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European Union
By gregi989   |   Watch
18 27 253 (1 Today)
Published: March 16, 2019
© 2019 gregi989
Since Brexit is not really coming today I present You nice looking but cursed flag You all know veeeeery well - the flag of European Union. Officially it's called the Flag of Europe and consists of a circle of 12 golden stars on a blue background. The blue is said to represent the West, while the number and position of the stars represent completeness and unity, respectively (nice joke right? xD). Enjoy :D

It is a political and economic union of 28 member states that are located primarily in Europe. It has an area of 4,475,757 km2 and an estimated population of about 513 million. The EU has developed an internal single market through a standardised system of laws that apply in all member states in those matters, and only those matters, where members have agreed to act as one. EU policies aim to ensure the free movement of people, goods, services and capital within the internal market, enact legislation in justice and home affairs and maintain common policies on trade, agriculture, fisheries and regional development. For travel within the Schengen Area, passport controls have been abolished. A monetary union was established in 1999 and came into full force in 2002 and is composed of 19 EU member states which use the euro currency.

Constitutionally, the EU bears some resemblance to both a confederation and a federation, but has not formally defined itself as either. (It does not have a formal constitution: its status is defined by the Treaty of European Union and the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union). It is more integrated than a traditional confederation of states because the general level of government widely employs qualified majority voting in some decision-making among the member states, rather than relying exclusively on unanimity. It is less integrated than a federal state because it is not a state in its own right: sovereignty continues to flow 'from the bottom up', from the several peoples of the separate member states, rather than from a single undifferentiated whole. [For how long though xddddd]

Covering 7.3% of the world population, the EU in 2017 generated a nominal gross domestic product (GDP) of 19.670 trillion US dollars, constituting approximately 24.6% of global nominal GDP. Additionally, all 28 EU countries have a very high Human Development Index, according to the United Nations Development Programme. In 2012, the EU was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. Through the Common Foreign and Security Policy, the EU has developed a role in external relations and defence. The union maintains permanent diplomatic missions throughout the world and represents itself at the United Nations, the World Trade Organization, the G7 and the G20. Because of its global influence, the European Union has been described as an emerging superpower.

During the interwar period, the consciousness that national markets in Europe were interdependent though confrontational, along with the observation of a larger and growing US market on the other side of the ocean, nourished the urge for the economic integration of the continent. In 1920, advocating the creation of a European economic union, British economist John Maynard Keynes wrote that "a Free Trade Union should be established ... to impose no protectionist tariffs whatever against the produce of other members of the Union." During the same decade, Richard von Coudenhove-Kalergi, one of the first to imagine of a modern political union of Europe, founded the Pan-Europa Movement. His ideas influenced his contemporaries, among which then Prime Minister of France Aristide Briand. In 1929, the latter gave a speech in favour of a European Union before the assembly of the League of Nations, precursor of the United Nations. In a radio address in March 1943, with war still raging, Britain's leader Sir Winston Churchill spoke warmly of "restoring the true greatness of Europe" once victory had been achieved, and mused on the post-war creation of a "Council of Europe" which would bring the European nations together to build peace.

After World War II, European integration was seen as an antidote to the extreme nationalism which had devastated the continent. In a speech delivered on 19 September 1946 at the University of Zürich, Switzerland, Winston Churchill went further and advocated the emergence of a United States of Europe. The 1948 Hague Congress was a pivotal moment in European federal history, as it led to the creation of the European Movement International and of the College of Europe, where Europe's future leaders would live and study together.

It also led directly to the founding of the Council of Europe in 1949, the first great effort to bring the nations of Europe together, initially ten of them. However, the Council focused primarily on values—human rights and democracy—rather than on economic or trade issues, and was always envisaged as a forum where sovereign governments could choose to work together, with no supra-national authority. It raised great hopes of further European integration, and there were fevered debates in the two years that followed as to how this could be achieved.

But in 1952, disappointed at what they saw as the lack of progress within the Council of Europe,six nations decided to go further and created the European Coal and Steel Community, which was declared to be "a first step in the federation of Europe". European leaders Alcide De Gasperi from Italy, Jean Monnet and Robert Schuman from France, and Paul-Henri Spaak from Belgium understood that coal and steel were the two industries essential for waging war, and believed that by tying their national industries together, future war between their nations became much less likely. These men and others are officially credited as the founding fathers of the European Union.

In 1957, Belgium, France, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, and West Germany signed the Treaty of Rome, which created the European Economic Community (EEC) and established a customs union. They also signed another pact creating the European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom) for co-operation in developing nuclear energy. Both treaties came into force in 1958.

The EEC and Euratom were created separately from the ECSC, although they shared the same courts and the Common Assembly. The EEC was headed by Walter Hallstein (Hallstein Commission) and Euratom was headed by Louis Armand (Armand Commission) and then Étienne Hirsch. Euratom was to integrate sectors in nuclear energy while the EEC would develop a customs union among members.

During the 1960s, tensions began to show, with France seeking to limit supranational power. Nevertheless, in 1965 an agreement was reached and on 1 July 1967 the Merger Treaty created a single set of institutions for the three communities, which were collectively referred to as the European Communities. Jean Rey presided over the first merged Commission (Rey Commission).

In 1973, the Communities were enlarged to include Denmark (including Greenland, which later left the Communities in 1985, following a dispute over fishing rights), Ireland, and the United Kingdom. Norway had negotiated to join at the same time, but Norwegian voters rejected membership in a referendum. In 1979, the first direct elections to the European Parliament were held.

