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The Trial of Lord Carnarvon. by dashinvaine The Trial of Lord Carnarvon. by dashinvaine
Pencil and biro drawing, scanned and coloured in photoshop, with a papyrus texture overrlayed from 
freestock.deviantart.com/art/P…
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George Herbert, 5th Earl of Carnarvon (1866-1923), was the patron of Howard Carter and of the expedition that discovered the tomb of Tutankhamun in the Valley of the Kings, in Egypt. He was also the first victim of the supposed curse on that tomb, dying shortly after its violation. The sory is that he was bitten on the cheek by a mosquoito that flew out of the tomb, and later picked up an infection while shaving and nicking the bite mark. At the moment of his death the lights flickered out in Cairo, and his dog, Susie, back home in England (in his ancestral home Downton Abbey Highclere Castle) howled and also dropped down dead.

So I was thinking of replicating an Egyptian book of the dead, but I wanted to do something a bit quirky rather than a complete pastiche. The idea of representing Lord Carnarvon's encounter with the Egyptian gods of judgment in the afterlife occurred to me. Here Carnarvon's heart is found to weigh more than the feather of truth, which does not bode well for his soul. Seems he breeched one of the 42 Commandments, specifically number XXXIII, against stealing from the dead...

iamspirituality.com/42-ancient…

The agrieved Tuthankhamun appears before Osiris, the lord of the Undeworld, testifying against the defendant. Ammit, the devourer of souls licks her lips.
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:iconlunargue:
Lunargue Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2018  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Kind of remind me some scene of Tintin, "Cigar's of the Pharaoh"
(6:30)
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:iconrichardely:
RichardEly Featured By Owner Jan 30, 2018
Where I grew up (Bucks County PA) we would say 'licks his chops'.  Not looking good for the Lord.  I saw the Tut exhibit when it toured the States back in the late 1970's.
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:iconneferchau:
Neferchau Featured By Owner Dec 8, 2017  Hobbyist General Artist
This is really awesome! And well done!
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:iconbradleyeb:
BradleyEB Featured By Owner Dec 1, 2017
I like how Carnarvon’s dog is there too, his dog died not long after he did. The lights in Cairo also went out at the moment of his death. Coincidences!!!
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:iconlordvadernihilus:
LordVaderNihilus Featured By Owner Aug 8, 2017  Hobbyist General Artist
Tut - and if openning my tomb wasnt enought he asked others to get rid of my bandages using a knife, he took my gold, he left my body looking as if Sobek had played with me and he dismember me!!!
Isis and Osiris - is that so?
Lord Carnarvon - .....thres a good exponation for this
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:iconcodeyellow07:
Codeyellow07 Featured By Owner May 22, 2017
FUCKING YES!
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:iconnonier:
NonieR Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2017
This continues to delight me every time I see it!
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:iconscarlethorn:
scarlethorn Featured By Owner May 7, 2016
I like this. Although, I don't think Carnarvon's heart would weigh more then Maat's feather, as he did bring Tutankhamen's name back into use- thus ensuring his existance after being erased. Same with Carter.
Now Douglas Derry-- would feed Amut. He's the one that tore Tut's body apart trying to remove it from the sarcophogus.
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:iconphilhellenike:
Philhellenike Featured By Owner Apr 29, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
karma is a bitch :D I love the "awww shit..." look on Lord Carnarvon's face! 
hope Susie is clear though...
Do the hieroglyphs relate to the scene? 
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:iconrd-dd1843:
RD-DD1843 Featured By Owner Feb 13, 2016
Imagine what would be the scene when Carter died!
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:iconpokermind:
Pokermind Featured By Owner Dec 13, 2015
Loved it have to Fave it.  Sic 'im Ammit!
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:iconpsyfire-satra:
Psyfire-Satra Featured By Owner Dec 6, 2015
This really is a wonderful piece. Clever, and well done. I think my favorite part is Ammit licking her chops in anticipation.
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:iconcoffeegoeswild:
coffeegoeswild Featured By Owner May 25, 2015
Brilliant idea, and adding the dog is particularly nice touch. Thanks for giving this old Egyptian history buff a much needed laugh...
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:iconenkililsta8411:
EnkiLilstA8411 Featured By Owner Edited May 7, 2015  Professional Artist
feather doesn't even have a weight^^.......comon sense ¬¬
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:iconphilipharvey:
PhilipHarvey Featured By Owner May 6, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Howard Carter was a superb artist (as you well know) his painting of Horus is just ridiculously good, alas I cannot seem to find it online. It was featured in a Dan Cruikshank documentary I watched a few years ago. Your work here is also excellent,  its really effective. :)
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:icondashinvaine:
dashinvaine Featured By Owner Edited May 6, 2015
He was indeed, and I find it fitting that such marvellous artworks as the tomb contained were discovered by a man who was also an artist. I got to see some of Carter's paintings at an exhibition on the discovery of Tut's tomb, in Oxford last year, and they were indeed very fine. There were also some beautiful paintings of Egyptian artefacts by Winifred Brunton, who is also worth checking out. 
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:iconphilipharvey:
PhilipHarvey Featured By Owner May 6, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I shall have a look. :)
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:iconmensjedezeemeermin:
MensjeDeZeemeermin Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2015
It's creepy as hell--I read a story to this effect a long time ago--but very successful, graphically.
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:iconpgwainbenn:
PGwainbenn Featured By Owner Mar 25, 2015
Wonderfull idea!

