Group Info Group Founded 9 Years ago Statistics 142 Members
21,032 Pageviews115 Watchers

group and affiliate notices

GROUP:

on haijinik profile page you will find a donation pool for formfindsfunction contest prizes (namely premium memberships). thanks in advance for your support. :thumbsup:

DONATIONS ARE NOW BEING ACCEPTED FOR PRIZES FOR THE SECOND CONTEST!!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

here is the formfindsfunction.deviantart.c… to give FFF a llama

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

special thanks to our member Exnihilo-nihil for being the first to donate! merci, mon ami!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

AFFILIATES:

Crowns-of-Sonnets is hosting a collaborative indriso challenge. here is a crowns-of-sonnets.deviantart.c… to the blog with all the details.

Group Info

this club focuses on the various and sundry forms in the world of poetry. from the eastern forms, to traditional fixed, to the newly created and the experimental and even free verse. we will hold writing events and eventually contests that introduce our members to a plethora of forms.

group avatar by halcyonshores
Group
Founded 9 Years ago
Dec 19, 2011

Location
Global

Group Focus
Art Creation

142 Members
115 Watchers
21,032 Pageviews
Daily Pageviews

Affiliates

:iconsimplygoodpoetry::iconmulthaiku::iconprojectdfc::iconincahootsliterature::iconvicious-verse::iconbeginnersunite::iconda-literature::iconthesimulacrum::iconcreatecollaborations::icondeviantliterature::iconfixed-form-poetry::iconnotreforteressebrule::iconheart-of-poetry::iconflyltd::iconhaikus4catherine::iconbluemoonbird::iconpoetrys-renaissance::iconnapowrimo2012::iconlove-literature::iconrhyme-and-reason::iconcrowns-of-sonnets::iconmy-soul-bleeds-ink::iconminimalit::iconhammeredpoetry::iconpoetry-magnet::iconword-smiths::iconlive-love-write::iconlit-visual-alliance::iconinterdimensionalart::icona-thoughtful-pie:

Gallery Folders

form tutorials
haiga
false front: a haiga by haijinik
Itwillbethis: a haiga by haijinik
life water haiga by haijinik
elemental fugue state by haijinik
villanelle

Mature Content

terza rima
our outside pet by haijinik
hesed

Mature Content

sijo

Mature Content

hey all! i know it has been a while since i popped up here on FFF (over a year actually), but i thought i would see if an actual CONTEST might catch a bit of interest. so since i am in a foul mood and a bit of a refrain-nut i thought i would combine the two for the second official FFF contest: the 'fraidy refrain form contest!

here is what you need to know:

1) you may pick ANY form that contains the repetition of at least one line (or part of a line) in the requirements for that form. tutorials for several (but by no means ALL) options will be linked to at the bottom of this post. this requirement covers the refrain-nut part.

2) the subject matter of the poem MUST contain a horror element. monsters, madmen, mayhem...GO FOR IT! this requirement takes care of the foul-mood bit.

3) to be considered as an entry to this contest all poems must have a link to this journal and a mention of the chosen refrain form in the comments and be entered into this group's 'fraidy refrain forms contest folder by no later than 23:59 CET on april 22, 2018. this folder is open to submission by any deviant, meaning you don't have to be an FFF member to enter or win. and you may enter up to 3 poems but please make sure they are all of different forms.

4) first place will receive a 3 month subby, second and third will each get a one month subby. if the winners would rather, they can just get the points.
MagicalJoey has offered a feature and llama to the top three poets. 
if any other individual or group would like to offer other prizes please contact me via a note.

