or 40 drawings in a row, too, if I felt like it. It can be exhilarating to do a big stack like this. It's very freeing.

What if it's just scribbling?

Well, that's good. That's how it needs to start. Just let go.
Often you'll look back at some of your first automatic drawings and think "how contrived!" You thought you were really letting go and scribbling wildly, when really you were controlling the pencil. At first, the part of you that Tim Gallwey calls "Self One" just won't believe that you can even "scribble" without its firm controlling guidance.

Empathic responses

For maximum progress in artistic development, put up each drawing separately. A gray background is helpful, but any background that lets you see the drawing well is fine. Then relax and let the drawing enter your awareness. Make it your goal to accept the drawing exactly as it is. You want to feel the world as the drawing feels it.
You may want to make some notes about what you notice. Or just make the empathic responses and let them go. What's important about this is that you're becoming one with the work, in a completely nonjudgmental way. Oddly enough, this gives you a sense of detachment.


-GPS 2008

gromykosemper.blogspot.com
:icongromyko:
gromyko
As a surreal practitioner of this era, it is very helpful if one is to study The Second Surrealist Manifesto by Andre Berton. The following is an excerpt i have devised, with the aim of hopefully enlightening others, especially my fellow surrealists friends and practitioners of the surreal art craft. I hope the community would benifit by this short article...

Happy Reading...


The Second Surrealist Manifesto:
The Declaration of January 27, 1925



With regard to a false interpretation of our enterprise, stupidly circulated among the public, We declare as follows to the entire braying literary, dramatic, philosophical, exegetical and even theological body of contemporary criticism:

We have nothing to do with literature; But we are quite capable, when necessary, of making use of it like anyone else,
Surrealism is not a new means or expression, or an easier one, nor even a metaphysic of poetry. It is a means of total liberation of the mind and of all that resembles it.
We are determined to make a Revolution.
We have joined the word surrealism to the word revolution solely to show the disinterested, detached, and even entirely desperate character of this revolution.
We make no claim to change the mores of mankind, but we intend to show the fragility of thought, and on what shifting foundations, what caverns we have built our trembling houses.
We hurl this formal warning to Society; Beware of your deviations and faux-pas, we shall not miss a single one.
At each turn of its thought, Society will find us waiting.
We are specialists in Revolt. There is no means of action which we are not capable, when necessary, of employing.
We say in particular to the Western world: surrealism exists. And what is this new ism that is fastened to us? Surrealism is not a poetic form. It is a cry of the mind turning back on itself, and it is determined to break apart its fetters, even if it must be by material hammers!
Bureaus de Recherches Surréalistes,
15, Rue de Grenelle

Signed: Louis Aragon, Antonin Artaud, Jacques Baron, Joë Bousquet, J.-A. Boiffard, André Breton, Jean Carrive, René Crevel, Robert Desnos, Paul Élaurd, Max Ernst, et al.

Source: Maurice Nadeau, The History of Surrealism, Cambridge: Belknap Press, 1989, pp.240-41.









Surrealist Manifesto 1929
(excerpt)

Breton's 1929 Surrealist Manifesto states three central conditions:

1.      Whether we like it or not, there is enough there to satisfy several demands of the mind. All these images seem to attest to the fact that the mind is ripe for something more than the benign joys it allows itself in general. This is the only way it has of turning to its own advantage the ideal quantity of events with which it is entrusted. These images show it the extent of its ordinary dissipation and the drawbacks that it offers for it. In the final analysis , it is not such a bad thing for these images to upset the mind, for to upset the mind is to put it in the wrong. . . . But the mind which relishes them draws therefrom the conviction that it is on the right track; on its own, the mind is incapable of finding itself guilty of cavil; it has nothing to fear, since, moreover, it attempts to embrace everything.

2.      The mind which plunges into Surrealism relives with glowing excitement the best part of its childhood. For such a mind, it is similar to the certainty with which a person who is drowning reviews once more, in the space of less than a second, all the insurmountable moments of his life. . . . From childhood memories, and from a few others, there emanates a sentiment of being unintegrated, and then later of having gone astray, which I hold to be the most fertile that exists. It is perhaps childhood that comes closest to one's "real life". . . .

3.      I do not believe in the establishment of a conventional Surrealist pattern any time in the near future . . . Everything is valid when it comes to obtaining the desired suddenness from certain associations.

By: :icongromyko:
Style The Elusive Essential

By: Gromyko Padilla Semper



Of all the elements which go to make Art- form, content, function, Style-the most elusive and indefininable is style. Form has to do with the way things are put together, wheter colors or sounds or words. Content has to do with subject matter, meaning, expression. Function refers to the use for which a work of art is intended, and is basic to architechture and ceramics, but not an essential element in music, painting, or sculpture. All good Art has Style, also. But what is it?

Style maybe thought of as that distinctive quality of a work of art which relates it to others at the same time distinguishes it from others. It is through its style that a work of art can be classified as to time, place,creator. Style is what enebles the cultivated man to look at such a picture as "the Persistence of Memory", and identify it as spanish, not Italian; as From the Catalonian regions not Madrid; as early 20th Century,not earlier and go on to reject De chirico and Ernst and place it as a Dali. Glowing golden portraits against a dark backgroud will imediately suggest Rembrandt; Melancholic spaces with mannequins as De Chirico, Sunflowers, thick paint, expressive colors as Van gogh; and so on.

