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Pyrotherium romeroi by DiBgd Pyrotherium romeroi by DiBgd
Pyrotherium romeroi
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:iconcartoonben:
CartoonBen Featured By Owner Sep 8, 2017  Student Digital Artist
:) (Smile) You know what's funny? When I first saw the pyrotherium, I thought it looked like a relative of moeritherium. But when I looked it up, it wasn't. It was actually a Xenungulate (or at least an animal that belonged to a unique family of ungulate-type animals, but not odd-toed ungulates like the similar tapir, or even-toed ungulates like pigs).
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:iconacepredator:
acepredator Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2018
We don’t know if pyrotheres were xenungulates.
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:iconcartoonben:
CartoonBen Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2018  Student Digital Artist
:shrappy: Oh well. Helix Fossil Paraflutus Icon Avatar Musical Fakemon The evidence of every prehistoric animal and their environment (including plants, fungi, bacteria, etc) are known to hold a lot of mysteries and secrets we can't figure out (whether we solve any of them or not). Scared SherlockI am a paleontologistIn search for answers
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:iconthemightysaurus:
TheMightySaurus Featured By Owner Dec 13, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
I don't know what it is but it's adorable and I want one!!!
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:iconqueenelsafan2015:
queenElsafan2015 Featured By Owner Sep 1, 2014  Student Filmographer
These guys were in ice age movies
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:iconclawedfrog:
Clawedfrog Featured By Owner Jul 9, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Wow, this is great!
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:iconzimices:
Zimices Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2014  Hobbyist
Nice, I appreciate that it looks not specially elephant-like :)
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:iconmacgobhain:
macgobhain Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2014
Ah, one of nature's ugliest creations... well done! 
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:iconpeteridish:
PeteriDish Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
diod it have fiery farts? XD
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:iconthemorlock:
TheMorlock Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2014  Student General Artist
I like it. :)
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:iconherofan135:
herofan135 Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Such a cool creature, great artwork!
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:iconwesdaaman:
Wesdaaman Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2014  Student General Artist
Ah yes, an ancient and distant cousin of the Macrauchenia and Toxodon.
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:icontassietyger:
tassietyger Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I remember reading about the controversies of that group, particularly among xenungulates in which they might be evolutionary distant cousin to us.
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:iconavancna:
avancna Featured By Owner Apr 30, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
You mean like how the uintatheres/dinoceratans may have evolved from a group of rabbit-like animals, and that the uintatheres may have came down from North America into South America (possibly via island hopping) into South America during the Paleocene?
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:icontassietyger:
tassietyger Featured By Owner Apr 30, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yep! That one!
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:iconavancna:
avancna Featured By Owner Apr 30, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
That might be true, though, we still need to determine if uintatheres are related to that group, and if that group really is a member of Euarchontoglires, and if uintatheres were able to swim into South America.
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:icontassietyger:
tassietyger Featured By Owner Apr 30, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I agree! Has there been any recent phylogenetic study that involved those mammals?
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:iconavancna:
avancna Featured By Owner Apr 30, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I'm not sure, honestly.
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:iconwesdaaman:
Wesdaaman Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2014  Student General Artist
Well, when you put Pyrotheres, Astrapotheres, Xenungulates, Notoungulates and Litopterns together, that makes up Meridiungulates, coming from the same ancestors and Xenarthrans did.
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:iconjwartwork:
JWArtwork Featured By Owner Apr 6, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Pyrotheres and Astrapotheres might actually be closer to proboscideans, whilst the rest of these weird groups of South-American mammals (Litopterns, Notoungulates, Xenungulates, did I miss one?) would likely be related to ungulates, but split off from that branch very early.
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:iconwesdaaman:
Wesdaaman Featured By Owner Apr 6, 2014  Student General Artist
We definitely have more questions than answers.

I sense that the Meridiungulates, the Xenarthrans and the Afrotheres fit together in a clade of placental Eutherians called Atlantogenata.
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:iconjwartwork:
JWArtwork Featured By Owner Apr 6, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I think the group might have been polyphyletic, with some being close to, or even members of, the Afrotheria, whilst other might have been Laurasiatheres, however, I think Xenarthrans are more basal then Afrotheres and Laurasiatheres, and therefore not particularly closely related to Meridiungulates (if you can even call that one group of animals at all). But that is my take on it, I am not a qualified paleontologist or anything. :D
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:iconwesdaaman:
Wesdaaman Featured By Owner Apr 6, 2014  Student General Artist
Like I said, we always have more questions than answers
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:iconjwartwork:
JWArtwork Featured By Owner Apr 6, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Exactly.
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:icontassietyger:
tassietyger Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
That is one theory. The alternatives include that they are are related to perissodactyls another that this is a polyphyletic grouping with some related to primates and rabbits, others to elephants and others to artiodactyls.
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:iconmacgobhain:
macgobhain Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2014
What theory is this? I haven't read it. I'm interested.
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:icontassietyger:
tassietyger Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Which one?
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:iconmacgobhain:
macgobhain Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2014
Both, actually.
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:iconzimices:
Zimices Featured By Owner Apr 3, 2014  Hobbyist
Then you could be interested in these papers:

Billet, Guillaume. "New observations on the skull of Pyrotherium (Pyrotheria, Mammalia) and new phylogenetic hypotheses on South American ungulates." Journal of mammalian evolution 17.1 (2010): 21-59.

Agnolin, Federico L., and Nicolás R. Chimento. "Afrotherian affinities for endemic South American “ungulates”." Mammalian Biology-Zeitschrift für Säugetierkunde 76.2 (2011): 101-108.

Billet, Guillaume, and Thomas Martin. "No evidence for an afrotherian-like delayed dental eruption in South American notoungulates." Naturwissenschaften 98.6 (2011): 509-517.

Cifelli RL (1993) The phylogeny of the Native South American Ungulates. In: Szalay FS, Novacek M, McKenna MC, editors.Mammal Phylogeny. II Placentals. Springer-Verlag, 195–216.


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:iconwesdaaman:
Wesdaaman Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2014  Student General Artist
Yet even though they may resemble certain other Mammals, that does not mean they are necessarily closely related to them.
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:icontassietyger:
tassietyger Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Indeed!
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