5) i am the only judge at the moment, but if anyone else is interested in helping out please let me know via a note.

that's about it. if there are any questions you can leave them in the comments or note me. have fun and i look forward to reading the entries!

now for a few tutorials...

empat empat tutorialthe emapt empat (four four), like it's cousin the pantoum, originates from malaysia. like the pantoum, it contains an incidence of whole line refrain, and quatrains with alternating rhymes. there the similarities kinda end. while with the pantoum the number of stanza's is up to the author (though there are usually at least 3), with the empat emapt there is a set 4 stanzas. also, the only refrained line is the first line of the first stanza. but, it is refrained is different places in each subsequent stanza.
the rundown:
four stanzasthe meter or syl-count is up to the poet, but remain consistent throughout the piece. the first line in the first stanza is refrained as the second line in the second stanza, the third line in the third stanza and the last line in the last stanza.traditionally the rhyme scheme as i have done it in the below example, keeping the same rhymes throughout the whole piece, but anglicized empat empat tend to allow differing secondary rhymes in each stanza, whi
bilbian sonnet tutorialthe bilbian (my last name is bilbee... what else would i call it?) sonnet came about on my bike ride home last night. i had the first and last line of the first stanza of the example below in my head and realized they were in iambic pentameter and that got the ball rolling...sorry, guys.
the rundown:
first off, it IS in iambic pentameter with a total of 14 lines... but that is the easy part.
the first and last lines of the first stanza have 2 seperate rhymes in common: one at the fifth syllable and one at the tenth. not only that, they should not so much refrain as echo one another.
a similar echo effect should appear in the third and sixth lines of the first stanza.
the last line of the second stanza is constructed by refraining the first five syllables of the first line in the first stanza and the last five syllables from the last line in the first stanza.
there should also be a haibun-type relationship between the stanzas, with the second expanding or extrapolating on the theme
pentelloum tutoriali devised the pentelloum while playing around with various refraining forms like the villanelle and the pantoum. as you will see, it isn't the easiest to get your head around, but i think it is fun.
the rundown:
- any syllable-per-line count or meter is fine, just be consistent throughout the entire piece.
- there must be at least 2 stanzas.
- there are 5 lines per stanza.
- lines 1, 3, and 5  rhyme and line 2 & 4 rhyme.
- lines 2 & 4 from the preceding stanza are refrained and become lines 1 & 3 in the current stanza.
- in the concluding stanza line 5 from the beginning stanza is refrained as line 2 and line 1 from the beginning stanza is refrained as line 4.
in the template below, the A1 would represent the fist line in the A rhyme scheme, B1 the first in the B scheme and so on so that the refrains can be more easily illustrated. the template illustrates a 3 stanza pentelloum.
A1
B1
A2
B2
A3
B1
C1
B2
C2
B3
C1
A3
C2
A1
C3
and here is an example:
pe
cinquain refrain tutorialthe cinquain refrain, not to be confused with the cinquain, is a form i devised after playing with refrain forms like the monotetra and the trijan refrain.
here is the rundown:
- there are 5 lines per stanza (no minimum or limit to the number of stanzas)
- there are eight syllables per line.
- lines 1,2, and 3 rhyme with one another
- lines 4 and 5 rhyme with one another
- there is an internal rhyme concerning the first 4 syllables of lines 2 and 3: they must be phrases that rhyme with one another. they must also rhyme with line 4.
- the first four syllables of lines 2 and 3 are refrained, in order, to create line 5.

