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About Literature / Professional Senior Member doughboycafeSpain Groups :iconthewrittenrevolution: theWrittenRevolution
The words are the spark.
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Core Member 'til Hell freezes over
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Scared: A Guide to Writing Horror :icondoughboycafe:doughboycafe 80 50
Literature
Consuela's Journey
Conseula had married Antonio in the end of 1936, but that was neither the beginning of the story, nor the end. The war had started then, too, but it was a far off and distant thing she heard of from the local barber, or saw in a headline. There were armies out there somewhere. Antonio went away to drive them supplies from time to time, but he didn't bring the war back with him. All told, it took a few years to reach a place as remote as Reus.
Once it came it was like turning off a lightswitch; one day there was a house, there were paltry dishes, given by no one, that passed for china; there were bedspreads, there was a crib. The next day Consuela found herself on the street. The soldiers in green came sometime in '39 - the month she didn't exactly know, only that it was cold and damp. That's when they turned her out. Lights on, lights off. The snow would have been there, but it had been a particularly mild winter that far toward the coast. But with Katy just barely four at her side and
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:icondoughboycafe:doughboycafe 30 18
Literature
Sound Carries Near a Salt Flat
the noise of a dying man
is that of a humpack whale
reverberating across the desert thermocline,
tunneling between the dune
and the horizon.
he whines,
low, not loud, but it surrounds us;
ocean pressure straining
at the sides of a submerging ship.
the harpoon head of
the frag bomb burns in his leg -
flesh irreparably breached -
as that groaning
calls navigation signs
to some unknown counterpart far
across the sand.
I can swear to you
he will be gone in forty-eight hours from the sepsis
if medical can't make it to this fucking
shelled-out excuse for a town
by tomorrow evening. I give
a sedative
still, his cries carry
like those songs deep in the dark water that we hear
but will never understand;
some forgotten, desperate code
that isn't ours to know,
until we're dead.
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:icondoughboycafe:doughboycafe 23 25
Literature
Things Come Apart (Part 2)
    Everett picked up the morning paper after a long walk, and sat down on the bench just outside his hotel to read it. The front page headline was about a Sergeant that got beat to death up in Fort Totten. People were getting pretty anxious about soldiers these days, the article said. This was the tri-state area, not the front. He got a page and a half in before he got bored of reading. Instead he watched the people come and go from Pat’s Original Diner across the street, idly wishing he had a cigarette.
    The day was getting steadily warmer and a few daffodils had already unfolded their yellow petal hands and turned their trumpet faces up towards the sun. He was sure by this time in Chattanooga the narcissus and the redbuds would be almost past, and it would be good and warm. But then when he thought about it again, he wasn’t sure. It had been a long time since Chattanooga, and his memories were a little hazy.
   
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:icondoughboycafe:doughboycafe 3 9
Literature
Things Come Apart (Part 1)
In 1919 the bulk of the American Expeditionary Force that had been sent to fight in France returned to the United States via New York City in steady waves. At first the city welcomed them with open arms and ticker tape parades. But soon the city grew tired of soldiers and the late arrivals found no help in transition back to their ‘normal’ lives, or even a friendly smile. The world was moving on, and they were expected to, as well.
 
