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:iconacrazymind:
acrazymind Featured By Owner Sep 23, 2015
Studying Hogarth is never a bad idea, but make sure you don't just copy his drawing but try to understand how they are put together. Your rendering is pretty decent, but without understanding of form it brings the very danger of becoming a human copying machine. Simplify anatomy and memorise how parts relate to each other, and you will be able to draw a lot more freely, even without reference.
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:icondesenez88:
desenez88 Featured By Owner Edited Oct 4, 2015  Professional General Artist
Ohhh Thank you for the advice. I JUST NOW notice your comment. Can I ask waht do you propose for me to do to understand the anatomy better? I am drawing/copying because I realy want to be an illustrator and I just want to develop my drawing skills as best as I can. it feels very 2d and static when I draw, if you understand what I mean. I dont have a feeling of depth And movement. What do you think I should do at the moment. Thank you so much for your inside and looking forward to hear from you.
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:iconacrazymind:
acrazymind Featured By Owner Oct 4, 2015
No problem, this will be a long one:

One of the most important things is to think in three dimensions. When you copy from books, photos or other drawings, you look at the flat image and analyse the relation of shapes, lines, values etc to each other, then try to reproduce them. But during that process, you don't think of the actual shapes and how they would behave in space.
So if I was to ask you to draw one of the Hogarth hands again, but from a different angle by rotating it in your head, chances are that you would not be able to produce something that looks as well-defined and finished as your regular copies.

To counter that, it's a good idea to break down objects into simple geometric shapes, such as boxes, cylinders, pyramids, cones and spheres. Note that flat (2d) forms like rectangle, square or circle don't count here, since we need three-dimensionality. Practice drawing these shapes from as many different angles as possible from life (cans, cereal boxes, etc), then from your imagination, until you can easily and quickly reproduce them at any angle or foreshortening. Always draw through, which means also draw the backside of the object that you don't actually see - that way you train to think in three dimensions.
Next you can try to combine these shapes to form bigger shapes, such as animals made from a box as the body, a sphere as the head, cylinders as legs and neck etc. Try different poses, then rotate them in your head and draw them from different angles - after the simple shape practice this should now be a lot easier.

Finally, you do exactly the same thing with anatomy - it does not matter how detailed your shading is or how accurate you can copy, what's important is that you're aware that the things you're drawing are not flat but have dimension. It's better to spend hours drawing many rib cages from different angles until you truly understand its form, than to spend hours to draw a single picture that looks nicely shaded and meticulously rendered out. It's important to remember that you're not doing this to make a pretty picture, but to learn so you can later make pretty pictures.

Because of this whole "thinking in 3d" thing, it's much more helpful to draw from life than pictures - so see if you can find life drawing classes with models where you live, see if you can get hold of a plastic skeleton or at least a skull to draw from, or just throw a few things together on your desk and draw those.

Upload one every day so you'll stay motivated.
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:icondesenez88:
desenez88 Featured By Owner Oct 5, 2015  Professional General Artist
Wow. This is exactly what I need it to hear. Thank you. I already order online a few solid 3d shapes to start understanding the basics. Looking for a skull next☺. After, hopefully I am brave enough to take a live drawing session. I live in London, so it can't be hard to find one. Keep in touch. Very grateful for your help.
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:iconacrazymind:
acrazymind Featured By Owner Oct 5, 2015
You're very welcome. Yes, finding life drawing in London should be simple - but don't hesitate too long. If you wait until you "feel ready" you might end up pushing it away further and further - just jump right into it, see what you're struggling with, then practice that at home, and see if you can do a better job of that particular area next time. That way you'll know where your weaknesses are and will be able to direct your studies accordingly.
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