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Mortal techniques II: Velociraptor by Durbed Mortal techniques II: Velociraptor by Durbed
Velociraptor mongoliensis "mantling" over a young oviraptorosaur. Extant raptors use their wings in a similar way to hide their prey from nearby predators, so it seems plausible that their mesozoic cousins had the same habit.
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:iconsaberrex:
Saberrex Featured By Owner Aug 23, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Wonderfully accurate.
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:iconanimegurl02:
ANIMEGURL02 Featured By Owner Jan 7, 2017
actually no, velociraptors only had feathers on their arms
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:iconsaberrex:
Saberrex Featured By Owner Jan 8, 2017  Hobbyist General Artist
Why would Velociraptors only have feathers on their arms if their close relatives like Sinornithosaurus, Dakotaraptor and Microraptor were also found to be fully feathered? That makes no sense. 
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:iconanimegurl02:
ANIMEGURL02 Featured By Owner Jan 8, 2017

Turner and colleagues interpreted the presence of feathers on Velociraptor as evidence against the idea that the larger, flightless maniraptorans lost their feathers secondarily due to larger body size. Furthermore, they noted that quill knobs are almost never found in flightless bird species today, and that their presence in Velociraptor (presumed to have been flightless due to its relatively large size and short forelimbs) is evidence that the ancestors of dromaeosaurids could fly, making Velociraptor and other large members of this family secondarily flightless, though it is possible the large wing feathers inferred in the ancestors of Velociraptor had a purpose other than flight. The feathers of the flightless Velociraptor may have been used for display, for covering their nests while brooding, or for added speed and thrust when running up inclined slopes.

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:iconsaberrex:
Saberrex Featured By Owner Jan 8, 2017  Hobbyist General Artist
Yes they did serve other purposes, but saying it only had feathers on its arms makes no sense. A dromaeosaurid such as Velociraptor would likely have needed full coverings feathers for many reasons, one of which is likely heat regulation; small dromaeosaurs for example would lose needed body heat quickly if cold, and at the same time, their bodies would be vulnerable to direct heat and they could very well die if exposed in extreme environment. As such, feathers provide a way of keeping warm, cooling off, and shielding them from direct heat. Moreover cladistic analysis and phylogenetic bracketing indicates that all dromaeosaurids even up to the largest ones would have had full body coverings of feathers. Yes, Velociraptor probably did have flying ancestor, but it, like flightless birds, was not likely to lose such a feature as feathers even after millions of years of evolution.  
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:iconanimegurl02:
ANIMEGURL02 Featured By Owner Edited Jan 9, 2017
''Moreover cladistic analysis and phylogenetic bracketing indicates that all dromaeosaurids even up to the largest ones would have had full body coverings of feathers.''
where did u learn this? also, it did
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:iconsaberrex:
Saberrex Featured By Owner Jan 9, 2017  Hobbyist General Artist
"It did." That's not really an argument. And what evidence do you have in regards to Velociraptor not having a full covering of feathers similar to its close avian relatives? Where's your evidence? Advanced maniraptorans such as Oviraptorosaurs, Troodontids, Therizinosaurids and even non-maniraptoran theropods and ornithischians such as Ornithomimids, Tyrannosauroids as big as Yutyrannus, and the small plant eaters Kulindadromeus and Tianyulong have feathers over all of or most of their body.   

Among other places where I learned the evidence I presented, was in the paper describing the dromaeosaurid Zhenyuanlong suni (slightly smaller than Velociraptor), which was fully feathered as the fossil clearly shows: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/artic… . This creature was completely flightless, and yet it still had feathers all over its body, including what appears to be a tail fan. Dakotaraptor too shows evidence of feathers in the form of quill knobs. Admitted, that is indirect evidence, but as modern flightless birds are feathered and do not possess quill knobs, it presents what is essentially clear and established; dromaeosaurids were fully feathered. 
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:iconanimegurl02:
ANIMEGURL02 Featured By Owner Jan 9, 2017
what im saying is, ''yes'' it did have flying ancestors. also, im not arguing. ''And what evidence do you have in regards to Velociraptor not having a full covering of feathers similar to its close avian relatives? Where's your evidence?'' i wasnt saying it did.
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(1 Reply)
:iconpilsator:
pilsator Featured By Owner Jan 14, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Epic.
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:icondurbed:
Durbed Featured By Owner Jan 17, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
And coming from you that means something. ;)
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:iconk-e-t-t-y:
K-e-t-t-y Featured By Owner Jan 14, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Amazing!
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:icontomozaurus:
Tomozaurus Featured By Owner Jan 13, 2012  Student General Artist
Top-notch as always mate.
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:icondurbed:
Durbed Featured By Owner Jan 14, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thanks man ;)
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:iconiltassista:
ilTassista Featured By Owner Jan 13, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
neat!
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:iconeliphaleth:
Eliphaleth Featured By Owner Jan 13, 2012
I love your work.
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:icondurbed:
Durbed Featured By Owner Jan 14, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thanks!
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