            “In New York City, we were broken up on the 12th, the soldiers from different states going to different barracks…
            …Several of us hired a cab and went to a hotel in Trenton and found they were not anxious to accommodate us. Quite a contrast from a year or two before. Human nature was taking its course, and the events of the past three years were had already been forgotten.”
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:icondoughboycafe:doughboycafe 4 2
Literature
Navy Property
“Those sons of bitches!”
Hank came into Hangar Six howling like a mad dog.
“Sons of bitches, they stole it!”
Ken looked up from the remains of the T34 engine he was working on. “You’re making a racket.”
“As well I should be!” bawled Hank.
“Who stole – “ Waldorff started, but Hank just kept right on going.
“The bastards stole it. This is all because of that damned idiot Kowalski and his grudge against us for the fireworks! This is open war, I’m telling you Ken!”
“You’re too loud,” said Ken. “Can’t hear myself think.”
“Well, I’m outraged, and you should be outraged!”
“Lower your voice and tell me why, I’ll consider it.” Ken rubbed his temple. Shop Super had had a long night the night before, and the vague smell of old alcohol oozing out of pores would be a reminder of it all day today.
Hank stamped a foot and point
:icondoughboycafe:doughboycafe
:icondoughboycafe:doughboycafe 10 22
Literature
IED
What a body looks like means nothing in the moment --
that sound, did the jeep backfire?
but louder,
then a crystal crinkle clatter of glass,
spat across the sand from the surprised mouth of the windshield.
The body is supposed to be familiar but
strangely alien in form,
and in touch,
when you're wrist deep inside of it
in a blind,
frantic
search for the shredded vein.
The body is not muscled,
not small, not tanned, not pale
not dark, not hairy, not
anything
but a precious, fleeting, fleshy thing,
pouring itself out upon the earth
culminating in one scarlet, incendiary moment.
One moment there is a person,
full of life and adjectives and
a smile you recognize --
he is laughing, mid breath,
to repeat the punchline of some joke, whites of his teeth showing.
And the next moment, there is a
body, glass impaled,
sand spattered,
joke forgotten.
:icondoughboycafe:doughboycafe
:icondoughboycafe:doughboycafe 24 35
Literature
The Experiment
Somehow, no one knew how, Hank had gotten a hold of a can of Gorilla Glue.
“Check this out,” Hank said. “Specs says it can lift 10 tons.”
“Bullshit,” said Ken.
“No, it really says that.”
“Yeah I believe it says that, but I say it’s bullshit.”
“Well how the hell are we gonna know? What do we even know of that weighs ten tons?”
They looked at each other, the way they did that made Waldorff excited, and a little uneasy.
“Salad,” bawled Hank. “Go get RJ. We need him.”
“What for?”
“You’ll see, just go get him.”
“But what should I tell him?” Waldorff was dubious. RJ didn’t come over for just any old thing.
“Tell him I said it’s important,” intoned Hank. Then he gave the hard eye, the one Waldorff had learned about in Rota last year, and Waldorff got while the gettin’ was good.
#
Fifteen minutes later they were out
:icondoughboycafe:doughboycafe
:icondoughboycafe:doughboycafe 7 22
Mature content
Worse Than The Vultures :icondoughboycafe:doughboycafe 9 28

DDs, Interviews, & More!





Interviews & Resources
Sometimes I talk about history or books and people record it.

Being Historical with doughboycafeHistory is cool. I could try to explain why, but if you aren't already interested, there's a better way to get on board: read and/or write historical fiction. Only...I can't say anything there, I don't know anything about historical fiction!
Luckily, dA has a strong cadre of historical fiction writers. I (metaphorically) sat down with one of the outstanding, doughboycafe:
What is "historical fiction"?

I think that it is, quite simply, fiction set somewhere in history. Though it usually draws on one or more actual events, we get to make up the whos and the whys and the hows.
That isn't to say it isn't accurate, however. Historical fiction, good historical fiction, is well researched and the details of the time period, social situation, and culture should reflect real ideas, technology, and cultural values. 

If you have to do the same amount of research, why not nonfiction?

I guess that all depends on your
A Publishing PrimerYou asked for it, so you got it!
Based on this poll, you, our community, want to know more about Publishing. We will be posting publishing opportunities around about every month, now, specifically for literary magazines. But what does that mean for a novice who has never submitted before?
Let me break it down for you.
There are tons of lit mags out there, journals, reviews, and small presses. Some are more reputable than others. So the first step is
Find Your Market

The market is the audience you are targeting, so you should have an idea of your genre (sci fi is great but what type? Hard, soft, etc?) and the demographic of your audience (young? old? between? all of the above?) But even if you get it narrowed down there can be a veritable mountain of places to submit to which can get confusing. There are a few great sites that compile markets and magazines into an easy to searc