I just think, that's a little bit hard on Lord Carnavon. He made Tutenchamuns name known to all people after all, which is also a form of worship (doesn't the stones fo the noble tell the passing people to remember their names, so they should live forever?). Lord Carnavon made Tutenchamun more prominent than Ramses II, he should be really grateful! Otherwise he would be forgotten by history by now for sure!
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:icondashinvaine:
dashinvaine Featured By Owner Mar 26, 2015
That would be the case for the defence, certainly.

I admire Mr Carter and Lord Carnarvon. This isn't to be taken too seriously.
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:iconpgwainbenn:
PGwainbenn Featured By Owner Mar 26, 2015
I know that and I really adore your art. It looks very authentic!
I really hope, Lord Carnavon has a good advocate ;)
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:iconlugia20711:
Lugia20711 Featured By Owner Mar 20, 2015  Hobbyist Writer
This is a great idea! I don't think Howard Carter is going to like what is waiting for him on the other side. 

It would be great to see something like this with Howard Carter in the Hall of Judgement.
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:iconcelestialhost:
Celestialhost Featured By Owner Jan 17, 2015  Hobbyist Writer
Nice idea!
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:iconfaile35:
faile35 Featured By Owner Dec 27, 2014   Traditional Artist
Love the hat placed on the hat-rack, and how the doomed Mr. Carnarvon's English suit lends itself to the Egyptian pose. What's in his outer pocket? A stolen cartouche? Also, are the hieroglyphics a real translation of the situation/story? Overall, a very impressive bit of fun here. :nod:
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:iconpensive-penumbra:
Pensive-Penumbra Featured By Owner Aug 1, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
A brilliant idea; wonderfully executed!
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:iconzousha:
Zousha Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
This is hilarious! :D
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:iconguljarol:
GulJarol Featured By Owner Apr 12, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
My first thought was if the "contemporary" bloke was Carter. Then I read the description, and I know I wasn't that far off ;)

Great ancient Egypt look! :)
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:iconijustlikehalo:
ijustlikehalo Featured By Owner Apr 10, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
This was the most likely outcome.
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:iconcarolehumphreys:
CaroleHumphreys Featured By Owner Apr 9, 2014  Professional Traditional Artist
I like the way your Egyptian inspiration is taking you into so many mediums. I wonder if Susie might be a distant ancester of Buster? The humour in this is delightful, from the cheeky plonking of his hat on an artefact, Ammit licking her lips, Carnarvon walking like an Egyptian (adopting their same stance), etc. It's brilliantly done.

Thanks for the mention of my Nefertiti pic in a comment :)
I'm pleased the Ashmolean has been so inspirational.
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:icondashinvaine:
dashinvaine Featured By Owner Apr 10, 2014
Yes, thanks hopefully I achieved a credible representation of a 1920s gent as he would look if he was mystically sucked into an ancient Egyptian document...

I found myself doing some trigonometry the other night to establish all the relevant angles and proportions of the Great Pyramid, so there's a possibility a scale model of that might follow, although as yet I'm not sure of the medium. That stemmed from being reminded of the intriguing fact that the pyramid's height is the same relation to the circumference of its square base as the radius of a circle has the the circumferene of a circle. This seems to indicates that the Egyptians has discovered pi, well before the Greeks...