Style seems to grow out of traits that are both individual and universal, personal and national, timeless and yet of a period. It is helpful in analysing the factors that give style to any work of art to determine which are external and which are internal. Psychologists use the terms heredity and environment. We may use the terms Nature-Nurture, nature referring to those factors which come from within the Artist,  the need for self-expression, the urge to create in a certain material or in  a certain way- his talent, temperament, personality. Those which surround him and help to mold him from the outside, nurture, are his forefathers, his teachers, the place and time in which he grows up and works. available materials, tools and skills are also important external factors. In Ancient Greece wood was scarce, but marble was abundant, hence stone sculpture and architechture developed. In the Philippines, fine hardwood is plentiful and thus led to the development of wood carving. Time is as important a factor as place. For instance, a person of artistic talent born in the hinterland of Germany in the 5th Century would have had little or no examples to study or teachers to instruct him. his art might have been crude or coarse. A thousand years later, however, a man born in the same place would have had the benifit of skilled teachers and fine examples to help him. Such a man was Albretch Durer, whose father taught him the goldsmith's craft and sent him to a good drawing teacher in his hometown. Later Durer benifited by the Art which he observed in both Italy and Holland and returned to Germany to become the greatest German Artist of all time.

Perhaps the most distinctive aspect of style is the Artists personal way of looking at things. Every great work of art is a commentary on life-not just a statement of fact, but an interpretation. In early stages, an artist copies other art, and hence sees the world as other artists saw it before him. But as he develops, his own personality determines his viewpoints and he sees things differently from any other artists. An artist's own nature will also determine wether he is more interested in the materials he uses, or in the technique of shaping them; in the beauty of the form which he is creating, or in communicating message through that form.

There is a second approach to style in art. All art have both form and content, some emphasizing one, some the other; and the element of style is often the result of just this difference in emphasis. For this we may use the term matter-manner, the what and the how of art. One of the ways of classifying Art is according to wether form or content recieves more emphasis: when form seems more important, the work is called classical: when the content dominates, it is called romantic. the terms apply to movements and periods in art history, but can also refer to some individual artist and even individual works of an artist.

The greeks have devised a way to differentiate Art and represented a God for each aspect of Art. Being aware of the dualistic nature of Art, and understanding the form-content empahsis, they named it after Apollo and Dionysus. Apollo was the god of formal beauty, and the term apollonia has come to stand for classical art with traditional form, handed down from the past, controlled and balanced and expressing only restrained emotions of the calmer sort such as joy, contentment, delight. Dionysus was the god of revelry, and dionysian is an adjective covering the romantic qualities of abandonement of restraint, giving way to free emotional expression of love, hate, frenzy, ecstasy, strife, fear, wantoness, drunkenness,et.al. The art of the 17th and 18th centuries was Apollonian, while that of the 19th and 20th, as well as that of the recent century which strove to break away from the old formalism and give free expression to romantic content, seems Dionysian by Contrast.

Below is the classification of Art based on Time-Period:

I have Classified Style in three divisions or epoch: Early Period(Primitive, Archaic), Middle Period(Classical), and Late Period(Decadent)

Early Period Art

Primitive or Archaic art is Bold and Daring, Experimental and Strong by concept. it is Original. It has something to do with the Symbolic,the Sacred. It is Idealistic in Nature.
It is simple, general, geometric, rough(raw), and in an upright form.
It is a mental image.
Early period artists have respect for their craft and use of materials.

Middle Period Art

Classical Art is confident, experienced , and calm. It is ideal, universal and serves to seek the perfect(perfectionistic). It combines originality with tradition. It is natural, detailed, refined, and has a balanced form. It is a Visual Image and is illusionistic in nature. They strive for the mastery of craft, and honest use of material.

Late Period Art

Decadent(Modern or Late) art is characterized by a languid or restless and habit bound mannerism. It is traditional or eclectic but seldom original. It is specific, unique, bizarre, strange, grotesque,ugly. They are complex, elaborate, realistic, delicate and is mostly in an oblique form. They go for the distorted, fragmented or multiple image. Late artists are virtuoso craftmen, exhibitionists,egotists, they deny and conceal the material for illusionistic means and is psychologically striking at the meaning of truth and life.
“TRADITIONAL SURREALIST ART AND TECHNIQUES”

An comprehensive study of the Methods and Techniques employed by the Surrealist Artists.

By::icongromyko:

-2008-


Surrealism in art, poetry, and literature utilizes numerous unique techniques and games to provide inspiration. Many of these are said to free imagination by producing a creative process free of conscious control. The importance of the unconscious as a source of inspiration is central to the nature of surrealism.


The Surrealist movement has been a fractious one since its inception. The value and role of the various techniques has been one of many subjects of disagreement. Some Surrealists consider automatism and games to be sources of inspiration only, while others consider them as starting points for finished works. Others consider the items created through automatism to be finished works themselves, needing no further refinement.


SURREALISTIC TECHNIQUES:

• 1 Aerography
• 2 Automatism
• 3 Bulletism
• 4 Calligramme
• 5 Collage
• 6 Coulage
• 7 Cubomania
• 8 Cut-up technique
• 9 Decalcomania
• 10 Dream résumé
• 11 Echo poem
• 12 Eclaboussure
• 13 Entoptic graphomania
• 14 Étrécissements
• 15 Exquisite corpse
• 16 Frottage
• 17 Fumage
• 18 Games
• 19 Grattage
• 20 Heatage
• 21 Indecipherable writing
• 22 Involuntary sculpture
• 23 Latent news
• 24 Mimeogram
• 25 Movement of liquid down a vertical surface
• 26 Outagraphy
• 27 Paranoiac-critical method
• 28 Parsemage
• 29 Photomontage
• 30 Soufflage
• 31 Surautomatism
• 32 Triptography

Automatism is a surrealist technique involving spontaneous writing, drawing, or the like practiced without conscious aesthetic or moral self-censorship. Automatism has taken on many forms: the automatic writing and drawing initially (and still to this day) practiced by surrealists can be compared to similar, or perhaps parallel phenomena, such as the non-idiomatic improvisation of free jazz  

Surrealist automatism is different from mediumistic automatism, from which the term was inspired. Ghosts, spirits or the like are not purported to be the source of surrealist automatic messages.

Automatic drawing (distinguished from drawn expression of mediums) was developed by the surrealists, as a means of expressing the subconscious. In automatic drawing, the hand is allowed to move 'randomly' across the paper. In applying chance and accident to mark-making, drawing is to a large extent freed of rational control.
Hence the drawing produced may be attributed in part to the subconscious and may reveal something of the psyche, which would otherwise be repressed. Examples of automatic drawing were produced by mediums and practitioners of the psychic arts. It was thought by some Spiritualists to be a spirit control that was producing the drawing whilst physically taking control of the medium's body.

Automatic drawing was pioneered by André Masson. Artists who practised automatic drawing include Joan Miró, Salvador Dalí, Jean Arp and André Breton. The technique was transferred to painting (as seen in Miró's paintings which often started out as automatic drawings), and has been adapted to other media; there have even been automatic "drawings" in computer graphics. Pablo Picasso was also thought to have expressed a type of automatic drawing in his later work, and particularly in his etchings and lithographic suites of the 1960s.

Most of the surrealists' automatic drawings were illusionistic, or more precisely, they developed into such drawings when representational forms seemed to suggest themselves. In the 1940s and 1950s the French-Canadian group called Les Automatistes pursued creative work (chiefly painting) based on surrealist principles. They abandoned any trace of representation in their use of automatic drawing. This is perhaps a more pure form of automatic drawing since it can be almost entirely involuntary - to develop a representational form requires the conscious mind to take over the process of drawing, unless it is entirely accidental and thus incidental. These artists, led by Paul-Emile Borduas, sought to proclaim an entity of universal values and ethics proclaimed in their manifesto Refus Global.

As alluded to above, surrealist artits often found that their use of 'automatic drawing' was not entirely automatic, rather it involved some form of conscious intervention to make the image or painting visually acceptable or comprehensible, "...Masson admitted that his 'automatic' imagery involved a two-fold process of unconscious and conscious acitvity....”

Bulletism is shooting ink at a blank piece of paper. The artist can then develop images based on what is seen.

A calligramme is a text or poem of a type developed by Guillaume Apollinaire in which the words or letters make up a shape, particularly a shape connected to the subject of the text or poem.

Collage is the assemblage of different forms creating a new whole. For example, an artistic collage work may include newspaper clippings, ribbons, bits of colored or hand-made papers, photographs, etc., glued to a solid support or canvas.

A coulage is a kind of automatic or involuntary sculpture made by pouring a molten material (such as metal, wax, chocolate or white chocolate) into cold water. As the material cools it takes on what appears to be a random (or aleatoric) form, though the physical properties of the materials involved may lead to a conglomeration of discs or spheres. The artist may utilize a variety of techniques to affect the outcome.

This technique is also used in the divination process known as ceromancy.


Cubomania is a method of making collages in which a picture or image is cut into squares and the squares are then reassembled without regard for the image. The technique was first used by the Romanian surrealist Gherasim Luca.

Cut-up technique is a literary form or method in which a text is cut up at random and rearranged to create a new text.


Decalcomania, from the French décalcomanie, is a decorative technique by which engravings and prints may be transferred to pottery or other materials. It was invented in England about 1750 and imported into the United States at least as early as 1865. Its invention has been attributed to Simon François Ravenet, an engraver from France who later moved to England and perfected the process he called "decalquer" (which means to copy by tracing). It is pronounced DEE-CALK. The first known use of the French term décalcomanie, in Mary Elizabeth Braddon's Eleanor's Victory (1863), was soon followed by the English decalcomania in an 1865 trade show catalog (The Tenth Exhibition of the Massachusetts Charitable Mechanics' Association); it was popularized during the ceramic transfer craze of the mid-1870s. You can even hear how it was derived - "dee calk 0 mania / decalc o mania". Today the shortened version is "Decal".

