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:icondualmask:Dualmask posted a status
Digital artists... To what size do you usually set your canvas when starting a new image?

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:iconhulkdaddyg:
hulkdaddyg Featured By Owner Jun 9, 2017  Professional General Artist
11x17 canvas 300 dpi sometimes 600 dpi for more detailed pieces.
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:icondualmask:
Dualmask Featured By Owner Jun 9, 2017  Professional Digital Artist
You know dpi doesn't really matter if you're not printing the work? A 3000px image at 96dpi will visually look no different than a 3000px image at 600 dpi on screen, but the file size will be different.
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:iconhulkdaddyg:
hulkdaddyg Featured By Owner Jun 9, 2017  Professional General Artist
True. Early on I used to print a lot of my work out and I also may go back to doing that for inking some physical pieces, so I'm going to stick with my habit.
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:icondualmask:
Dualmask Featured By Owner Jun 10, 2017  Professional Digital Artist
Yeah, I probably won't change either, at least not for the art book drawings I'm doing and commissions, but it all has me thinking what we think we know about image resolutions might be wrong. Habitually setting everything to 300-600dpi may be putting more strain on memory (and thus the speed at which images can be produced in software) than need be.
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:iconlamontrobinsonart:
lamontrobinsonart Featured By Owner Jun 8, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Posters: 3300x5100px (for 11"x17" posters at 300dpi).  I'd like to work at 600dpi, but my computer can't handle it at that size.
Manga Pages: 3375x5250px (comes out to 5.625"x8.75" at 600dpi).  That's specifically for the Createspace template for a 5.5"x8.5" book, the closest stock size they have to a manga book.
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:icondualmask:
Dualmask Featured By Owner Jun 9, 2017  Professional Digital Artist
I see, so your method is similar to what I currently do. I was worried about confusing dpi with ppi and possibly overdoing it with image sizes... Or under-doing it, since the subject is so confusing... But I'm probably worrying for nothing.
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:iconwbd:
wbd Featured By Owner Jun 7, 2017  Hobbyist General Artist
Admittedly, a lot depends on what I'm drawing, but here are a few guidelines. When I'm making a "fake" screenshot, I make a 3840 x 2160 canvas (1920 x 1080 doubled). I watched some videos showing how actual anime series are made, and they tend to double the resolution like that, and they use aliased colors and inks for in-progress pics (some companies are different, of course). This is also good for wallpaper shots, or just anything that will fill the screen in general. I held a poll a while back, and by far the most common resolution was 1920x1080 ( wbd.deviantart.com/journal/pol… ) .

When I want to draw a taller image (like a full-body shot), I think 3000 px tall is about the minimum. 4000 is more comfortable, 5000px even moreso, but they are a hassle to work a background in. The paintbrushes just get so much slower, and there's a lot of temptation to put in details that won't be seen when the image is reduced for viewing on reasonable screen resoluitions. For taller images, I need to start thinking about aspect ratios for phones- I haven't done that enough. I tend to go with golden ratio when I do.

The final one are my fake PC-98 screenshots- I just double 640 x 400 (1280 x 800), or work at 640 x 400 and zoom in depending on what I'm trying to do.
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:icondualmask:
Dualmask Featured By Owner Jun 7, 2017  Professional Digital Artist
I've been thinking about resolution choices, and have been wondering (read: feeling insecure) about whether I'm making the right size and dimension choices with my own works. Nowadays, the work I've been doing (mainly my RPBs) have been 3850x4900, or what Clip Studio Paint says is 11x14" at 350 dpi. I guess it's okay, but I'm never quite sure, and I'm not sure if changing anything will have a positive effect at all. I'm always thinking about print, so I tend to focus more on inches than on pixels, but I think I need to make different considerations.

I looked into the Golden Ratio, and I'm afraid that even after reading about it, I'm not sure how to apply it.

The idea of working with aliased tools and then scaling down a larger image is a good one though, something I should consider.
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:iconwbd:
wbd Featured By Owner Jun 7, 2017  Hobbyist General Artist
You bring up an important point- print is an entirely different concern. I mainly focus on screen display, but I found that the Clip Studio Paint website had a good tutorial on manga-style/comic work for print:

www.clipstudio.net/en/howto/hi…

It's a good and fairly complete walk-through, but I will admit that some of it is difficult to follow. I made up a template based on the description given, and I also made a few brushes based on it. The aliased tools come in handy for print, as they can prevent a lot of the feathering or weird softness that anti-aliasing sometimes creates when printed out.

As for the Golden Ratio, I don't use it in too complicated a fashion. As an example- if I'm not working on a fixed resolution (like 1920x1080 or something), and I remember to do it- let's say my picture is 3000px tall. The ratio should be 1.618, so I divide 3000 by it and get 1854px wide. Theoretically that's a pleasing aspect ratio. I really have no idea, but it can't be all bad. If nothing else, it prevents me from making a picture too thin (which happens when I want to save time on drawing the background).
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:icondualmask:
Dualmask Featured By Owner Jun 8, 2017  Professional Digital Artist
Ah, that helps a ton. I'm coming up to the end of my art book project, so I'm thinking I will experiment with canvas sizes for the last few I do. Thanks for the info!
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