in the template below, the numbers indicate the number of syllables per line, and the uppercase letters in parentheses indicate the rhymes. this pattern is repeated for each stanza, though it is not necessary to use the same rhymes in each stanza.
8 (A)
4 (B) 4 (A) (for a total of 8 sylls)
4 (B) 4 (A) (for a total of 8 sylls)
monotetra tutorialthe monotetra is a quirky though fairly simple little form created by michael walker.
here is the rundown:
*there must be at least 2 stanzas, though more is fine.
*each stanza has 4 lines
*within each stanza ALL lines must rhyme
*each line has 8 syllables
*the last line of each stanza is composed of a 4 syllable phrase that is repeated, in a refrainish nature.
and here is a template for a 2 stanza monotetra. the number is the number of syls per line and the capital letter denotes the rhyme. (simply follow the stanza pattern for pieces of more than 2 stanzas):
8 A
8 A
8 A
4 repeated to total 8 A
8 B
8 B
8 B
4 repeated to total 8 B
and an example:
dithering druthers
to peer into the wishing well:
will my will fate's forces quell?
or am i jailed in karma's cell?
oh, who can tell? oh, who can tell?
and if my tithe i to it cede
do i now practice faith or greed?
what is the outcome of this deed?
what to believe...what to believe...
triolet tutorialthe triolet is a 13th century french form. it can be set in either 3 stanzas or as one stanza. the meter is usually, though not always, iambic pentameter. the rhyme scheme is highly dependent on the refrains that occur frequently throughout the form. in the template below the CAPs (A & B) denote entire repeated lines while the lower case letters (a & b) simply denote a line that rhymes with the corresponding refrain:
A
B
a
A
a
b
A
B
or, in the 3 stanza form:
A
B
a
A
a
b
A
B
here is an example:
requiem of attrition
sing slow dirges for the deeds undone:
the fields left fallow; unmarried maids.
the wars, unwon, will not unslay sons!
sing slow dirges for the deeds undone.
the gods gave way, the reaper has won;
the martyrs: mummers; churches: charades.
sing slow dirges for the deeds undone:
for fields left fallow; unmarried maids.
villanelle tutorialthe villanelle is a challenging form based on french concepts. it is highly repetitive, using 2 lines as refrains throughout the form, making it hard to progress concepts, let alone a narrative. it is composed of 5 terzains (3 line stanzas) and a concluding quatrain. on the flip side, there are only 2 sets of rhyming words and no real mandatory meter or syllable count, though most modern villanelles use pentameter.
in the following template the first refrain (that is an entire line repeated not just a word or rhyme) is denoted by CAPs (A), the second refrain by BOLD (A) and the general rhyme schemes denoted in lower case ( 'a' for the lines that rhyme with the refrains and 'b' for the secondary scheme).
A
b
A
a
b
A
a
b
A
a
b
A
a
b
A
a
b
A
A
trijan refrain tutorialthe trijan refrain, created by jan turner, is a fairly simple form. it consists of 3 9 line stanzas, all sharing the same beginning line. lines 7 and 8 of each stanza are a repeated refrain of the first four syllables/words of line 5 of the same stanza. the syllable count and rhyme scheme run as per below (this pattern, shown here once, is repeated for each of the 3 stanzas):
8 / A (same LINE to begin each stanza)
6 / B
8 / A
6 / B
8 / C
8 / C