The surrealist Oscar Domínguez (referring to his work as "decalcomania with no preconceived object") took up the technique in 1936, using gouache spread thinly on a sheet of paper or other surface (glass has been used), which is then pressed onto another surface such as a canvas. Black gouache was originally used in Dominguez's practice, though colours later made their appearance.
Max Ernst also practiced decalcomania, as did Hans Bellmer and Remedios Varo.

Richard Genovese originated the practice of photographic decalcomania, in which photographic scans are superimposed on decalcomanias. His images are decalcomanias produced in a rapid succession without forethought, the most 'beautiful' ones, the ones that suggest something more or other than a decalcomania are set aside. Then a series of photographic images are superimposed upon scans of the decalcomanias and bits and pieces suggest themselves into the framework of the 'paint blots'. Anything that seems forced is immediately rejected. The process is similar to gazing at cloud formations and visualizing objects within the wispy fog. The photographic images "magically" induce themselves to the decalcomanias and vice versa. It is all rather by chance encounter and the exercise is a sort of re-suggestion of through more traditional decalcomania.

In the 1950s and early '60s, King Features Syndicate marketed a set of decalcomanias bearing full-color pictures of characters from King Features comic strips, including Flash Gordon, the Katzenjammer Kids and Dagwood Bumstead. Intended for young children who might have difficulty pronouncing or reading the word "decalcomanias", these transfers were marketed as "Cockamamies", a deliberate mispronunciation of that word. The term "cockamamie" has entered the language with various slang meanings, usually denoting something that is wacky, strange or unusual.

The production of decalcomanias has not been confined to art. At Yale University fingerpaint decalcomanias have been analysed for their tendency, when the process is repeated several times on the same paper, to generate fractals.

A variation of this procedure in which paint is applied to a paper, the paper then being folded, is popularly practiced (though without surrealist intent) by young schoolchildren.
The dream résumé takes the form of an employment résumé but chronicles its subject's achievements, employment, or the like, in dreams, rather than in waking life. Sometimes dream résumés contain the achievements of both, however.


An echo poem is a poem written using a technique invented by Aurélien Dauguet in 1972. The poem is composed by one or more persons, working together in a process as follows.

The first "stanza" of the poem is written on the left-hand column of a piece of paper divided into two columns. Then the "opposite" of the first stanza, opposite in whatever sense is appropriate to the poem, is composed in the right-hand column of the page. The writing is done automatically and often the "opposite" stanza is composed of a sound correspondence to the first stanza.
For a longer work, the third stanza can then begin in the left-hand column as an "opposite" or a sound correspondence to what preceded it in the right-hand column. Then the fourth stanza might be an "opposite" or sound correspondence to what preceded it in the left-hand column, and so forth. When the poem is completed, the opposite of the last phrase, line, or sentence, generally serves as the title.
This is unrelated to the non-Surrealist echo verse form which appears as a dialogue between the questions of a character and the answers of the nymph Echo.

Eclaboussure  a process in Surrealist painting where Oil paint or Watercolour is laid down and water or turpentine is splattered then soaked up to reveal random splatters or dots where the media was removed, this technique gives the appearance of space and atmosphere. Used in paintings by Remedios Varo.


Entoptic graphomania (sometimes, though inaccurately, called "entopic graphomania") is a surrealist and automatic method of drawing in which dots are made at the sites of impurities in a blank sheet of paper, and lines are then made between the dots. It is apparently to be distinguished from other "entoptic" methods of drawing or art-making.
The method was invented by Dolfi Trost, who as the subtitle of his 1945 book ("Vision dans le cristal. Oniromancie obsessionelle. Et neuf graphomanies entoptiques") suggests, included nine examples therein. This method of "indecipherable writing" (see below) was supposedly an example of "surautomatism," the controversial theory put forward by Trost and Gherashim Luca in which surrealist methods would be practiced that "went beyond" automatism. In Dialectique de Dialectique they had proposed the further radicalization of surrealist automatism by abandoning images produced by artistic techniques in favour of those "resulting from rigorously applied scientific procedures," allegedly cutting the notion of "artist" out of the process of creating images and replacing it with chance and scientific rigour. However, the question has arisen whether an algorithm should be used to determine in what order to connect the dots to maintain the "automatic" nature of the method.

The method has been compared to the "voronoi mathematical progression."
Collage is perceived as an additive method of visual poetry whereas Étrécissements are a reductive method. This was first employed by Marcel Mariën in the 1950s. The results are achieved by the cutting away of parts of images to encourage a new image, by means of a pair of scissors or any other manipulative sharpened instrument.
Exquisite corpse (also known as "exquisite cadaver" or "rotating corpse") is a method by which a collection of words or images are collectively assembled, the result being known as the exquisite corpse or cadavre exquis in French. Each collaborator adds to a composition in sequence, either by following a rule (e.g. "The adjective noun adverb verb the adjective noun") or by being allowed to see the end of what the previous person contributed.


In art, frottage (from French frotter, "to rub") is a surrealist and "automatic" method of creative production developed by Max Ernst.
In frottage the artist takes a pencil or other drawing tool and makes a "rubbing" over a textured surface. The drawing can be left as is or used as the basis for further refinement. While superficially similar to brass rubbing and other forms of rubbing intended to reproduce an existing subject, and in fact sometimes being used as an alternate term for rubbing, frottage differs in being aleatoric or improvisational and random in nature.

