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Spinosaurus aegyptiacus by EmperorDinobot Spinosaurus aegyptiacus by EmperorDinobot
The mysterious pharaoh of north Africa, the longest theropod of all, the sail backed plundered of all shores: Spinosaurus, the thorny or spiny reptile in all its glory. Most of the old uncovered remains were destroyed at the Berlin Museum in 1943, but more discoveries have been made.

If anything, it was a lumbering, humped theropod concerned with eating whatever it could catch, whether it be dead sauropods, dead Ouranosaurus and Lurdusaurus, sea creatures or gigantic dead sauropods. This may have been one of those lazy apex predators that still relied on recycled energy and sunlight. But it was still a formidable force against its gigantic sauropod prey (paralititan), and it's competition Carcharodontosaurus the shark toothed reptile seen here: [link]

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:iconthearchosaurqueen:
TheArchosaurQueen Featured By Owner Dec 5, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Not bad at all :).

Although I still personally like the idea of “at lest” slightly feathered Spinosaurs, because while they are related to crocodiles, I think they would look like a cross between crocodile and pelican.
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:iconemperordinobot:
EmperorDinobot Featured By Owner Dec 6, 2012
Why would anything so ridiculously large need any insulation at all in a tropical equatorial environment?
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:iconthearchosaurqueen:
TheArchosaurQueen Featured By Owner Dec 6, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
For the same reason why Homos, Rhinoceros and Elephants aren’t 100% hairless. Inheritance. If Megalosaurs were even slightly feathered, Spinosars would still likely have traces of it on their bodies all their lives. Also, Ostriches live in hot climates and use thick primitive plumage for daily life, so even large animals can find new ways of making old adaptations work in their favors.
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:iconemperordinobot:
EmperorDinobot Featured By Owner Dec 6, 2012
Evidence is there for animals up to 6m long. There's no evidence for animals 13-17m long. Should evidence appear, then they will all have their fuzz.
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:iconarchanubis:
Archanubis Featured By Owner Edited Nov 19, 2014
Actually, there's evidence for feathered therapods larger than 6m - Yutyrannus was a 9m (30ft) relative of Tyrannosaurus that was found with a feathered covering.  So it's looking highly likely that at least members of the coelurosaur therapods had feathers at some stage of their lives (there have been skin impressions found of larger tyrannosaurs - Tyrannosaurus, Tarbosaurus, and Gorgosaurus - that show they were covered in scales, so the adults may have lost them as they grew).  Now, whether non-coelurosaur therapods like Spinosaurus (which is considered a member of the larger Megalosaur family) had feathers is probably going to be debated for awhile, at least until someone finds evidence one way or another.  To my knowledge, only three non-coelurosaur fossils have been found with feathers, and all three are ornithschians (the "bird-hipped" dinosaurs).
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:iconemperordinobot:
EmperorDinobot Featured By Owner Nov 23, 2014
Don't talk to me like I'm new to this. It insults my intelligence.
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:iconthearchosaurqueen:
TheArchosaurQueen Featured By Owner Dec 6, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Agreed.

I didn't want this to sound like an argument in any way, just stating my view point.
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:iconemperordinobot:
EmperorDinobot Featured By Owner Dec 7, 2012
I know. It's just that now days all dinosaurs are feathered. Yes, the evidence is overwhelming, buuuut these animals developed such integument for defense (quills, flight) and to keep themselves warm. Spinosaurus fixed that problem with the hump. Not only did it store massive amounts of fat, but it had the solar oven thing going for it. So it was always warm. If it entered a freezing river, it could use the stored fat and heat to hunt. That's why I've envisioned it as a gigantic lazy apex predator who had no enemies except maybe an overgrown Paralititan. This thing didn't need the extra heat, could travel forever in one lifetime, and basically didn't worry about a damn thing on its environment. It's the perfect animal. Always warm, always active, always on the hunt, always able to find carcass, etc. Imagine a fat but active guy living close to an all you can eat buffet during the summer! If it's cold, he's not gonna wear a huge coat, since he's so warm already. Endless food supply adds to the warmth, and he's so big nobody's gonna mess with him.

That also makes them rare. In addition to shifting Saharan sands, which makes fossils hard to find, this thing was a rarity in the wild. 1 per 100 different prey. And it could probably live beyond 100 years. If anything this is a gigantic carnivorous camel/crocodile living in the tropics. Which is why I deem feather unnecessary. Camels have little hair, have 45 year lifespans, and are totally ok with their warm environments which lack a ton of food. So 1 Spinosaurus per 100 varieties of pray, dead or alive, any class of dinosaur, and fish (fish provide excellent sources of good fat), the thing is gonna live happily ever after, lonely, maybe meeting once every 3 years to mate with another rare female.

Same goes for Tyrannosaurus. Tarbosaurus bataar, however, I would give a light down since it lived way up north. Back then the world was far warmer than it is today, but Tarbosaurus probably did deal with winter. Tyrannosaurus probably did too. Maybe they shed the feathers during the summer, etc.
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:iconthearchosaurqueen:
TheArchosaurQueen Featured By Owner Dec 8, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
All very good points I must say, and I do know what you mean by the "over feathering" going on :p.

So they may of had fuzzy chicks/cubs, but the adults could of lost a good 95% or even 99% of their integument do to their size. But like whales still retaining back leg bones and a tiny bit of hair, I think even the super Spinosaurus could of had a bit of integument. Maybe on the arms or around the face, in-case of sand storms like Ostrich's "eye-lashes".
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:iconemperordinobot:
EmperorDinobot Featured By Owner Dec 9, 2012
Oh yeah, this thing totally had eyelashes. Someday I'mma do a bust and put some sweet purple eyelashes. The bust is gonna be that of Norah Giggles, Hollywood Housewife.
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(1 Reply)
:iconkairu-hakubi:
Kairu-Hakubi Featured By Owner Dec 2, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
pretty badass. the scutes are an interesting look, though they have the unfortunate side-effect of making the rest of him look flat and puny by comparison.. but them's the breaks.
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:iconmexicanzilla:
mexicanzilla Featured By Owner Dec 2, 2012  Hobbyist Artist
Holy shit!
Its so menacing, and big, and so dinosaurid!
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:iconemperordinobot:
EmperorDinobot Featured By Owner Dec 6, 2012
all dinosaurs are dinosaurid.
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:iconrajaharimau98:
RajaHarimau98 Featured By Owner Dec 2, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Love how you made it look more like a bison's hump.
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:iconmaxterandkiwiking:
MaxterandKiwiKing Featured By Owner Dec 2, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
You said dead sauropods twice. XD
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:iconemperordinobot:
EmperorDinobot Featured By Owner Dec 2, 2012
Was drunk. SUE ME!!!
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:iconmaxterandkiwiking:
MaxterandKiwiKing Featured By Owner Dec 2, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Lol.Sorry man.
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:icontheonetruesircharles:
TheOneTrueSirCharles Featured By Owner Dec 2, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Awesome!
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:iconemperordinobot:
EmperorDinobot Featured By Owner Dec 2, 2012
Thank you. Tell me about yourself now boyo. Who are you? For someone to have stood up to my foul language, you must be quite the guy. Tell me about yourself and why you admire dinosauria.
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:icontheonetruesircharles:
TheOneTrueSirCharles Featured By Owner Dec 2, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Well I'm a DSP at a school who help takes care of mentally challenged children, next Febuary I'll be working there for 5 years.
I was born May 2nd 1988, I was raised by my dearly departed grandmother she is now home with our Heavenly Father. (Yes I am a Christian) :)

She got me into dinosaurs at a very loung age even before I started school.
She later bought me Jurassic Park which really hooked me into dinosaurs even more.
I always hated Barney...lol

When I started Kindergarten one day our teacher wanted us to draw a dinosaur which I think was a brachiosaurus, I was the only student who did not draw the legs like a bunch of pegs, instead I drew how it looked drawing the legs behind the sauropod as if it was walking.
The teacher was so impressed she called my mom and said my art skills surpassed any Kindergarden student and was more in par with 5th graders, and so started my paleoart work.
I think I still have that drawing if so I may submit it here on Deviantart.
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:iconemperordinobot:
EmperorDinobot Featured By Owner Dec 4, 2012
How cute!
I'm a Christian too, but I'm also a notorious bad boy.
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:icontheonetruesircharles:
TheOneTrueSirCharles Featured By Owner Dec 4, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Arn't we all bad in some way or another bro? Hahaha!

I may play Pokemon and even use Raichu in one of my teams but cute is not in my programming. lol
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:iconemperordinobot:
EmperorDinobot Featured By Owner Dec 5, 2012
I train cute pokemon...
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:icontheonetruesircharles:
TheOneTrueSirCharles Featured By Owner Dec 5, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Well I do have to train some cute pokemon such as Charmander but it eventually evolves into Charmeleon and then Charizard or Psyduck to Golduck.
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:iconharley-1979:
Harley-1979 Featured By Owner Dec 2, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
That's an interesting take on the spines on it's back
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:iconemperordinobot:
EmperorDinobot Featured By Owner Dec 2, 2012
Think of it as a giant scaly crocodile punk who takes your shit without asking.
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:iconharley-1979:
Harley-1979 Featured By Owner Dec 2, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
lol, that's brilliant
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:iconemperordinobot:
EmperorDinobot Featured By Owner Dec 2, 2012
Remember horner's Tyrannosaur as being one of those big vultures that scare off others and take dead prey? Tyrannosaurus was a hunter. Spinosaurus was one of those 'oh my there's dead fish and dead sauropods for me to have' type dudes. The world was his buffet. Sure he hunted, but it was more of an opportunist. Like crocodiles. Crocs are opportunists. Land in their territory and they will activate to hunt. If hunt is unsuccessful, there's more fish in the sea.
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:iconharley-1979:
Harley-1979 Featured By Owner Dec 2, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Yeah, Jurassic Park kinda' missed the boat on that one
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:iconemperordinobot:
EmperorDinobot Featured By Owner Dec 4, 2012
Who knows.
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