Details

Closed to new replies
April 23, 2015
Link

Statistics

Replies: 24

Artist's Alley ban on selling fanart merchandise???

:iconaaronperezplz:
aaronperezplz Featured By Owner Apr 23, 2015
So I plan on being a first time exhibitor at Anime Expo's Artist's Alley this year, but I'm a tad confused on the policies they have for selling fanart merch???

(as taken from the AA packet here)

"Pseudo-merchandise includes items such as cosplay props and costumes, cosplay weapons, t-shirts,buttons, key chains, and cell phone straps that are similar to existing licensed merchandise. Please do your research before getting to work. A general rule to follow is to avoid using fanart of any type on tshirts, bags, buttons, stickers, key chains, and like items."

Seriously? All I ever buy, see my friends buy, and see what others online have hauled from AX AA is fanart merch (such as black butler, avengers, legend of zelda--basically everything seen here).

What's the deal?? On one hand I'm like no problem everyone's selling fanart merch, but on the other hand I'm very concerned :nirvana:
Reply

You can no longer comment on this thread as it was closed due to no activity for a month.

Devious Comments

:iconplumli:
Plumli Featured By Owner Apr 24, 2015
Yeah the issue is that prints is more like your own original art. But once we're into keychains and bags, the official thing will probably have their own key chains and bag. A lot of 'artists' more or less just stick screenshots on pins too at some cons I noticed so it's a way to encourage actual artistry.

The trick is just don't get caught doing stuff you know the copyright holders don't like. Disney, Marvel, Homestruck tend to not like this. But DC or CLAMP probably don't give a damn if you start selling keychains with their characters on it.
Reply
:iconmondu:
mondu Featured By Owner Edited Apr 24, 2015
Because selling fanart is, technically, illegal?

The artists/company that own the original franchise don't have time and money to go after every artist. However, if they catch wind that someone is making money of their intellectual property, the odds of being sued goes up higher.

To put it another way, there's tons of artists making mickey mouse and donald duck merchandise. Most of the time, Walt Disney ignores it. Same goes true for many japanese anime/manga companies. However, if you manage to catch Walt Disney's attention, you're fucked sideways. They've been known to send people with sandblasters to erase kindergarten walls. The writer of A Song of Ice and Fire is also very anti fan-made stuff, and it wasn't until Game of Thrones (which is owned by HBO. not G.R.R. Martin) that ASoIF/GoT fanwork was allowed in places like fanfiction.net. I heard Doraemon's writer is also very protective of his work.

It looks like the organizers of anime expo are trying to keep a low profile and not attract too much attention.
Reply
:iconbacusillustrations:
BacusIllustrations Featured By Owner Apr 23, 2015  Professional Traditional Artist
BY THE POWER OF COPYRIGHT!
 Copyright definition: the exclusive right to make copieslicense, and otherwise exploit literary, musical, or artistic work, whether printed, audio, video, etc.:works granted such right by law on or after January 1, 1978, are protected for the lifetime of the author or creator and for a period of 50 years after his or her death.

Basically It means the rights to create copies of an image are only for reserved for the creator, and whatever company may also own the rights to that creation (For example Naruto is copyrighted by Kishimoto, Shounen Jump, etc. companies; so only they and people who get their permission by law to draw Naruto can do so. ) 

Technically, all the prints, buttons, other merch sold at conventions that is based on existing shows and characters is illegal. Why do people do it still with no consequence you ask? Simply because if big companies that owned the copyrights of everything popular in the manga/anime/comic book scene chased after every single artist who has made a profit off their copyrighted work; they'd be broke from all the legal fees from suing thousands upon thousands of artists. However, it doesn't mean they won't stay quiet. They could easily go after artists that are huge with selling fan art and make a lot of money doing it. OR they could threaten legal action against the people running the convention, which could easily mean the end of that convention. 