It was developed by Ernst in drawings made from 1925. Ernst was inspired by an ancient wooden floor where the grain of the planks had been accentuated by many years of scrubbing. The patterns of the graining suggested strange images to him. He captured these by laying sheets of paper on the floor and then rubbing over them with a soft pencil.

The use of frottage in Surrealism and Surealist art is quite adequate seeing as the rubbing also assumed the role of "rubbing" in its sexual context. This is especially relevant to surrealism seeing as much of the content behind the art works were based on that of sexuality though of course other themes include politics, war, non-conformism and one which made up much of the surrealist art works, dreams and automatic thought though in many cases, especially in works or artists such as De Chirico and Dali, some or all of these themes was used in any work of art. Frottage has also been used in mail art.


Fumage is a surrealist technique invented by Wolfgang Paalen in which impressions are made by the smoke of a candle or kerosene lamp on a piece of paper or canvas.
It was later employed by Salvador Dalí, who called it "sfumato."
Both Paalen and Dali used the technique as a basis for their oil paintings. Paalen's elongated surreal landscapes and Dali's elongated, wavy treatment of animals and objects reveal the influence of the technique on their imagery.

Grattage is a surrealist technique in painting in which (usually dry) paint is scraped off the canvas. It was employed by Max Ernst and Joan Miró.

Heatage is an automatic technique developed and used by David Hare in which an exposed but unfixed photographic negative is heated from below, causing the emulsion (and the resulting image, when developed) to distort in a random fashion.


Indecipherable Writting
In addition to its obvious meaning of writing that is illegibile or for whatever other reason cannot be made out by the reader, indecipherable writing refers to a set of automatic techniques, most developed by Romanian surrealists and falling under the heading of surautomatism. Examples include entoptic graphomania, fumage and the movement of liquid down a vertical surface.

Surrealism describes as "involuntary sculpture" those made by absent-mindedly manipulating something, such as rolling and unrolling a movie ticket, bending a paper clip, and so forth.
Latent news is a game in which an article from a newspaper is cut into individual words (or perhaps phrases) and then rapidly reassembled; see also Cut-up technique.

A mimeogram is a type of automatic art made by peeling off the backing sheets of mimeograph stencils.
The movement of liquid down a vertical surface is, as the name suggests, a technique, invented by surrealists from Romania and said by them to be surautomatic and a form of indecipherable writing, of making pictures by dripping or allowing a flow of some form of liquid down a vertical surface.


The Paranoiac-critical method is a surrealist technique developed by Salvador Dalí in the early 1930s. He employed it in the production of paintings and other artworks, especially those that involved optical illusions and other multiple images.
The Surrealists related theories of psychology to the idea of creativity and the production of art. In the mid-1930s André Breton wrote about a "fundamental crisis of the object". The object began being thought of not as a fixed external object but also as an extension of our subjective self. One of the types of objects manifested in Surrealism was the phantom object.
According to Dalí, these objects have a minimum of mechanical meaning, but when viewed the mind evokes phantom images which are the result of unconscious acts.

The paranoiac-critical arose from similar Surrealistic experiments with psychology and the creation of images such as Max Ernst’s frottage technique, which involved rubbing pencil or chalk over on paper over a textured surface and interpreting the phantom images visible in the texture on the paper.

The aspect of paranoia that Dalí was interested in and which helped inspire the method was the ability of the brain to perceive links between things which rationally are not linked. Dalí described the paranoiac-critical method as a "spontaneous method of irrational knowledge based on the critical and systematic objectivity of the associations and interpretations of delirious phenomena."
Employing the method when creating a work of art uses an active process of the mind to visualise images in the work and incorporate these into the final product. An example of the resulting work is a double image or multiple image in which an ambiguous image can be interpreted in different ways.

André Breton hailed the method, saying that Dalí's paranoiac-critical method was an "instrument of primary importance" and that it "has immediately shown itself capable of being applied equally to painting, poetry, the cinema, the construction of typical Surrealist objects, fashion, sculpture, the history of art, and even, if necessary, all manner of exegesis."

Parsemage is a surrealist and automatic method in the visual arts invented by Ithell Colquhoun in which dust from charcoal or colored chalk is scattered on the surface of water and then skimmed off by passing a stiff paper or cardboard just under the water's surface.
Photomontage is making of composite picture by cutting and joining a number of photographs.


Soufflage is a Surrealist technique originated by Jimmy Ernst in which liquid paint is blown to inspire or reveal an image.


Surautomatism is any theory or act in practice of surrealist creative production taking, or purporting to take, automatism to its most absurd limits.

In their 1945 statement Dialectique de la Dialectique, Romanian surrealists Gherashim Luca and Dolfi Trost wrote,
We have returned to the problem of knowledge through images... by establishing a clear distinction between images produced by artistic means and images resulting from rigorously applied scientific procedures, such as the operation of chance or of automatism. We stand opposed to the tendency to reproduce, through symbols, certain valid theoretical contents by the use of pictorial techniques, and believe that the unknown that surrounds us can find a staggering materialization of the highest order in indecipherable images. In generally accepting until now pictorial reproductive means, surrealist painting will find that the way to its blossoming lies in the absurd use of aplastic, objective and entirely non-artistic procedures.
The name surautomatism suggests "going beyond" automatism, but whether surautomatism is anything but a group of methods by which surrealist automatism is practiced is controversial.