4 / D (reapted first 4 syls/words from line 5)
4 / D (reapted first 4 syls/words from line 5)
8 / C
here is an example:
lurking trijan refrain
the truth comfits our senses not;
our gates are needle's eyes.
our vision: through with darkness shot;
unfit to pierce truth's guise.
lurking along peripheries
in places we but fail to see;
     lurking along,
     lurking along
is sheer, stark actuality.
the truth comfits our senses not;
we're deaf as well as mute.
we are spawn of the omni
glosa tutorialthe glosa is originally a form of the 14th and 15th century spanish court, as a form of tribute or deference.
to begin, the writer chooses a stanza of poetry by another writer (the form is this tutorial is for the traditional choice, a quatrain, though  preface stanzas of other line counts can be used) and uses that as a sort of preface to the poem they are writing.
then the writer creates a 10 line rhyming stanzas for each line in the preface stanza, having each of those stanzas end in the according line of the preface stanza.
to illustrate this, and to more easily line out the rhyme scheme, a template is below. please note the BOLD letters denote a line from the preface poem and the same letter in regular type is merely meant to rhyme with that line:
D
H
L
P
A
B
A
B
C
D
C
C
D
D
E
F
E
F
G
H
G
G
H
H
I
J
I
J
K
L
K
K
L
L
M
N
M
N
O
P
O
O
P
P
the line length/meter/syllable count is generally mediated by that of
pantoum tutorialpantoum is a malaysian form of poetry, highly cyclical and structured in nature. i feel the best way to describe it is to annotate a poem to highlight  the structure. there is the added difficulty that in each stanza lines 1 and 3 and lines 2 and 4 must rhyme with one another.
the letters in parentheses denote an entire line of text, not simply a rhyme pattern:
holographic nothingness
(A) had a pattern
(B) with no meaning
(C) loose and scattered
(D) evading gleaning
(B) with no meaning
(E) simply racket
(D) evading gleaning
(F) thought refracted
(E)simply racket
(G) fey and delirious
(F) thought refracted
(H) interference
(G) fey and delirious
(C) loose and scattered
(H) interference
(A) had a pattern...
there is no limit to the number of stanzas, nor to the meter/syllable count per line.
the only real rules are the stanza structure, line repetition, the reversal of lines (A) and (C) in the last stanza and the needed rhymes in the alternating lines.
while it
shokuga tutorialshokuga (or hybrid) form is derived by placing haiku/senryu between the stanzas of a pantoum.
pantoum is a malaysian form of poetry, highly cyclical and structured in nature. i feel the best way to describe it is to annotate a poem to highlight  the structure.
the letters in parentheses denote an entire line of text, not simply a rhyme pattern:
(A) tinkering
(B) with the forms
(C) thinkering
(D) with no norms
(B) with the forms
(E) as lab rats
(D) with no norms
(F) mind abstracts
(E) as lab rats
(C) thinkering
(F) mind abstracts
(A) tinkering
there is no limit to the number of stanzas, nor to the meter/syllable count per line.
the only real rules are the stanza structure, line repetition, the reversal of lines (A) and (C) in the last stanza and the needed rhymes in the alternating lines.
while it is a fairly simple pattern, the challenge lies in bringing the poem into a finish that makes sense.
to make this pantoum a shokuga, write haiku/senryu that expound or illustra



CONTESTANTS:
BATTLEFAIRIES
Parsat
MagicalJoey
More Journal Entries

Deviants

Admins

Founder


:iconhaijinik:

Co-Founders


:iconalmcdermid::iconbythis::iconmadprincefeanor::iconparsat::iconprettycrazy:

Contributors


:iconbottle-in-the-sea::iconpiscesandthediamonds::iconsomnomollior:

Favourites

Journal
Poetry Form: Dodoitsu
:earth:  The Haiku Club  :pointr:  Eastern Poetry Forms  :pointr:  Dodoitsu
 
Description
Dodoitsu (都々逸 / quickly, city to city) is a form of Japanese poetry popular toward the end of the Edo Period (1603 - 1868).  Imitating folk songs it tends to focus on love or work and is often humorous in tone.  It consists of 26 syllables or less, commonly written in four lines of 7-7-7-5.
Example
Thursday afternoon is dead,
phones become silent and wait
until minutes before five
on Friday to ring
— Judi Van Gorder
ResourcesWikipedia: Dodoitsu
Examples on PoetrySoup
Examples on PoetZoom
:iconthe-haiku-club:the-haiku-club
:iconthe-haiku-club:the-haiku-club 5 1
Literature
360 Blind Eyes
360° Blind Eyes
Those street corner pharmacies don't bother me...
cooking up that crack...
serving that black...
death...
caramelizing those apples...
crystallizing that meth...
but at least it's not my kitchen...
He's Robin Hood...
on the level that Hollywood...
would be in contention...
terrorizing the scene...
mad scientist splicing the genes...
with killing machines...
but at least it's not my dimension...
They combine these positions...
with Columbine vision...
plus out-of-mind conditions...
lead to out-of-body renditions...
a suicidal homicide mission...
but at least it's not my decision...
and it's not my problem...
not my solution...
not my blood...
so it's not my ablution...
not my business...
not my institution...
it's not my crime...
so it's not my execution...
You know it's not my world...
these are not my people...
they are not my equals...
this is not my power...
this is not my evil...
this is not my chase...
they are not my steeples...
this is not my realm...
so it'
:iconMalikPeterson:MalikPeterson
:iconmalikpeterson:MalikPeterson 20 31
Journal
On Writing by Emotion
Every half serious poet has heard the advice to write from the heart; the heart: that bright chalice of inspiration, that effervescent vessel at times, that weeping willow at others. Or maybe we have heard that if something does not “write itself” the piece is not going to be as good as it could be. Although there are certain truths to these views, it would be best to dispel any illusions as quickly as possible.
Oscar Wilde says, “All bad poetry springs from genuine feeling. To be natural is to be obvious, and to be obvious is to be inartistic.” But let us digress for a moment and talk about art in general. Art is quite artificial, if only in the means that it is inanimate and non-sentient. Regardless of the accuracy or representativeness of each individual work of art to images in vivro, art never quite captures the emotional, intellectual or situational clout of the original stimulus, if indeed there is an original. Even fantasy, science-fiction or abstract art th
:iconThroneLiesFallow:ThroneLiesFallow
:iconthroneliesfallow:ThroneLiesFallow 11 13
Literature
Clerihew
The Clerihew is a form of comic verse invented by Edmund Clerihew Bentley, and championed by his friend, the novelist Gilbert Keith Chesterton. It consists of four lines of irregular length, rhymed AABB, or two uneven couplets, if you prefer to think of it that way.
Clerihews are almost always biographical, and the first line usually consists solely of the subject's name, perhaps the most famous example being:
    Sir Christopher Wren
    Said, "I am going to dine with some men.
    If anyone calls,
    Say I am designing St Paul's."

    (Bentley)
They may also be about a non-human subject:
    The art of Biography
    Is different from Geography,
    Geography is about maps,
    But Biography is about chaps.

    (Bentley)
  
Or, indeed, about a fictional ch
:iconpoetic-forms:poetic-forms
:iconpoetic-forms:poetic-forms 15 5
Literature
Ottava Rima
Ottava Rima is an eight-line form, originally Italian, having either eleven syllables per line or a line of iambic pentameter—the commonly accepted English use of the form being iambic pentameter.
The rhyme scheme is A-B-A-B-A-B-C-C, which is a moderately rigorous rhyme scheme.  This makes ottava rima an excellent stepping-stone toward writing sonnets.
The earliest known use of ottava rima is in the works of Giovanni Boccaccio, who wrote several minor poems in the form and then used it as a stanza form in several of his longer works.  This act propelled ottava rima to the primary form for epic poetry in Italy for roughly two centuries.
Ottava rima is relatively unpopular in English literature ;  several works have been produced by Romantic poets such as Shelly and Lord Byron.
We shall leave you to your writing after an example from Don Juan by Lord Byron :
    "Go, little book, from this my solitude!
   &
:iconpoetic-forms:poetic-forms
:iconpoetic-forms:poetic-forms 11 3
Literature
Rondel, Rondel Prime
* A note: In my studies of these forms (Rondeau, Rondel, Rondelet, Roundel, Rondine, etc) it becomes increasingly clear that there is little accurate information. To the best of my knowledge, this is accurate although I had to wade through acres of mislabeled works and forms to accumulate this much. Keep in mind that most definitions of these forms are rather broad and ambiguous due to the fact most people think the forms are all interchangeable or there is only one or two forms for all these different names. The truth, as I have discovered it, is rather drastically different.
Rondel:
          The Rondel is a French style of lyrical poetry that is made up of two quatrains followed by a quintet. This gives us a total of 13 lines (that can be of any length) to contain the two rhymes that follow a scheme of: ABba abAB abbaA where A and B are the refrains.
          The following is an exam
:iconpoetic-forms:poetic-forms
:iconpoetic-forms:poetic-forms 8 3
Literature
Rannaicheacht Ghairid
Irish Poetry -- Background and Information
The bard's spoken language lent itself to the natural rhythm and rhyme, and  alliteration, consonance and repetition were very important to the Irish poet.  Until the 5th Century, the only written form of Irish was Ogham, used only for carving into trees and gravestones. Therefore, poetry was oral, and based on sound structures so they would be easy to remember. When crafting medieval Irish poetry, remember that it is cyclical and the last line should end with the first syllable word or the complete line or thought, bringing it around again to the beginning.
Praise poetry was commonly practiced by the poets and there were various meters used, such as dán díreach ("straight or strict verse"). Poems were often sung to musical accompaniment. Some thought the bards had supernatural powers that came with their words. Satire, not to be confused with the modern form of satirical humor, was a poetic practice greatly feared. It was used to ridic
:iconpoetic-forms:poetic-forms
:iconpoetic-forms:poetic-forms 6 5
Literature
Bref Double
The Bref Double
The bref double is a French form. It is similar to the sonnet, but it need not be written in iambic pentameter (it can be in tetrameter, hexameter, or any other meter you prefer). The rhyme scheme is also different from a sonnet. The bref double contains three quatrains (four-line stanzas) followed by a final couplet.
a/x/b/c
x/a/x/c
a/x/a/b
a/b
The x standing for a line that doesn't rhyme with any of the other lines.
An example:
Road Closed...
With crystal rain, the sky is filled
with diamond flakes that swirl and dance
to tunes that they alone may know,
unheeded by the ears of man.
The northern winds play havoc with
mere mortal plans, as drifts now build
their buttresses of pristine white
as if to mark some hidden plan.
This land is decorated, chilled,
and sealed for all to gaze with joy;
see all the children laugh, so thrilled
to witness Mother Nature's show!
Though my intent lies thwarted, killed,
my smile grows broad at so much snow!
Copyright soulsea
:iconpoetic-forms:poetic-forms
:iconpoetic-forms:poetic-forms 9 16
Literature
The Conachlonn
The conachlann is a simple bardic form of chain verse. The last word of one line, starts as the first word of the next line. You have a bit of slight leeway, as you will see in the examples. This is a medieval Irish poetic form.
Amergin's invocation of Ireland is a very famous conachlann.
Ailim iath n-erend
Ermac muir motach
Motach sliab sreatach
Sreatach coill ciotach
Ciotach ab eascach
Easach loc lindmar
Lindmar tor tiopra
Tiopra tuath aenach
Aenach righ teamra
Teamair tor tuatach
Tuata mac milead
Mile long libearn
Libearn ard Ere
Ere ard diclass
Eber dond digbas
Diceadal ro gaet
Ro gaet ban breissi
Breissi ban buaich
[Be nadbail heriu]
Herimon or tus [hir]
hir Eber ailseas
Ailim iath n-erend

(The poem translated, translator was unattributed on the web)
I invoke the land of Eire:  
much coursed by the fertile sea.  
Fertile is the fruit-strewn mountain  
fruit strewn by the showery wood showery is the river of waterfalls  
of waterfa
:iconpoetic-forms:poetic-forms
:iconpoetic-forms:poetic-forms 7 8
Literature
Sapphic Verse
Sapphic Verse
Made famous by the greek poetess Sappho of Lesbos, c 600 BC - the Sapphic stanza is a metric poetic form spanning 4 lines.
The form has 3 hendecasyllabic lines - Each consisting of the following metric feet: trochee, trochee, dactyl, trochee, trochee
The fourth, concluding line has a Dactyl followed by a Trochee - this last line is known as the Adonic or Adonean line.
A brief note on the metric feet used in Sapphic Verse -
A Trochee is a two syllable foot, which follows a 'DAH-dah' rhythm
e.g 'TRO-chee'
A Dactyl is a three syllable foot, which follows a 'DAH-dah-dah' rhythm
e.g 'DAC-tyll-ic'
An example:
'Sapphics' by Algernon Charles Swinburne
Saw the white implacable Aphrodite,
Saw the hair unbound and the feet unsandalled
Shine as fire of sunset on western waters;
Saw the reluctant. . .
to show the metric pattern -
SAW the / WHITE im- / PLACable / APHro- / DIte
SAW the / HAIR un- / BOUND and the / FEET un- / SANDalled
SHINE as / FIRE of / SUNset on / WESTe
:iconpoetic-forms:poetic-forms
:iconpoetic-forms:poetic-forms 7 9
Literature
Palindromes
Sotades invented palindromes in Greek-ruled Egypt, back in the 3rd century BC. In fact, palindromes were once known as "Sotadic verses." He was thrown into the sea (wrapped in lead) by King Ptolemy II, for insulting the king in one of his verses.
They were quite popular in the 1800's, but have not shared much popularity since around the 1930's.
Palindrome comes from the Greek words "palin" (again or back) and "dramein" (to run). So if you read that backwards, it translates loosely into "to run back."
The palindrome simply reads the same forwards and backwards, usually with a central focal point from where it begins to read backwards. There are several ways to write palindrome poems, three are presented here, along with examples.
1. It can be read backwards, with the same words, such as the example below.
Example:
Love/Hate Relationship
by Paula Brown
Love
Mimics hate:
Passionate always, forging forward.
Unquiet rage screams
Poetry.
Tangled mercilessly;
Emotion
—mirrors—
Emotion,
:iconpoetic-forms:poetic-forms
:iconpoetic-forms:poetic-forms 13 7
Literature
The Glosa
The glosa is an early Renaissance form that was developed by poets of the Spanish court in the 14th and 15th centuries. In a glosa, tribute is paid to another poet. The opening quatrain, called a cabeza, is by another poet, and each of their four lines are imbedded elsewhere in the glosa.
The opening quatrain is followed by four stanzas, each of which is generally ten lines long, that elaborate or "glosses" on the cabeza chosen. Each ending line (10th line) of the four following stanzas is taken from the cabeza.
The usual rhyme scheme of a glosa is final word rhyming of the 6th, 9th and the borrowed 10th lines.
Example
Irish Pride and Prejudice
(Glosa verse by Darren Anderson)
In the deserts of the heart
Let the healing fountain start,
In the prison of his days
Teach the free man how to praise.
W.H. Auden
In memory of W.B. Yeats

A putrid scene of civil conflict
returns without regret,
festering in dead hearts,
lacking the fortitude to forgive.
Waiting, we long for
:iconpoetic-forms:poetic-forms
:iconpoetic-forms:poetic-forms 9 3
Literature
The Acrostic
An acrostic poem is created by arranging the first letter of each line so that they flow in alphabetical order, or form a word or phrase. Rhyme and meter aren't issues in this style of poetry, which causes some to consider it not poetry at all. Also, the only set length is that of what you choose to represent with the first letters. However, it's been around for thousands of years. This style was common among the Greeks and derived from the Greek words akros, "at the end," and stichos, "line". It was used by Latin playwrights and Medieval monks; it was popular in the Middle High German and Italian renaissance periods. If it please ya, learn more from the links below.
An example:
Mounting the sky, higher and higher;
Oblivious to we who dwell below;
Only she feels the warmth of the sun
Now that he has set.
The subject of this poem is the "moon", as indicated by the bolded letters.
Links:
http://humanities.byu.edu/rhetoric/Figures/A/acrostic.htm
http://members.fortunecity.com/mrk/help/acr
:iconpoetic-forms:poetic-forms
:iconpoetic-forms:poetic-forms 6 4
Literature
The Cinquain
****Cinquains****
Before Adelaide Crapsy developed her version, a cinquain had the same definition as quintain. These are both poems of five lines with varying rhyme, though most often forming the familiar 'abab' layout. Ms. Crapsy's version of a cinquain is somewhat different. While she was American, Japanese poetry was an obvious influence.
The style still contains five lines, but the syllables of each are strictly measured. The first and fifth contain two syllables apiece. Line two has four syllables, line three is allottted six, and the fourth line contains eight. This gives you a grand total of twenty-two syllables in which to express yourself. Rhyme is optional in this version.
An example of a cinquain:
Line 1: Thunder,
:iconpoetic-forms:poetic-forms
:iconpoetic-forms:poetic-forms 6 4
Literature
The Tetractys
The tetractys, made famous by Pythagoras, has become a modern poetry form. Ten was thought to be a number of power, and by having the lines leading up to the last line equal ten, it seemed logical for the creator of the tetractys poetry form to name it such.
A tetractys has in total, five lines. The syllables are as follows:
First Line - 1 syllable
Second Line - 2 syllables
Third Line - 3 syllables
Fourth Line - 4  syllables
Fifth Line - 10 syllables
In any formatting, it gives a triangle shape. It can be reversed, starting with the ten lines, and moving downwards for a "reversed tetractys." There are also what is called "double tetractys" in which two you have a tetractys followed immediately by a second tetractys. A normal tetractys followed by a reversed tetractys would give you a diamond shape.
There is no set rhyme scheme for a tetractys, you can choose to rhyme or not. Here are two examples from Ray Stebbing, who credits himself with coming up with this form:
Bulk
teete
:iconpoetic-forms:poetic-forms
:iconpoetic-forms:poetic-forms 7 10
Literature
The Rictameter
A rictameter is an interesting, and visually beautiful type of poem. When centered, it looks much like a diamond. It is similar in idea to a haiku as far as the spirit of the poem, but seems to be an evolution of a cinquain.
To form a rictameter, you start with a line of two syllables, then consecutively increase each syllable number in the next lines by two, until you reach ten syllables in the fifth line. Then, you start decreasing by two syllables, until you reach the same two syllable line you started with.
The syllables would look something like this per line: 2,4,6,8,10,8,6,4,2.
If you wish to experiment with a rictameter, there are a number of ways to do so, one of which, the simplest, is to not use the same 2 syllable word from line one in line nine. There are also "double rictameters" which is basically one poem, of two rictameters in a row, which again is very visually expressive. There is also the inverted rictameter, in which you start with a ten syllable line, go down to a
:iconpoetic-forms:poetic-forms
:iconpoetic-forms:poetic-forms 6 12

Comments


Add a Comment:
 
:iconlifeofsherman:
LifeOfSherman Featured By Owner Dec 5, 2016  Student Writer
Can I request a folder be made for poems with rhyme schemes that don't fit in the other categories? Just...poems that rhyme?
Reply
:iconhaijinik:
haijinik Featured By Owner Dec 5, 2016  Student Writer
free verse is rhe best i can do for you there. sorry.
Reply
:iconlifeofsherman:
LifeOfSherman Featured By Owner Dec 5, 2016  Student Writer
That's fine. :)
Reply
:iconbattlefairies:
BATTLEFAIRIES Featured By Owner Sep 8, 2016
Thank you for accepting me!
Reply
:iconlifeofsherman:
LifeOfSherman Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2016  Student Writer
May I recommend making a palindrome folder? I wrote one just now and it's in the free verse folder for now, but I would prefer it to be in its own specific folder if possible. :)
Reply
:iconparsat:
Parsat Featured By Owner May 2, 2016   Writer
Can you describe that form for us?
Reply
:iconlifeofsherman:
LifeOfSherman Featured By Owner May 2, 2016  Student Writer
It's a poem that reads the same forward as it does backwards. Other than that there aren't really any restrictions.
Reply
:iconparsat:
Parsat Featured By Owner May 3, 2016   Writer
I created the folder and moved your piece to it.
Reply
(1 Reply)
:iconpinkymccoversong:
PinkyMcCoversong Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2015  Professional Writer
I've been writing found poetry pantoums, with a bit of a twist. Just submitted a few. If you see 17 line pantoums, that's why!
Reply
:iconprettycrazy:
PrettyCrazy Featured By Owner Mar 25, 2015  Hobbyist Writer
Cool, experiment away!
Reply
Add a Comment: