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Revisiting T. Rex (2016 Edition) by Durbed Revisiting T. Rex (2016 Edition) by Durbed
And more concretely FMNH PR 2081, also known as "Sue".

In the light of recent discoveries I thought it was a good moment to update again my Tyrant lizard, specially in regards to its integument. The feather coat is more extensive than the older versions (but less than Yutyrannus, as it seems natural) and also differently arranged. Something that doesn´t convince me about some feathered Tyrannosaurus depictions I´ve seen around (including my own) is how the feathers look almost uniformly long and thick all along the body, and the transition between those and the scaly or naked skin seem too abrupt, giving some sense of artificiality. I felt like some kind of layered, messy (following the example of some ratite birds) and different sized feather arrangement that progressively becomes more sparse until it vanishes in the underside of the body could work better, and help to make the feathers look more realistic and integrated into the animals body. Lets hope it could also help someone to become more accepting of this -once thought- wild and unlikely concept of fuzzy big theropods...

Edited: pictured updated after more recent and rigorous studies and skeletal drawings. Before you ask, yes, it is mildly inspired by Saurian's Tyrannosaurus.
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:iconchristina1969:
christina1969 Featured By Owner Edited Aug 4, 2016
The feet are oversized here. It's a good thing that you reduced the leg length, but you did it without reducing the size of the feet, which is incorrect. You can check that the size of the feet are smaller in this version: img13.deviantart.net/92b4/i/20… than in this version: 1.bp.blogspot.com/-9EXibr4W1Ig… and in your version.
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:iconmark0731:
mark0731 Featured By Owner Edited Jul 25, 2016
Nice update overall, reducing the leg length and making the neck and the tail at the beginning thicker are the most important and best updates, but why did you make the front of the skull rounder? You can see here that it is squarer than that: 3.bp.blogspot.com/-PgIFCmrN1CY… I would also ask Scott Hartman about the small horns above the eyes, and why did you make the skin smoother?
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:iconkirkseven:
kirkseven Featured By Owner Jul 10, 2016
shouldn't the teeth be showing?
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:icondurbed:
Durbed Featured By Owner Edited Jul 11, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
The current consensus is that all dinosaurs had lips covering their teeth to protect the enamel from drying out, except maybe water dweling dinosaurs like spinosaurids whose teeth would have been wet most of the time.
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:iconkirkseven:
kirkseven Featured By Owner Jul 11, 2016
makes sense.
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:iconjokercarnage5:
JokerCarnage5 Featured By Owner Jul 4, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
Awesome. :D
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:iconxstreamchaosofficial:
XStreamChaosOfficial Featured By Owner Jul 3, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
not too bad but feels like the skull is too flat on the side :P
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:iconmark0731:
mark0731 Featured By Owner Edited Jun 24, 2016
I think christina1969 is right, by looking at your picture I think it's based on the 2011 skeletal of Scott Hartman (because of the long legs), I think you should update it based on the 2013 skeletal. Calibersoul2012 is also right, your work doesn't exactly follows neither this one:  s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/7… nor this one: img13.deviantart.net/92b4/i/20…
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:icondurbed:
Durbed Featured By Owner Jun 26, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Oh, it's getting a huge update soon, not only regarding the legs but also textures, mass and feather distribution based on the most up to date science.
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:iconchristina1969:
christina1969 Featured By Owner May 14, 2016
I think it would need an update based on the 2013 skeletal of Scott Hartman.
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:iconcalibersoul2012:
Calibersoul2012 Featured By Owner Aug 3, 2015
The neck is noticeably too thin. The neck should be very thick a muscular to hoist is very robust, compacted skull.

The tarsal should also be more muscular.

Finally, the base of its tail should be thicker.




