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News:
A feature snagged my attention - I really shouldn't be online, I have a test tomorrow. I'd like to say thanks to everyone who has favorited, commented, watched and featured me - I am tremendously grateful for all the attention my work has received. I get very excited over feedback and it means a lot to me. To everyone who has left me anything in the past few weeks - I'm about to hit finals, and will return as of mid-May. If you really want to contact me in the short term, try me at my website - that contact form leads straight to my inbox, which I cannot afford but to check daily. Otherwise, I'll see you in two weeks or so, and I'll be as long-winded and excitable as ever.

Thank you very much!

Soon to come:
- Wood Fae
- Ivy Circlet

About the Masks:
Generally speaking, the masks are painted formed leather, usually in a single layer. They're hand-sculpted with no mold, and occasionally surface carving or tooling is employed. They are lined in suede and unvarnished on the inner face to preserve the natural breathing quality of the leather for comfort. The outer face is painted and water-resistant. By virtue of the quality of materials, they tend to be reasonably durable, gently flexible, and very lightweight.

Commission Information:
If you like any of the masks in my gallery or would like a custom mask, please feel free to ask. All sales are by commission - very rarely do I have extra masks laying around for sale, because if they aren't created with an owner in mind I tend to get too attached, and because I have precious little spare time. (The good news is it means more versatility in what you can request.) My availability for commission varies tremendously because I have a full-time life entirely outside of artwork - 80% of the year I am cramming any art I do into a 27-hour-a-day schedule. However, I am open for inquiry at any time. If you are a dA member, you can write me a note; otherwise, you can contact me through my website, whatever you feel comfortable with.

Clubs to Look Into
:iconleatherartisans: :iconmask-making-artisans:
LeatherArtisans - Gorgeous leatherwork by talented craftspeople, a club with a warm and open community.
Mask-Making-Artisans - A maskmaker's community showcasing a number of artists and some very diverse styles.
  • Reading: Introduction to Chinese
  • Eating: Haagen-Dazs Cinnamon Dulce de Leche ice cream
  • Drinking: Lychee soda
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:iconebell1:
ebell1 Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2007  Hobbyist
good luck on your test!!!! learning chinese? woa Oo i'd be afeared to touch it!
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:iconcwicseolfor:
cwicseolfor Featured By Owner May 29, 2007  Hobbyist General Artist
I've enjoyed it. I may major. It's really not much harder than other languages - the grammar is easier by far than most romance languages, and there's no conjugation or declension; it's just learning to write is really... something else. Once you learn radicals, however, you begin to understand. The spoken portion's actually really simple once you've mastered tones, which was hard for me, but helps if you've had music training...
Plus it's useful in my house - my parents have a thing for foreign films, and we have dozens of things I can watch in Mandarin - even with simplified or traditional subtitles, sometimes.
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:iconebell1:
ebell1 Featured By Owner May 29, 2007  Hobbyist
wow..i am used to watching subtitles due to my deafness but languages are really hard for me because even trying to learn spanish..i sucked at trying to master the tones and such..lol i had to go to speech therapy for 8 years just to master my 1rst language......english lol
Reply
:iconcwicseolfor:
cwicseolfor Featured By Owner May 29, 2007  Hobbyist General Artist
Hearing problems would certainly make a difficult language harder - Chinese, or any tonal language, would be particularly tricky because the meaning of a word can be entirely dependent upon tonal quality. Non-tonal languages, like the romance languages, are probably the best bet. The advantage of the internet is that so many written materials become available. If you can find Spanish-language films with Spanish subtitles, this might help. And then there's the simple fact that, if you have a basic vocabulary, nobody generally cares if you don't speak with a native accent, it's just handy to have available (or at least Spanish would be in my area - but no, I took French, Latin and Chinese. Sometimes I wonder if I'm trying to make my life more complicated... ^-^)
Reply
:iconebell1:
ebell1 Featured By Owner May 30, 2007  Hobbyist
lol i want to learn gailic....
Reply
:iconcwicseolfor:
cwicseolfor Featured By Owner May 30, 2007  Hobbyist General Artist
I want to have at least five languages by old age - inclusive of at least French, Italian, Chinese, Japanese, and likely Spanish - but if I had an opportunity to learn Scots Gaelic that'd be wonderful; too much of my family history's in it for me to feel comfortable letting it die.

...In fact, Welsh and Anglo-Saxon sound good ("cwicseolfor" is the latter); picking up the Tudor dialect would make Shakespeare more fun to read; I'd love to learn Arabic. I've studied Latin, and I'm terrible at it, though it's beautiful; maybe Medieval Latin (as opposed to Classical, which is ALL inflected) might go better for me. And then, of COURSE - I have to learn Tolkien's Sindarin Elvish at some point... ^-^

I like languages too much for my own good.......
Reply
:iconebell1:
ebell1 Featured By Owner May 30, 2007  Hobbyist
XD sindarin elvish would be totally awesome! i don't know about 5..i would be mainly happy with welsh and gailic but eh..like i said tones are so hard for me..i kind of gave up on sepaking it...i can read some of it though..i wonder if that counts ^__^
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April 26, 2007
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