A Guide to Writing Combat-Related Mental IllnessComing Back from Combat: A Writer’s Guide to Combat Related Psychological Illness in Fiction
The aim of this guide is simple: plenty of people want to write about war, to explore it, to understand it and understand soldiers they know who are in it or have come from it. But, often times putting the aftermath, the pain, and the psychological impact war has on the mind into words is difficult to do well.
This guide exists to help fiction writers accurately portray psychological disorders in their work, because the people who suffer from these disorders and their loved ones deserve honesty and do not deserve to be misrepresented. The guide is here to help writers understand how these disorders come about, how they are treated, and how to think critically about how they might impact the person who has them.
I. Introduction
1. A disclaimer, and polemics.
2. Why are you writing a psychological illness into your story?
3. Terms you should be familiar with for this
Scared: A Guide to Writing HorrorIndex:
    0. Intro by Horror Boss Memnalar
DBC’s History of Horror
Tellin’ you where all this scary came from
Key Element 1
DBC’s mini guide to liminality in spec fic
It’s all about thresholds, baby
Key Element 2
Fear Factory
Phases of Horror from 1764 to present
Key Element’s 3 & 4
Memnalar’s Guide to Writing the Scary
The best writing advice you can get
A Bibliography
Because we do those
Also a reading list
    As long as there have been people, there have been stories. As long as there have been stories, there have been scary stories. We are hard-wired to be scared, and to be fascinated by what scares us, by what we imagine lurks just beyond the firelight.
    As a genre, horror has a relatively short history. As a tradition, it is as old as we are. Today, Nobody and Nobody will give you a quick look at the history of horror and a few thoughts on horror writing. So gather close by th

When (Not) to Publish your ManuscriptNovel Writing Basics Week
You have reached the point where your novel is finally done. The last word is on the page, the last period is at the end of the final sentence. You did it.
So, now what?
For those that want to publish their work, finding a route to publishing seems like the next step, but often there are a lot of steps in between.
So whether you have been working on your novel for a long time, or just finished NaNoWriMo, there are a few things you need to ask yourself – and answer honestly – before you even take the first step towards publishing.
   
 1.       Is your draft complete?
Meaning, does it have a beginning, middle, and end? Is it an actually fully realized draft with rising action, climax, etc? Novice authors with no publishing record are almost never asked to send the first three chapters of a book to an agent and ‘just write the



The Historical Fiction Workshop
Just what it says on the tin.
Historical Fiction Workshop: Week 1, Prep WeekWelcome to the 2015 Historical Fiction Workshop!
 
Please read the following carefully, as instructions are here.
This year I have the pleasure of hosting alongside neurotype, former Lit CV and all around dA rockstar. We are both versed in literature and have been published before, and I personally have several degrees in history and history related fields, so you are going to be in good hands here.
Does that make us the be all and end all? Not by a long shot. But we have some chops, and we want you all to know that you'll be getting real instruction, and not random speculation. We're working hard to make this worth your time and energy.
What will happen from here on out?
Assignments will be posted weekly in a journal, like this one, so right now make sure you are watching me, even if it is temporary for the workshop.  I won’t be slighted if you unwatch at the end, this is for practicality’s sake only.
Once you have completed an ass
Historical Fiction Workshop: Week 2, Hi-StoryThe lessons actually begin. Let's do this :stare:
This week we will be talking about not how to write accurate history, but how to write a story. Just because you chose a genre to write in doesn't mean the story element is somehow less important than the background your chose. It still has to be literature.

Lesson 2: Building a HistFic story

First, let's talk about what Historical Fiction is. A lot of people seem to think that if something is historical fiction, that it needs to revolve around a specific historical event. It doesn't. In fact, the fiction part of the genre allows you to invent your own. But remember, this isn't AU (that´s a whole different genre!). We're going to take a real setting, with real facts, and build a story from it. If you want to use a real event, that's fine. But if you are interested in a time period or general area, that's also fine.
Historical Fiction is hard because it requires so much research. You need to work a lot, read a

Historical Fiction Workshop: Week 3, SourcesAlright, here we go. Everyone has their base ideas, now it’s time to dive into research. Everyone is excited. We all open up google, and…
Oh, god, it's TOO MUCH. There is information on everything, everywhere, and I can't tell what is useful or isn't, or where I should even start!
 No big. Let's roll with this week's lesson.
Lesson 3: Sources and Gathering
Now it’s time to start learning how to gather proper sources and how to sift out what is actually relevant to your story. Remember that this is NOT the only week you’re going to have for research, as researching is a continuous process during all story writing, but especially so in historical fiction.
 
Part 1: What you need, what you don't.
First thing is to look through your outlines and notes and start pulling out exactly what information you are going to need. Let’s look at my own example outline.
 
