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Ixalerpeton

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I was really thrilled when this critter was published, as it wasn't really possible to nail down the proportions of any lagerpetid before this. Obviously I wish there was more information about the hands and the snout, but seriously, this was an amazing addition to our knowledge of what Triassic near-dinosaurs looked like.

Also, this truly looks like an animal that could have bounded around on all fours just about as easily as it could move bipedally (remember that when moving quadrupedally it probably would have lowered the ankle and moved with the hindlimb in a for plantigrade posture). From critters pretty much like this we get both the bipedal marasuchus-like dinosauromorphs, and apparently more quadrupedal silesaurids.

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Comments27
anonymous's avatar
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Owlbaskingshark's avatar
would it be alright if I used your skeletals as references? I'll always put a link to your profile
DrScottHartman's avatar
For life reconstructions? Absolutely.
Owlbaskingshark's avatar
thanks, I made an acrocanthosaurus and an allosaurus.
Atlantis536's avatar
It looks like Eoraptor to me.
DrScottHartman's avatar
Eoraptor has a dinosaur pelvis and feet (and quite different proportions all around), but in some ways they aren't too far apart, so I guess that's not real surprising.
Atlantis536's avatar
Also the pose of the Eoraptor skeleton you did before is similar.
CommonHouseGecko's avatar
" so I guess that's not real surprising"
From its pose it's obvious that the Ixalerpeton does not agree with you.
PedroSalas's avatar
That rounded structure on the dorsal and proximal part of the tibia makes me feel it could have thicker calves than those represented here...or am I saying nonsense?
DrScottHartman's avatar
The cnemial crest is pretty small, so the anterior head of the calves would be small for sure. The origin of the other calf muscle heads is actually on the posterior end of the femur, not the tibia.
PedroSalas's avatar
Ah, ok.
And those curved and powerful femurs, are they an adaptation for speed?
DrScottHartman's avatar
In a sense - the curve is related to the stance (a more flex-limbed stance) and is a response to how forces are transmitted in such a stance. Of course there are faster and slower animals with similar stances based on proportions and muscling (a schnauzer vs a greyhound, for example), but generally speaking animals with flexed limbs are faster than graviportal animals (e.g. elephants) when all else is held equal.
PedroSalas's avatar
I see, it's always a pleasure learning from you. Thanks!
Mindslave24-7's avatar
CMIPalaeo's avatar
Wow, these guys had bigger heads than I thought. Do we have any evidence that other lagerpetids had noggins this large, or is this the only one we can tell on?
DrScottHartman's avatar
This is the only consequential skull material for a lagerpetid. 
CMIPalaeo's avatar
Very interesting!
Hyrotrioskjan's avatar
Fascinating feet! What a nice little weirdo ^^
DrawingDinosaurs's avatar
Ooh, that was quick! I'm assuming the unusual toe pattern (reduced digit II, digit IV longer than III) is based on Lagerpeton?
DrScottHartman's avatar
You are correct. Since Lagerpeton is the only (published) lagerpetid with a known foot, it was the only reasonable choice to fill in the missing pes.
AimForrest's avatar
It is actually super cute >v<
Dontknowwhattodraw94's avatar
That's a reallly interesting little toe he has there. 
anonymous's avatar
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