Surautomatism includes cubomania, entopic graphomania and various types of what the Romanian surrealists called "indecipherable writing".


Triptography is an automatic photographic technique whereby a roll of film is used three times (either by the same photographer or, in the spirit of Exquisite Corpse, three different photographers), causing it to be triple-exposed in such a way that the chances of any single photograph having a clear and definite subject is nearly impossible. Indeed, finding any edges on the negative itself during the developing process is a nearly impossible task. Typically the developing of such a roll of film is an exercise in automatic technique in and of itself, cutting the film by counting sprocket holes alone, with no regard for the images present on the negative. The results have a quality reminiscent of the transitory period in sleep when one dream suddenly becomes another.

Creativist Christopher Thurlow claims to have discovered this technique when his urge to continue taking photographs was suddenly challenged by the fact that he had run out of un-exposed film.

SUBSCRIBED, Happy Birthday to Me, Group Launching

Journal Entry: Mon Jan 14, 2008, 2:20 AM

:new:Thank you very much for the subscription you have given me :iconmayonaisse:...Know with all my heart that I am indebted to you for doing this favor!! I promise to return very soon!!!

HAPPY NEW YEAR EVERYONE!!!

THANK YOU VERY MUCH TO ALL!!!

-GROMYKO

ITS MY BIRTHDAY YESTERDAY!!!

PLUS:

:new:

I and my Group, the Nueva Ecija Visual Artists(NUEVA) is going to have our first Group Launching...

Here is the Invitations and Poster for the Event:

Poster

Group show Poster by gromyko

Invitation:

Invitation Cover by gromyko

Group show Invitation by gromyko

:skull:
I AM ONE OF THE mODERATORS IN

:skull:
the-surreal-arts
:iconthe-surreal-arts:....

loveless by the-surreal-arts

:sun: :sun: :sun:

:worship: :icongromyko: :worship:

:meditate:







I Am the Founder and SUPREME HEADHUNTER of

:iconemptyheads: :iconemptyheads: :iconemptyheads: :iconemptyheads: :iconemptyheads: :iconemptyheads: :iconemptyheads: :iconemptyheads:

Club member of:

:iconmindoflead: :icontraditionalart: :iconeliteartists: :icontheoccultside:
:iconbetter-when-wet: :iconpainters: :iconremodernists:
:iconrawem0tion:


let's share by deviant-ARCADE :thumb30565944:
Thank you stamp by Roxcessories Openminded Stamp by ChaoticGoddess
environment stamp by environment dA stamp: Inspired by... -001- by oddmodout
  • Listening to: The Voices in my Head!!!
  • Reading: Your mind!!
  • Watching: Your every move!!
  • Playing: your game!!
  • Eating: your innocence!!
  • Drinking: your fears away!!

What better way of Ending 2006 than by Displaying the Creations of Talented Multifaceted surrealist artists that thrives in the Innermost Subconscious of DevArt...And what great way of showing my appreciation of them than by showing you these masvelous masterpieces with whom constantly bombards my eyes with symbolic meanings that roots in my mind...A surrealist like me will surely feast myself on these sweet tasting hneys...these traditionally done pieces with whom i admire, and now is exposed for you to see...deserves to be featured in news...for they are jewels in the black obsidian...they are blazing lava amidst pitchblack...they are gleaming stones among rocks...treasures among polluted waters...I give you the TREASURES OF SURREALIST TRADITIONAL ART OF 2006!!...Come now Breton, See your fruits unfold!!!


These Art works were done traditionally using any traditional media that the Hand could exerts effort with  and the mind is freely expressed..

Paintings(mixed media, acrylic, oil, watercolor,collage)
:thumb45013975: by :iconobsessiveradiohead:

Mature Content

Human conscience by amartinsdebarros
by :iconamartinsdebarros:

:thumb42534678: by :iconliviaa:

CAT'S EYE by ssup by :iconssup:

The day after by BenWinspear by :iconbenwinspear:

It's a Cockfight by PorcelynIvy by :iconporcelynivy:

parliamant of dreams ... by sivet-christophe  by :iconsivet-christophe:

Too busy mourning the libido by jamesjulier by :iconjamesjulier:

La Gota by s-caruso by :icons-caruso:

puerta by eugeniapetre by :iconeugeniapetre:

Untitled 25 by DenisMurrell by :icondenismurrell:

Hechuras IV by aasrai by :iconaasrai:

:thumb41173768: by :iconchumps:

:thumb40103099: by :iconveyselkurucu:

Things I Could Not Tell You by kaiorton by :iconkaiorton:

:thumb42224503: by :iconandreaszielenkiewicz:

:thumb42981022: by :iconmigueltio:

:thumb37304430: by :iconozgurkerembulur:

Experiment no. 4 by p-e-a-k by :iconp-e-a-k:

Forest Scene by james119 by :iconjames119:

:thumb41772865: by :iconnunwhorecommando:

:thumb41728921: by :iconnunwhorecommando:

Rocks with basket by liquidclouds by :iconliquidclouds:

Figure de La Mere. by Nazireat by :iconnazireat:

Mission Accomplished by james119 by :iconjames119:

26. National Autopsy by sytraxia by :iconsytraxia:

:thumb40944890: by :iconkainwhite1:

:thumb40471365: by :iconmarkstone:

The decaying lady v2 finished by liquidclouds  by :iconliquidclouds:

:thumb31781537: by :iconarthinker:


Drawings(Automatist or automatic drawings, Veristic or illusionistic Drawings)

dance of thought-IX- by OoooKATIoooO by :iconooookatioooo:

kurbagali kadeh by vilacassio by :iconvilacassio:

Chamber by masiani by :iconmasiani:

Orchids by greysmith by :icongreysmith:

Sans titre U by Bernardumaine by :iconbernardumaine:

Those who believe in fate... by TheMachete by :iconthemachete:

:thumb34340973: by :iconobsessiveradiohead:

NUMINOUS part by masiani by :iconmasiani:

See Saw by Deborah-Valentine by :icondeborah-valentine:

3 on Zero by arminmersmann by :iconarminmersmann:

plan a by J4K0644061x by :iconj4k0644061x:

The Eye Under The Universe by sytraxia by :iconsytraxia:

He then realised .... by SalHunter by :iconsalhunter:

A Song of Silence -drawing- by elliegreco by :iconelliegreco:

Large Lady Themepark - Finit by JonBeinart by :iconjonbeinart:

Go and Visit the creators of these treasures and shower them with your words!!!Till 2007!!!

Happy New Year to Everyone!!!
:icongromyko:
  • Listening to: The Voices in my Head!!!
  • Reading: Your mind!!
  • Watching: Your every move!!
  • Playing: your game!!
  • Eating: your innocence!!
  • Drinking: your fears away!!
What the hell is happening with DA right now?>>>IM GOIN NUTS OVER SUBMISSIONS, AND MY GALLERY IS PLAYING APPER DISAPPEAR!!!

FOR THOSE OF YOU WHO ARE INTERESTED, I POSTED A FORUM(FOr Beta Testers Only):

:eye:forum.deviantart.com/devart/be…:


JOIN THE EMPTY HEADS ID CONTEST!!!!

FRiends and Fellow Members and Watchers of the EmptyHeads, We will be Having Our first contest for the EmptyHeads ID!!!Do check out our club and the Mechanics of the contest in :iconemptyheads:!!!Keep on flilling those emptyHeads!!!

:worship:


:faint: OMG :faint:

I got DD!!!! WOOOHOOO!!!! I was surprised to see that my work Universal Prostitution got Daily Deviation!!!Thank you :iconmadnessism: for suggesting it!!Im very Honored!!!

:clap: :clap:
Universal Prostitution by gromyko
My First Daily Deviation




I GOT A SUBSCRIPTION From SABRINA :iconinthename:!!!!
:worship::thumb41581396::worship:
YAY!!! Im very glad that ive got a gift from you my friend!!!
Im very thankfull for your Kindness!!!

To all you!!!Please shower her with your visits!!!Shes a nice Friend!!! And a Beautiful Person Both inside out!!!

:worship:
                          I recently opened up a collaborative club here at DA...Its called The empty Heads club...If you are interested at joining our club, please feel free to visit us!!!

                          :iconemptyheads:

******************************************************************************************************************

Im Pleased to feature a good friend of mine here at DeviantArt that have linfluenced me recently with his fabulous and enchanting watercolors!!Who wouldnt have known the great Babar Moghal, popularly known here as NunWhoreCommando!!!:iconnunwhorecommando:

I have decided to feature five of what i think are the great works of this expert watercolorist and surrealist artist from the realms of Pakistan!!! Enjoy his sumptuous lines...His enigmatic Jesters, Wizards, and Nuns!!! Feast in his complementary colored canvas!!! And enjoy his magical Art!!!

Here are some excerpts that i found in his journal, regarding his influences, and views of Art:
"Most of my new work doesnt have any title or story, i was so annoyed by all the crap of high art, the image was getting buried under the words."

"Whats the point of painting? i see many artist in my part of the world, standing
in front of camera and defining their work inch by inch. Cut it out ! Its not a thesis. so no more words ! keep visiting."

"Although i dont paint to find meanings or answers, sometimes i look at my work and wonder how i can define it? There are no single answers. But i feel my paintings are increasingly like an instrumental music or songs in a foreign language. You may relate to it, even if you cannot understand it. The fact is that although my work is very carefully planned, even i cannot predict the out come. Just like life. As Magritte said "The purpose of art is Mystery".