I am writing a story about American espio
Historical Fiction Workshop: Week 4+5, WritingAlright Historians, time to actually start writing your story.
(NOTE: if you have not completed week 3's sources and you are starting to panic, DON'T. You have time. you have time to read, you will have two whole weeks to write this AND week 6 is focused on re-researching and re-writing, so from here on all, reading sources and putting pen to paper is literally all you are doing. Be calm, and ask me if you are hitting road blocks.)
 
This time, your assignment first: Start your working draft. I’d like to see people get it half done by the end of the week. I assume that halfway through your stories you will start to find more things you need to research, so here is what I want you to do:
:bulletblue: Make a new scrap deviation, this will be your rough draft. Start writing it and link it back here so I know when to look at it. You can link even if you only have an opening paragraph and continue to add to it, alerting us as many times as you like

Historical Fiction Workshop: Week 7, RedactionTime for the final week, guys. Sorry I am a day late. What I need is links to your rough drafts posted on this journal so we can move forward.
This week is all about editing your rough draft, meaning, I want you to go back and start looking for clunky sentences, mistakes, etc. If you don't encounter any historical inaccuracies, good for you!
But if you do encounter one...
Ok so we’ve all gotten part way through our stories. And then stopped. Probably because several people hit a brick wall and realized they are either missing critical information or worse yet – they got something wrong.
    I.                     
First part of this week’s lesson is: Guys, you’re going to get a lot of things wrong. No amount of research is going to give you the 100% the first time through. This is history, this is the grind. So the f

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 Sup DA, how are you all doing? Working hard? Writing a lot?

I'm writing, but nothing I can post here. Thesis defense is almost upon me, I've got a manuscript of (literal) epic nature and proportions to deliver by the 15th of June. I think I missed the lit block party, which is pretty sad, but I hope y'all had a good time.

- I had to nuke my inbox because of the sheer quantity of notifications, but if there's something cool you wrote and are really proud of, link me here and let me know. Once this manuscript is in and defended, I'll be looking for things to read
- My life is consumed by my thesis so all other projects sadly got put on hold. But on the upside, anyone who wants to know anything about Beowulf, AMA, because that's my whole life until forever.
- for any of you interested in fantasy/liminalty/otherworldly beasties, I got a chance to meet up with a guy from Trinity who specializes in vampiriology (that is a real job, apparently). I can hit you up with some truly interesting notes about horror/cultural anxieties/beasties as signifiers.

Otherwise, cross your fingers and wish me luck!





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doughboycafe

Artist | Professional | Literature
Spain
"You spend all your time talking, not working. You're an expatriate, see? You hang around cafés."

Expatriated travel writer, former archaeologist, historian, translator, linguist. And profession hanger arounder of cafés.
Interests

What do you think is the single greatest achievment in all of western literature? 

60%
12 deviants said That serbian biology textbook with Nic Cage on the cover doesn't count.
40%
8 deviants said Answer in comments

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:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner Edited Nov 13, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
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:icondoughboycafe:
doughboycafe Featured By Owner Nov 13, 2018  Professional Writer
Hot damn cataluña is cool
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:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner Nov 13, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
Take me there
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:icondoughboycafe:
doughboycafe Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2018  Professional Writer
Bby pls
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:iconblackbowfin:
BlackBowfin Featured By Owner Sep 18, 2018   Writer
Hey you, DBC.  Hope you're awesoming it up on what I hopes is a very happy birthday.  :)
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:iconruitherga:
Ruitherga Featured By Owner Sep 18, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Happy birthday!
I hope you have an amazing day!
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:iconalphashitlord:
AlphaShitlord Featured By Owner Sep 18, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
   𝓗𝓪𝓹𝓹𝔂 𝓫𝓲𝓻𝓽𝓱𝓭𝓪𝔂!
Will Smith Tada emoticonPatrick (Cake) [V1] Will Smith Tada Emoticon But I Flipped It Over by AlphaShitlord 
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PennedinWhite Featured By Owner Sep 18, 2018  Hobbyist Writer
Happy Birthday!!! :cake:

:heart:
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WindySilver Featured By Owner Sep 18, 2018  Hobbyist Writer
Happy birthday!birthday cake 
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RTNightmare Featured By Owner Sep 18, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
Happy birthday!
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