Greece joined in 1981, Portugal and Spain following in 1986. In 1985, the Schengen Agreement paved the way for the creation of open borders without passport controls between most member states and some non-member states. In 1986, the European flag began to be used by the EEC and the Single European Act was signed.

In 1990, after the fall of the Eastern Bloc, the former East Germany became part of the Communities as part of a reunified Germany. A close fiscal integration with the introduction of the euro was not matched by institutional oversight making things more troubling. Attempts to solve the problems and to make the EU more efficient and coherent had limited success.

The European Union was formally established when the Maastricht Treaty—whose main architects were Helmut Kohl and François Mitterrand—came into force on 1 November 1993. The treaty also gave the name European Community to the EEC, even if it was referred as such before the treaty. With further enlargement planned to include the former communist states of Central and Eastern Europe, as well as Cyprus and Malta, the Copenhagen criteria for candidate members to join the EU were agreed upon in June 1993. The expansion of the EU introduced a new level of complexity and discord. In 1995, Austria, Finland, and Sweden joined the EU.

In 2002, euro banknotes and coins replaced national currencies in 12 of the member states. Since then, the eurozone has increased to encompass 19 countries. The euro currency became the second largest reserve currency in the world. In 2004, the EU saw its biggest enlargement to date when Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia, and Slovenia joined the Union.

In 2007, Bulgaria and Romania became EU members. The same year, Slovenia adopted the euro, followed in 2008 by Cyprus and Malta, by Slovakia in 2009, by Estonia in 2011, by Latvia in 2014, and by Lithuania in 2015.

On 1 December 2009, the Lisbon Treaty entered into force and reformed many aspects of the EU. In particular, it changed the legal structure of the European Union, merging the EU three pillars system into a single legal entity provisioned with a legal personality, created a permanent President of the European Council, the first of which was Herman Van Rompuy, and strengthened the position of the High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy.

In 2012, the EU received the Nobel Peace Prize for having "contributed to the advancement of peace and reconciliation, democracy, and human rights in Europe." In 2013, Croatia became the 28th EU member.

From the beginning of the 2010s, the cohesion of the European Union has been tested by several issues, including a debt crisis in some of the Eurozone countries, increasing migration from the Middle East, and the United Kingdom's withdrawal from the EU. A referendum in the UK on its membership of the European Union was held in 2016, with 51.9% of participants voting to leave. The UK formally notified the European Council of its decision to leave on 29 March 2017 initiating the formal withdrawal procedure for leaving the EU, committing the UK to leave the EU on 29 March 2019.

Main Source Used: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European…
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Comments27
anonymous's avatar
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soulessone12's avatar
the EU, a lesson of the folly's of chasing superpower status when your people aren't even united 
gregi989's avatar
gregi989Student Digital Artist
Exactly - worse - when your people do not want to be united xd
AdmiralMichalis's avatar
I don't know about you, but is my daily prayer that the EU collapses into dust sooner than later.
gregi989's avatar
gregi989Student Digital Artist
It is neither that bad nor that good as both sides claim - but I agree in its current form it should be removed
AdmiralMichalis's avatar
Years ago I would have agreed with that statement.  However, given the fact that the EU continues to enforce a policy of economic servitude on Southern Europe and given that they seem completely content with throwing democracy out a window, I have to lean closer to the extreme.  The EU as a political and monetary force must go.
gregi989's avatar
gregi989Student Digital Artist
That is true - what I meant that it's neither good or bad I meant rather small things like the food quality norm that is actually worth it - in big picture though it would be better for EU to collapse
AdmiralMichalis's avatar
Well it is true that the EU has done good things, of course.  However, as of recently it has done too much damage to let pass.  I think many of these positives could have taken place on the nation-state level as well.
gregi989's avatar
gregi989Student Digital Artist
Its true and I also agree that in current form it should be abolished just wanted to point out some good things that came from it ;)
jennnywakeman404's avatar
Article 13 passed.......now I feel bad for those Europeans they won't be able to watch memes
gregi989's avatar
gregi989Student Digital Artist
Indeed its very sad day for all xd
Beastboss's avatar
BeastbossHobbyist Photographer
The flag only an odious fop would wave
gregi989's avatar
gregi989Student Digital Artist
Exactly xd - design is kinda cool thought though ;)
C-ATP's avatar
This is the toilet seat in Europe.;) (Wink) 
gregi989's avatar
gregi989Student Digital Artist
Lightly speaking xD - design is interesting though ;)
Dentlos's avatar
DentlosHobbyist General Artist
Secretly a reincarnation of the Soviet Union.
gregi989's avatar
gregi989Student Digital Artist
Bullshit xd its NOWHERE even near what the Soviet Union was - do your history first because if You did it you would know that it closely resembles german MittelEuropa concept xd
Dentlos's avatar
DentlosHobbyist General Artist
It's a joke dude, i wasn't being serious at all, but with article 13 it might as well be the Soviet Union.
gregi989's avatar
gregi989Student Digital Artist
Still nope xD as say 3rd Reich also had even greater censorship ;)
Dentlos's avatar
DentlosHobbyist General Artist
That too.
zacharyknox222's avatar
zacharyknox222Hobbyist Artist
i love it!
gregi989's avatar
gregi989Student Digital Artist
Thank You :D
zacharyknox222's avatar
zacharyknox222Hobbyist Artist
i like it!
gregi989's avatar
gregi989Student Digital Artist
;)
anonymous's avatar
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