And Now his Art:

:thumb41772865:      :thumb41630442:      :thumb40628540:
                  :thumb40433187:                                      :thumb39822232:

These are the people whom i loved here at DA!!!Check them all Out!!!
they are a collection of Magnificent artists!!!
:clap::clap: :clap::clap:


:iconkaiorton: :iconcmptrwhz: :iconanjeron: :iconrollaj: :iconiram: :iconojosbienabiertos: :iconbetter-when-wet: :icon123456543212345: :iconislamaia: :icontogskee: :iconpromefeuz: :iconjohntibz: :iconanipo: :iconsurrealscotty: :icondwalker1047: :iconbubble-bum: :iconkawaiione1: :icongreysmith: :iconshadowsoldier713: :iconrootbeerromance: :iconjempavia: :iconvexingart: :iconprince-des-sots: :iconsilradin: :iconernieluckman: :iconjonmelzey: :iconreyne: :iconedif: :iconerosa: :iconmomoichigo11: :icondeborah-valentine: :iconanimalu: :iconsaucyblue::iconsaraty: :iconxondria: :iconfilthian: :iconnewman2: :iconrecklesslyforgotten: :iconmedeamoon: :iconszeretet: :iconrednails13: :iconpaulchadik: :iconthepurplemonster::iconpecco: :iconicclefairy: :iconjujibla: :iconlaartista: :iconeru21: :iconlilbluhedgehog: :iconnotnothing: :iconancient-one: :iconnoahkai: :iconsirnaelyan: :iconmaya-love-u: :iconemptyheads: :iconbunnix: :iconkennethologist: :icon3sunflower: :iconjeffdork: :icontheoccultside: :iconwilmarin: :iconpaula-rosa: :iconliebestraume: :iconsedoe: :iconangstfool11: :iconaddinfusedcreativity: :iconbabykiboko: :iconhatedgoddess: :icondaytodie: :iconsurrealistictomato: :iconinthename: :iconhyperbizarre: :iconpiucca: :icon1uk3: :iconthatguywhodraws: :iconmindoflead: :iconbark: :iconominousbaltross: :icontransientzen: :iconwalrusdealer: :iconjleoc: :iconscott5353: :iconstardustgammaray: :iconquest2694: :iconisafree: :iconwinterz-edge: :iconjarmen: :iconanatuaria: :iconchaoskatie: :iconbetebrito: :icontwodimensions: :icontraditionalart: :iconsinbatollica: :iconarbri: :iconbrittendayne: :iconsnailskin: :iconmitchellp: :iconfarffignuton: :iconako-lang: :iconreapply: :iconhappyfanie: :iconveraguta: :iconsangdrax: :iconsandrapelly: :iconobleakpattern: :iconmadnessism: :iconyosun: :icongentlemansclubstock: :icondevouredex: :iconcreepmaster: :iconautumnscene: :iconfenrizulf: :iconchrizcruz: :iconhalcyonsting: :iconfalsegodz: :iconvindictivevendetta: :iconamandatory: :iconlostdarknight: :iconleonardo-bjork: :iconrokasltu: :iconarchizero: :iconno-existence87: :iconjuststupid: :iconlizamnav: :iconavaloncommunity: :iconinnocence2005: :iconsiameseworm: :iconnunwhorecommando: :iconcostantino: :iconhewsan: :iconcolddarksilent: :iconcristianoteofili: :iconeyeart: :icongrokulsky: :iconbibble: :iconjpacena: :iconkungfujoe: :iconindigochildren: :iconsidiuss: :iconinterstellaburst: :iconanuvys: :iconaliceindeadland: :iconmgillespie: :iconnordenx: :iconobsessiveradiohead: :iconasleepart: :iconarchetype-it: :iconismaelalvarez: :iconjames119: :iconroxrio: :iconsolidahmed: :iconblue-fusion: :iconjerryh: :iconleserpentquidanse: :iconvans3n: :icondisent: :iconartistsagainstwar: :icontheredherring: :iconyakiroba: :icondonnalorelei: :icongljivoink: :iconabstractsilence: :iconcybergranny: :iconwise-cat-of-wisdom: :iconmobilmasuk: :iconmoshiach: :iconharleysq: :iconectrhoi: :iconpr0jectz: :iconkali-hypochondria: :iconhoney-saccharine: :icondrkrtst: :icondarkshadowkitsune: :icondastafiz: :iconbrechnuss: :iconlailoki: :iconlotusamduat: :icondinkakitty: :iconandrepizaro: :iconinky92: :iconauksasparne: :iconbenkimse: . :iconmaay: :icondragontech22: :iconfallenrosemedia: :iconombraillum: :iconroosj: :iconmindsalcove-insanity: :icondyonissos: :iconamber-magdalena: :icontash-x: :iconspyderbug: :iconxdawg: :iconinmyveins: :iconssup: :iconazariaelle: :iconshofi: :iconhiding-in-the-light: :iconjstles: :iconphysiologoius: :iconpaul88: :iconfreakybabe: :iconjoshtherage: :iconmrichston: :iconheretimestandsstill: :iconunholyvault: :iconblackcloudconnected: :icondavegoldartgallery: :iconme-in-honey: :iconshadow-child: :iconsytraxia: :iconphilippines: :icontorvs: :iconnecag: :icondorn-redbear:

And my first watcher...
:iconkitty1297:


ILet the free Rein of imagination be Purified By Ra!!!
:icongromyko:

I Am the Founder and SUPREME HEADHUNTER of

:iconemptyheads: :iconemptyheads: :iconemptyheads: :iconemptyheads: :iconemptyheads: :iconemptyheads: :iconemptyheads: :iconemptyheads:

Recent member of:

:iconmindoflead: :icontraditionalart: :iconeliteartists: :icontheoccultside: :iconbetter-when-wet:


also check out: :icondogeatdogworld: Im one of the qualified Judges in the said community!!!

let's share by deviant-ARCADE