From what I see here Anime Expo may ( JUST GOING OFF A HUNCH I HAVE NO EVIDENCE) have gotten flack in the past for its fan art merch distribution; and is cracking down. 

I know a lot of people like to buy other renditions of known characters, heck I've done it in the past (I've got several hanging in my room). But I think it would be even better if con goers would focus less on art they recognize and look in artist alleys for creative original work. You help support the artist's cause by buying awesome original work; and if you want work based on existing characters, then commission it instead.

 I think it's sad to go to conventions and see awesome artists with beautiful original artwork and no one at their tables, while artists with the same level skill ( or more, or less ) get people crowding around their booth for some cool prints of the hottest anime that year; and that's ALL they sell.

Pardon my little rant, had to get it out there. It doesn't say prints in those rules though so you might want to contact them to find out if prints are OK. 
Reply
:iconmischievouspooka:
MischievousPooka Featured By Owner Apr 24, 2015  Professional General Artist
 I went and sold anime artist alleys.  One of the problems is that a lot of young people mostly just care of what is popular and not a lot of original stuff.  Most anime cons are filled with these young people   so you have to figure out what catches their attention.   I was able to sell original art, mostly of cute kitties and a creepy vulture.  People really need to study the customers that come to figure out what type of originals will sells.  I realize that there are a lot of people that like cats so I went with making a lot of cat buttons and prints.  And my other friend made a whole group of artwork based on fat cats and that also sell really well at cons.  As for the vulture, I notice that there are more and more people that are going to cons that like creepy themes so I am going to need to make some more of those.

But for a con that con goers are looking for more original art is the furry cons.  I been to a few of them and had people buy art that was original furry or not furry related.  Even thought furries get a lot of bad publicity, they seem more willing to support artist for original art more than the other fandoms.
Reply
:iconbacusillustrations:
BacusIllustrations Featured By Owner Apr 24, 2015  Professional Traditional Artist
Very interesting notation, Thank you Pooka :) 

Yeah that's another thing, its all a business, so its super important to notice what the customers want. it was super smart for you to play it safe with the cat merch, everybody loves cats! XD. 

Just wish customers would be more open to looking at and buying original work :P
Reply
:iconnemothegoblin:
NemoTheGoblin Featured By Owner Apr 24, 2015
I've went to a few cons, and didn't see almost anything original in the print department. Just rather lack luster anime prints. :/
Reply
:iconbacusillustrations:
BacusIllustrations Featured By Owner Apr 24, 2015  Professional Traditional Artist
I've been to Denver Comic Con and it was one of the few cons that had at least half all artists with original work. I was actually impressed. But yeah, some cons are like that and have almost nothing original.
Reply
:iconnemothegoblin:
NemoTheGoblin Featured By Owner Apr 24, 2015
It's rather disappointing. 
Reply
:iconbacusillustrations:
BacusIllustrations Featured By Owner Apr 24, 2015  Professional Traditional Artist
Agreed.
Reply
:icondarkflightsart:
DarkFlightsArt Featured By Owner Apr 24, 2015  Professional General Artist
Yes, this is what puts me off going to cons; nobody will look twice at my own art because it's not copying anything popular. I doubt I'd even make my stall fees back, let alone enough of a profit to make it worthwhile.
Reply
:iconnemothegoblin:
NemoTheGoblin Featured By Owner Apr 24, 2015
It is unfortunate. 
Reply
:iconnemothegoblin:
NemoTheGoblin Featured By Owner Apr 23, 2015
So they want to stop the sell of illegal merch, that's competing with the companies' stuff and you're upset? 
Reply
:iconaaronperezplz:
aaronperezplz Featured By Owner Apr 23, 2015
lmfao please sit down
I'm asking why Artist's Alley is primarily fan merch-based and yet there's this rule in play; how the hell do 90% of these artist booths exist every year (and return) unless there's some "loophole" I'm missing.
Reply
:iconnemothegoblin:
NemoTheGoblin Featured By Owner Apr 24, 2015
Because they just haven't done a crackdown?

