Deviation Actions

DrScottHartman's avatar

African Brachiosaur

184 Favourites
94 Comments
18K Views
Giraffatitan. I know some of you don't like the name, but it's clearly "winning" so you may as well get used to it. This is the classic African brachiosaur that is mounted in Berlin. It's also freakin' huge.

Edit (6/2013): Reposed and made some fairly major changes to the silhouette. The skeleton itself was fine.
Image details
Image size
4465x3030px 1.57 MB
Published:
© 2009 - 2021 DrScottHartman
Comments95
anonymous's avatar
Join the community to add your comment. Already a deviant? Log In
WesO05's avatar
Regardless if it’s the Brachiosaurus we all know and love or not, it’s still a beautiful animal
joshuaACnewman's avatar
While I have a degree of suspicion about the S-curve necks, doesn't it seem like this suspension bridge style puts the center of gravity way forward with such a short tail? Like the Isisaurus looks to have had a really horizontal neck, but it also probably had a long, beefy tail to balance it.
DrScottHartman's avatar
It's an interesting question, but I don't think so. The neck is not as dense as the body, and far less dense than the hindlimbs and tail. Estimates for the specific gravity of the neck generally varies from .6-.7 (I'd personally end up on the high side of that, because of the nuchal ligaments), the torso .7-.85, while the tail, pelvis, and limbs should all be right around 1.0. In all probability the pelvic region + tail would have massed about the same as the neck, and the tail is sticking out more or less straight, which shifts the center of gravity further aft.

Also, FWIW I don't agree that Isisaurus had a horizontal neck, the vertebral column angle looks pretty much like other titanosaurs to me. It appears that only diplodocids has truly horizontal necks, though basal sauropods probably held their necks at angles somewhere in between.  Shunosaurus, a primitive club-tailed sauropod by ScottHartman  
paleosir's avatar
at first, I didn't really like Giraffatitan or Brachiosaurus, but now I'm drawing it I start to like it more, your skeletal also helped (I somehow find this more straight neck posture better suited for the animal than that strong S-curve)
DrScottHartman's avatar
Thanks - I also agree (to my own surprise) that the less S-curved necks have a grace and weight to them that many older reconstructions lack, though of course that wouldn't be a reason to change them if it weren't also for the way the neck vertebrae go together.
paleosir's avatar
nah, thank you for making the skeletal!
Yes, I don't know why, but let's just #thickenthenecks
bricksmashtv's avatar
Scott have you seen Nima's new Giraffatitan skeletal? It's beautiful, and it's multiview: paleo-king.deviantart.com/art/…
DrScottHartman's avatar
I had seen, yes. I don't agree with several of Nima's interpretations, but it's very nicely executed.
SpinoInWonderland's avatar
Is this one scaled to the size of the Berlin specimen HMN SII or an adult specimen such as HMN XV2?

Because when I compare it to your Brachiosaurus(not the one from your "Thunder Lizards" size comparison, but the standalone skeletal, which has an axial length of ~23.7 meters give or take last time I measured, it's probably scaled to the size of the holotype specimen FMNH P 25107, correct me if I'm wrong), this Giraffatitan ends up somewhat larger.

The Berlin Giraffatitan has been estimated at roughly around ~22-23 meters. This one seems to be quite a bit larger than that.
DrScottHartman's avatar
It's HMN SII. I believe the classic 22-23 meter long estimate is based off of Janensch's publications, which measured the modelled skeleton, not the actual vertebrae.
SpinoInWonderland's avatar
Oh. I thought that this one was HMN XV2 because it ended up quite a bit larger than your Brachiosaurus, to the point where the torso of this Giraffatitan even ended up longer, despite Brachiosaurus having a proportionally longer torso.

This Giraffatitan ended up roughly around ~25.3 meters long.
DrScottHartman's avatar
Oh, in that case maybe you are correct - I'll have to double check when I get a chance.
Turtleosaurus's avatar
I was curious about Gregory Paul describing Giraffatitan as having "withers" and I was wondering about it. Do you think this would benefit it, aiding in a vertical neck posture, as Brachiosaurus appears to lack these so called "withers" so could it mean that the species had different neck postures. Thanks
Kaijukid23's avatar
Is that tiny tail really can support balance?
DrScottHartman's avatar
The obvious answer is "yes", since the animal clearly existed. But it's a misnomer that sauropods needed long tails to balance out their necks - only diplodocids seem to grow such truly gigantic tails, and in macronarians there doesn't seem to be any connection between neck and tail length.
Kaijukid23's avatar
Well, I know truly that my question has been proven millions of years ago, just wonder if they would collapse face-first to the ground
DrScottHartman's avatar
Quadrupeds don't need counterbalances. Big-headed buffalo don't have larger tails than deer for example.
Dinodc98's avatar
dude i have to give you most of the credit for my art they realy help me to reconstruct these amazing animals  thanks scott i think i speak for all paleoartists when i say we would be lost without you
DrScottHartman's avatar
You're welcome. I wish I had more time to dedicate to it, but it's certainly a rewarding process (not always "fun", but definitely rewarding).
Dinodc98's avatar
I know what you mean for some reason you just have to do it
PedroSalas's avatar
mark0731's avatar
How m long thin Giraffatitan?
Fragillimus335's avatar
I actually like the name, but Brachiosaurus branci was a killer combination...
anonymous's avatar
Join the community to add your comment. Already a deviant? Log In