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Zhejiangopterus linhaiensis by EmperorDinobot Zhejiangopterus linhaiensis by EmperorDinobot
Zhejiangopterus is an Asian azdarchid that could reach up to 7 meters from wingtip to wingtip. It's also the best preserved one.
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:iconjconway:
jconway Featured By Owner Feb 24, 2008
Nice, but I think you've missed the real strangeness of it's proportions. The head is at least twice as big as you've drawn it. Check out: [link]
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:iconjohnfaa:
JohnFaa Featured By Owner Feb 1, 2009  Student Writer
As far as I'm concerned the uropatagia wasn't so well developed as you depict it, and the main patagia attached to the hind limbs
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:iconjconway:
jconway Featured By Owner Mar 27, 2009
Both are possible, but not demonstrated, as far as I know. I do show uropatagia attached to the hip, rather than the tail now.
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:iconjohnfaa:
JohnFaa Featured By Owner Apr 1, 2009  Student Writer
AFAIK there is an azhdarchoid fossil from Brazil that shows the patagium connecting to the backlimbs. Such broad wings would be better than your thin wings when it comes to a terrestrial soarer
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:iconjconway:
jconway Featured By Owner Apr 25, 2009
Yeah, that fossil isn't as unequivocal as it could be. I hear that it's also probably a tapejarid, not an azharchid. The thin v. thin wing thing depend on the type of soaring, of course. Being a terrestrial soarer doesn't necessarily mean being a thermal soarer.
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:iconjohnfaa:
JohnFaa Featured By Owner Apr 25, 2009  Student Writer
(if I replied twice its DA's fault)

But azhdarchids and tapejarids were closely related, so its likely that, if tapejarids had broad wings, azhdarchids would have too. Plus, there aren't a lot of dynamic soarers nowdays that aren't marine, and its quite clear azhdarchids weren't sea bird like at all. Plus, pterosaurs have muscle fibers in the wings, so perhaps they could contract the wing membrane if they had too (though likely it would be too energy expensive to full time sea bird like pterosaurs like ornithocheiroids)
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:iconjconway:
jconway Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2009
There aren't a lot of flying animals around that look anything like azhdarchids, so I'd be hesitant to take analogous reasoning too far with their flight capabilities.

Jim Cunningham's aerodynamic work on Quetzalcoatlus suggests that a narrow wing (relatively) free of an extended hind limb gives superior performance to the broad-winged model. Of course, that's not definitive, animals are suboptimal in many ways, but I wouldn't dismiss it out of hand.
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:iconjohnfaa:
JohnFaa Featured By Owner Apr 25, 2009  Student Writer
But both tapejarids and azhdarchids are fairly closely related. And there aren't a lot of non-thermal soarers inland nowdays (at least big ones), so one can only assume the saame was back then.
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:iconemperordinobot:
EmperorDinobot Featured By Owner Feb 24, 2008
Jesus Christ, what a freak!

I kinda of...cheated. I didn't find a good um...reconstruction to base the proportions off, so I decided to use a few drawings I found, and other pterosauria.

I ought to do another one. These animals are just...wow.
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:iconjconway:
jconway Featured By Owner Feb 25, 2008
Most drawing of pterosaurs out there are really, really bad. Never trust them.
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:iconemperordinobot:
EmperorDinobot Featured By Owner Feb 25, 2008
Yup, c'est vrai.


I almost never trust them, but little chance did I have.
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:iconjacobspencerkaiju79:
JacobSpencerKaiju79 Featured By Owner Feb 23, 2008   Traditional Artist
that's a very good pterosaur.
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:iconemperordinobot:
EmperorDinobot Featured By Owner Feb 23, 2008
Thanks!
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:icondilong-paradoxus:
Dilong-paradoxus Featured By Owner Feb 23, 2008  Hobbyist Photographer
Cool!
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:iconpaleo12:
Paleo12 Featured By Owner Feb 23, 2008
The beak and they eye look a little odd to me but then again I know nothing about this "azdarchid" anyway. GOOD job though.

P.S. Is an Azdarchid any flying mesozoic creature?
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:iconpaleo12:
Paleo12 Featured By Owner Feb 26, 2008
Yeah I usually call all of them pterasours but ramphorincus doesn't seem so be a pterosaur. I knew that pterosaurs live in the mesozoic. My question was a little badly written, What i meant was whether or not azdarchid is the classification of all mesozoic flyers (or gliders) as in pterosaurs, ramphorincus, quetzalcoatlus,etc.
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:iconjohnfaa:
JohnFaa Featured By Owner Feb 1, 2009  Student Writer
"Azhdarchid" (note that the correct spelling has an h in front of the d) is a term used to describe Quetzalcoatlus and kin, which are huge, tailess pterosaurs with very long necks (plus some other features I'm not remembering now). Because of their terrestrial adaptations they likely were like massive storks.

"Pterosaur" is the term used to describe the flying reptiles of the Mesozoic. That applies to azhdarchids, Rhamphorhynchus, etc.
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:iconemperordinobot:
EmperorDinobot Featured By Owner Feb 23, 2008
Azdarchids are pterosaurs. Pterosaurs lived during the mesozoic :p You should know that:lol: It's related to Quetzalcoatlus.
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