Other than the flaws, it is pretty nice.
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:icondurbed:
Durbed Featured By Owner Aug 6, 2015  Hobbyist Digital Artist
What is your reference?
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:iconmark0731:
mark0731 Featured By Owner Edited Jul 6, 2015
The skull shape seems a bit off (a bit triangle shaped), but still a good work.
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:icondurbed:
Durbed Featured By Owner Edited Jul 6, 2015  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Maybe the bulgy pouch gives that impression but the skull is traced directly over Scott Hartman's reconstruction of Sue, so I doubt it.
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:iconmark0731:
mark0731 Featured By Owner Jul 7, 2015
The back of the skull looks like doesn't reach the end of the lower jaw behind the eye like eg. Giganotosaurus, but if I'm not wrong, the back of Sue's skull behind the eye is reach the end of the lower jaw. 
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:icondurbed:
Durbed Featured By Owner Jul 12, 2015  Hobbyist Digital Artist
It does reach the end of the jaw, you must be confused because of the feathers covering the postorbital region and hiding the jawline and earholes.
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:iconvalen123456:
Valen123456 Featured By Owner Jun 28, 2015
There is this tendency people have on many concepts that something has to be either/or when it comes to certain features (possibly because its just so much simpler to think that way). Its like the whole predator vs scavenger argument for the T.Rex, its most likely it was a combination of both (even changing at different times of the year or in different life stages) like most modern carnivores, and yet people try and lump the creature into one side of one argument mostly by just shouting loudly.

My personal thoughts regarding feathered Tyrannosaurs is that infants/juveniles were fully feathered and the coverage reduced steadily as their size increased (assuming they were mostly for insulation). It is also possible that feathers were more for display in adulthood, if they had a breeding season then they could have grown a display coat of feathers then shed them when they no longer needed them. (Deer effectively grow the equivalent of  two whole limbs in antlers every year, so a new feather coat is easy by comparison).

It equally likely that one species/genus evolved one strategy and others "feathered" in different ways for different reasons. Until we find more evidence (which is never certain) all we can do is speculate, but hopefully with some wider ideas than the simple either/or arguments that prevailed in the past.  
 
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:iconterizinosaurus:
Terizinosaurus Featured By Owner Jun 19, 2015
IT IS GOOD!!!:) :)  :)
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:iconanonymousllama428:
AnonymousLlama428 Featured By Owner Apr 17, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
Cool! It still has the potential to scare!
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:iconprimalk:
Primalk Featured By Owner Feb 16, 2015  Student Traditional Artist
Finally! Someone who reconstructed their feather-scale mix with the feathers slowly progressing into the scales and no "sharp boundaries." Beautiful work!!!!!!!
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:iconchojinryu750:
ChojinRyu750 Featured By Owner Oct 21, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
excellent
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:iconarvalis:
arvalis Featured By Owner May 9, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
look what i found on ebay [link] I thought you might be interested
Reply
:icondurbed:
Durbed Featured By Owner May 21, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Woah! thanks for letting me now.
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:iconsameerprehistorica:
SameerPrehistorica Featured By Owner Sep 1, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Nicely done
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:iconeriorguez:
Eriorguez Featured By Owner Apr 19, 2012
BTW, didn't mention it; this is for Tyrannosaurus what this ([link]) is for Allosaurus. One of my favourite reconstructions of the animal, if not the best I've seen.
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:icondurbed:
Durbed Featured By Owner Apr 22, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
That´s a big compliment. Thanks man.
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:icontarturus:
Tarturus Featured By Owner Apr 16, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I like the feathery look. ^^
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:icondurbed:
Durbed Featured By Owner Apr 22, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thanks :)
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:iconsabertoothedcatsfan:
SaberToothedCatsFan Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2012  Student
This is the most accurate tyrannosaurus picture i have ever seen!
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:icondurbed:
Durbed Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thanks for that. :)
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:iconpulsinglights:
PulsingLights Featured By Owner Apr 13, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Love it! :meow:
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:icondurbed:
Durbed Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thank you!
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:iconarvalis:
arvalis Featured By Owner Apr 13, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
From my understanding, the idea that large theropods did not develop feathers, at least at maturity was because they didnt need the insulation. The larger animals get, the better they are regulating body temperature. All of the largest land animals today have very little fur if at all. The discovery of the yutyrannus is very exciting, but i wouldnt be so gung ho about jumping on the feathery theropod train. I could see a rex easily sporting sort of bristly feathers here and there perhaps like an elephant with its hair. We certainly do live in an exciting time for dinosaurs, though for the time being, i still like my rexes big and scaley.
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:iconjohnfaa:
JohnFaa Featured By Owner Apr 15, 2012  Student Writer
Tyrannosaurs had a much larger surface area than any mammal. This, combined with the absent of brown fat, would have required feathers.
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:icondurbed:
Durbed Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Erior already pointed it out, but yes, mammalian fur is not a very good analogy. Feathers are not a "burden" in large animals since they provide insulation, help to keep the cold, display rituals and you can´t overheat with them (birds only suffer overheating under really extreme conditions). What we should ask to ourselves is: why would T.Rex NOT have feathers ? ;)
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:iconvahzah-dovahkiin:
Vahzah-Dovahkiin Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2014  Hobbyist Photographer
This is late but THANK YOU. Not enough people bring up the point that feathers aren't just for keeping warm, but also for cooling down.
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:iconeriorguez:
Eriorguez Featured By Owner Apr 13, 2012
Giraffes are hairy, and are the same weight as a black rhino. "Pachyderms" are built like bricks, and make bad models when compared to dinosaurs. The extinct Sivatherium was white rhino sized and more compact than a giraffe, and it is never reconstructed as naked. Giant ground slots were elephant sized and lived in tropical areas, yet they are reconstructed with LONG hair (Xenarthans, however, have lower metabolic rates than other mammals. But, dinosaurs seem to have had also less wasteful metabolisms than mammals, and thus less heat generation). Tyrannosaurus, meanwhile, had a range that ventured into Alaska. So bad logic.

Plus, seeing its ancestors were feathered in their backs, Tyrannosaurus, if featherless there, would have naked skin.
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:iconkuwaizair:
Kuwaizair Featured By Owner Apr 12, 2012
I know. It's going to be a little hard. How long untill someone will draw some of them with cockatoo crests? :)
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:icondurbed:
Durbed Featured By Owner Apr 12, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Not too long, I hope! :)

But seriously, that would be going too far. The kind of feathers tyrannosauroids had were very primitive and hair-like, different to those of flying birds.
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:iconkuwaizair:
Kuwaizair Featured By Owner Apr 12, 2012
like the fuzz hatchlings have?
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:icondurbed:
Durbed Featured By Owner Apr 12, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yeah, or the kind of feathers a cassowary has [link] but nothing more structurally complex than that. Seems like "modern" feathers with barbules evolved only within maniraptorans and more specifically avimerigians, the most birdlike dinosaurs like Velociraptor and birds themselves.
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:iconkuwaizair:
Kuwaizair Featured By Owner Apr 12, 2012
link dosen't work. is there one of those microscope photos of their feathers?
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:icondurbed:
Durbed Featured By Owner Apr 12, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
No, it was a cassowary. Nevermind. :)
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:icontomozaurus:
Tomozaurus Featured By Owner Apr 11, 2012  Student General Artist
It came out very nicely!
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:icondurbed:
Durbed Featured By Owner Apr 12, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Glad you like it. :)
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:icondino-mario:
Dino-Mario Featured By Owner Apr 11, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
I LOVE his feathers.I will upload a feathered T-Rex later
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:icondurbed:
Durbed Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thanks! Yay, we need as fuzzy Tyrannosaurs as possible
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:iconzimices:
Zimices Featured By Owner Apr 11, 2012  Hobbyist
El plumaje ha quedado muy bien, muy interesante además el razonamiento sobre el largo del plumaje, definitivamente así queda más natural. Mi única duda son los brazos, tal vez sea por la cobertura plumosa, pero me parece que deberían ser más gruesos, no?
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:icondurbed:
Durbed Featured By Owner Apr 12, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Puede que tambien sea por el shading en la parte anterior del brazo que lo hace parecer más delgado, aparte de las plumas que no son tan largas como parecen. No te falta razón, creo que voy a intentar corregir eso, y luego lo actualizaré. :)
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