If I don't make a pyramid I might try my hand at a Fayum portrait, on the other end of ancient Egyptian history. Some time, anyway.

I don't know if Buster descends from Susie (He should be selukie...) Speaking of distant ancestry, apparently the Herbert familily (that of Lord Carnarvon) are connected to the Scudamores. I have some Scudamore ancestry on my mother's side, so that was a nice connection to discover. I only found that out last week... (How the mighty have fallen).
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:iconarlesienne:
Arlesienne Featured By Owner Apr 8, 2014
What a wonderful satirical artwork! I love every detail - the little baboon with a sophisticated expression, Ammit like a big dog waiting for a treat. I simply adore the skilful mix of two themes: Ancient Egypt with all its splendour and a plain, but rather snobistic "full English gentleman". Of course, he's fully equipped for his times: he's got a favourite hound, a walking stick (you could even make it more decorated like ending with a mahogany sphere or something like that), his smoking, even a stolen artifact from another culture is in "its proper place" :mwahaha:! Wonderful, this is just awesome.
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:icondashinvaine:
dashinvaine Featured By Owner Apr 8, 2014
Ammit's looking forward to a full English breakfast...
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:iconarlesienne:
Arlesienne Featured By Owner Apr 8, 2014
Exactly! :D
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:iconhecci666:
Hecci666 Featured By Owner Apr 7, 2014  Student Traditional Artist
This is awesome, well done!
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:iconlelonibunny:
LeloniBunny Featured By Owner Apr 7, 2014
OOohhh! Very nice recreation of the art style.  And quite historically accurate I'd say.

Do I see a pocketed little idol that Carnarvon snatched up while sneaking a quick look into the tomb before the press arrived?  Very telling of his heart's weight and some nice details.
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:icondashinvaine:
dashinvaine Featured By Owner Apr 7, 2014
Cheers. Yes. There are also some Egyptian bits and pieces in Highclere Castle, which presumably His Lordship brought back from his earlier digs... 

Apparently there was a spell in the Book of the Dead to keep the deceased's heart from speaking and revealing the questionable doings of it's former owner. Still, it would be beneath an English gentleman to resort to such ignoble enchantments... That's not cricket.
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:iconlelonibunny:
LeloniBunny Featured By Owner Apr 7, 2014
Weren't those spells supposed to be for each individual heart?  Thus without his own personally scribed book, Lord Carnarvon is.... well dead.
(Granted, books were just streamlined with generic "fill in the name" after awhile.  But the belief remains.)
Being the English gent that he is, George is probably relying on Susie to save his soul.  He'll find out why one doesn't mess with Ammit.
Again, really nicely done piece.
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:iconloverofbeauty:
loverofbeauty Featured By Owner Apr 7, 2014
I really like the cheeky feel of this piece, and I definitely recognize all the imagery from the book of the dead. What's your opinion on the whole "mummy's curse", though? I'm well aware of the "death on swift wings" part of the story, and that people mysteriously died after the excavations, but I've heard that the general consensus today is that the whole idea of curses on tombs was really much less significant than archeologists made it out to be. Most of the hype was drummed up by the media in an effort to publicize the story of the excavation. 
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:icondashinvaine:
dashinvaine Featured By Owner Apr 7, 2014
I don't believe in the curse. The fact that Howard Carter survived for quite a long time afterwards makes it seem less credible, for one thing. Maybe there was something unhealthy in the tombs to which he built up an immunity over the years, since he was a frequent delver into such places, but I don't think supernatural forces were at work. (Carnarvon's daughter, Lady Evelyn Herbert, who was one of the first people into the tomb, had a long life thereafter, too.) Yes, media hype.  If there was a curse it failed to strike down two of its three most obvious targets. 
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:icongrassa48:
grassa48 Featured By Owner Apr 7, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
Delightful. You have truly caught the ancient style of art. Yes, I imagine that King Tut would not be happy with Carnarvon. His body was treated with very little respect.
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:icondashinvaine:
dashinvaine Featured By Owner Apr 7, 2014
Thanks. To be fair, I believe Carnarvon was out of the picture by the time Tut's mummy was unwrapped. I don't much approve of the unwrapping of mummies in any case. However, I hear mummies have been subjected to worse indignities over the years, from being ground up for paint pigments and medical potions, used to making paper, or burned as fuel in steam trains. (Some of that is out of order.)
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:icongrassa48:
grassa48 Featured By Owner Apr 7, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
Not to mention mummy wrappings being used to make paper. During the American Civil War, I think.
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:icontheophilia:
Theophilia Featured By Owner Apr 7, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Hahaha, I love that he has a hat-stand conveniently behind him. :XD:

I do love the idea; it's quite a fun one. :D What's even more funny is that I have also recently been on an Egypt-high...and looking particularly at the Amarna period too (funny how that works out ;-)). I found myself also looking at Hatshepsut's famous step-son Thutmose III and his obelisks that seemed to end up everywhere except in Egypt... :XD:

Do the hieroglyphics mean anything in particular? I do recognize Tutankhamun's cartouche above him, but otherwise I can't profess to be any scholar of Egyptian hieroglyphics.
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:icondashinvaine:
dashinvaine Featured By Owner Apr 7, 2014
The hieroglyphics on this image are mostly copied from the burial chamber of Thutankhamun, so I presume they are vaguely relevant, even though I have not attempted to translate the bulk of them. An exception is the column of symbols behind Osiris, which is copied from a similar position in the Hunefer Book of the Dead, and which seems to be something about Isis and Nephthys. (I should have included a figure of the goddess Nephthys too, as I notice her hieroglyph is in there below the one for Isis - which is the throne, the same as the one on her head. We can assume Nephthys is just off camera...) The heiroglyphs over Lord Carnarvon are his title and name, in phonetic Hieroglyphics. Someone who knows hieroglyphics properly would probably tell me I've got it terribly wrong.  The bent throwing-stick glyph near Carnarvon's face is the symbol for 'foreigner'. 

The Egyptomania bugmust be going about. I went to the Ashmolean in Oxford with Carole Humphreys, recently. They have a fairly impressive Egyptian section. It has some good Amarna-era stuff, including the bit of wall panting that inspired the background on her Nefertiti drawing, as it happens... That was a serendipitous discovery. (Also a headrest of the type she featured in the drawing, on my suggestion).

Nefertiti by CaroleHumphreys

As for Hatshepsut and Thutmose III, I included their cartouches on the two Horus figures I made earlier, so that is also a coincidence, to come to think of it. The Obelist in London (so-called 'Cleopatra's Needle') is one of Thutmose III's. They do get about! I wonder what the ancient Egyptians would think if they knew their monuments would go on to grace cities in lands they had never even heard of, in nations yet to be established, or that people from these strange distant shores would be the ones to rediscover the writings and the lost civilization in Egypt... Perhaps that last fact might persuade the gods to judge Carnarvon et al a bit more leniently...
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:iconjuha91:
juha91 Featured By Owner Apr 7, 2014
Intriguing idea and just wonderful artwork! You have managed to imitate ancient Egyptian art style quite well. 
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:icondashinvaine:
dashinvaine Featured By Owner Apr 7, 2014
Thanks. The main inspirations/sources for components featured here are the murals in Tutankhamun's burial chamber, and the Papyrus of Hunefer, a slightly later example of a Book of the Dead.

www.highres.factum-arte.org/Tu…

www.britishmuseum.org/explore/…
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:iconundevicesimus:
Undevicesimus Featured By Owner Apr 7, 2014  Student Digital Artist
Great artwork, but a harsh concept :fear:
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:icondashinvaine:
dashinvaine Featured By Owner Apr 7, 2014
Them's the rules...
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:iconmensjedezeemeermin:
MensjeDeZeemeermin Featured By Owner Apr 7, 2014
Grim, but the outright tomb robbers should have fared much worse.  At least Carnavon and Carter did their best to study and learn from the tomb, and preserve its treasures.  The Greeks felt that even being talked about conferred immortality.  By that standard, Tutankhamen scored.
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:icondashinvaine:
dashinvaine Featured By Owner Apr 7, 2014
I am a great admirer of Carter, Carnarvon and co. But I wouldn't necessarily expect the old gods or the deified pharaohs to draw much of a distinction between scholarly archaeologists and greedy robbers... The fundamental act of removing stuff from tombs that was intended to stay there is the same, after all, so it's sacrilege either way.
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