Your post is coming across as "but mom, all the kids are doing it!"
Reply
:iconcamposdo:
CamposDO Featured By Owner Apr 23, 2015   Digital Artist
Fair use is only applicable when it is not commercial ... It's not so hard to understand.

In this
thread it seems you're butt hurt cause they are trying to prevent you from stealing someone else IP.
Reply
:iconaaronperezplz:
aaronperezplz Featured By Owner Apr 23, 2015
lmfao please sit down
I'm asking why Artist's Alley is primarily fan merch-based and yet there's this rule in play; how the hell do 90% of these artist booths exist every year (and return) unless there's some "loophole" I'm missing.
Reply
:iconcamposdo:
CamposDO Featured By Owner Edited Apr 23, 2015   Digital Artist
No "loophole". Fanart is not something you have the right to sell (very simple).

If they allow it anyway but also have these rules is to protect themselves if someone is sued. I'm not saying this is the case, just a possibility.
Reply
:iconwilwhalen:
WilWhalen Featured By Owner Apr 23, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
Fanart merch competes with the rights holders merch, while fanart prints don't.  Funimation (for example) sells t-shirts, so they don't want other people getting in to their market and taking away sales from them.  They don't sell prints, so as long as you aren't mass producing your prints or ripping off/tracing official stuff/using official logos you aren't directly competing with them and they don't really care.
Reply
:iconsachi-pon:
Sachi-pon Featured By Owner Apr 23, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
you should contact the organizers of the event!
Reply
:iconfionacreates:
FionaCreates Featured By Owner Apr 23, 2015  Professional General Artist
You never know who these orders could have come from. It could be Marvel or Warner Brothers or other copyright holders who have asked the con nicely to stop the sale of illegal merchandise, because that's what it is, without having to be arseholes and sue everyone, because they could. 

It could be the con con covering it's own back, or to encourage original content, or even to leave more room for original content creators because i know at the con i tabled at it was about 50/50 original to fanart, when the con prides itself on being for small press original content, so fanart should be much lower. 

I understand many cons are for fans and fanart sells big time, but it sells mostly because the original is good, not because the artist necessarily is (not always the case but quite often). If the con itself is marketed towards fans like I've seen some titled "fancon" or such fair enough, but if it's a con for other things that fanart has just slowly bled into then i can understand the con wanting to get some control back. 
Reply
:iconweremole:
weremole Featured By Owner Apr 23, 2015   Digital Artist
This is a good thing overall. It encourages original work and keeps away the bootleg and "pop art" huckster booths that can be a scourge on convections and often peddling plagiarized artwork. 
Reply
:iconbootsii:
Bootsii Featured By Owner Apr 23, 2015  Hobbyist Digital Artist
In all honesty though, con-goers aren't usually scavenging AA for original work but fan merch—
(taken from this forum thread):
"On another note, it seems silly to me that cons try to limit fanart when, realistically, legal issues are very unlikely to ensue. After all, most fans come to conventions for fanart, not original art. Therefore, it seems strange to force the artists to sell things that the attendees are most likely not interested in. Additionally, most manga artists appreciate and encourage the creation of fanart such as doujinshi back in Japan, so I don't see why things should be any different in America."
Reply
:iconweremole:
weremole Featured By Owner Apr 23, 2015   Digital Artist
That's very sad then and all the more reason to start turning the ship around. I also don't think its fair to apply Japanese standards on a market an ocean apart that Japanese rightsholders cannot control. Japanese fanartists have all agreed on that their things should not be spread. It's why their site has a "do not repost" clause and why you can only buy doujinshi at specific events.
Reply
:iconcinderblockstudios:
CinderBlockStudios Featured By Owner Apr 23, 2015  Professional Traditional Artist
just because they can't sell it doesn't mean they can't have something on display. You could still catch the eye of someone with some fan art and bring them in closer for the originals.
Reply
Add a Comment: