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:iconbeautyliesintheeye:
beautyliesintheeye Featured By Owner Mar 2, 2017
Though extremely difficult to appreciate fully because of the wide variety of takes and techniques, your drawings reveal a very clear talent and a technical maturity that should enable you to truly widen your scope, should you decide to focus on this art.
At any rate, some very good drawings. Keep it up! ;-)
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:iconcrigger:
Crigger Featured By Owner Mar 21, 2017  Professional General Artist

Thanks for the appreciation.

One reason for wide variety of takes and techniques is that I’ve been actively doing art since the 1990’s and have explored many different styles/media/concepts. I’ve always been fascinated by how style can influence content, for example an old academic painted landscape (based on the same location with the same painting composition) will be different from a impressionist interpretation of the same location, will be different from a cubist interpretation, will be different from a fauvist, etc. So while the basic iconography is the same (landscape) because of the different stylistic translations they each express something a little different.

Related to this for about the last 5 years I’ve been doing variations on the same skull design (if you bounce around the link below you can see some of them). While the basic iconography and composition is essentially the same, by varying colors, styles, techniques etc., the final concept is altered.

www.flickr.com/photos/craigwal…

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:iconbeautyliesintheeye:
beautyliesintheeye Featured By Owner Mar 21, 2017
Ah! So I actually had it backwards... lol
Thank you for your circumstantiated answer. And yes, I do concur style does matter (as you can obviously tell from almost any "favorite" folder out there).
In that sense, we are in an almost style-less period, as in not with any new, original and overbearing style, though that may just come from History not having yet acted upon our production and sent to oblivion almost all but one type of "production" kept for posterity as the era's take on art... ;-)
Thank you for your answer and your time. ;-)
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:iconcrigger:
Crigger Featured By Owner Mar 27, 2017  Professional General Artist

I wouldn’t say that we live in a truly style-less period, while multiplicity carries the day you can notice some of the more popular trends:  Graffiti artists (like Banksy), Japanese Anime (I have a fondness of Afro-Samurai myself), comic book illustrators (Jim Lee, Frank Miller), cartoons (The Simpson, South Park) are some the trends I notice more.  Sort of like Andy Warhol’s soup cans, I notice the popularity of variations of popular characters (for example, there are SO many variations of Batman) which often gets translated into toys; Pop! Dorbz Mini-mates, etc.

One big schism I see is between what the much more formally trained academic art historian critics like and what popular culture’s tastes are. Way back in the day, say with artists like Michelangelo, formal critics and popular tastes were much more in agreement, while pretty much starting with the Impressionists, a schism has certainly been growing. 

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:iconbeautyliesintheeye:
beautyliesintheeye Featured By Owner Mar 27, 2017
You are absolutely correct. I am the one at fault here, having not been precise enough.
Though on the past as you know, we only read the winner's story (hence the "academic" take) but that doesn't mean that this was mainstream. Art took on different forms. Has also to do with the financial and practical capacity for "minority" artists to express themselves... and be remembered (as in having some part of their art preserved). In places like France, this had to do with minor and homely settings (food preparations, pots and pans, plates, knives, spoons, buttons, knitting, embroidery for wedding sets, sheets and even home made furniture. It was literally everywhere). Also of note, the fact that not so long ago (at least in historic terms) a lot of people used to practice a form of art or another, much more than was done during, say the 20th century. People wrote poems, drew and painted, played instruments. Even the pastors in the wild did so, manufacturing their pipes and flutes and drawing with charcoal. Wow, I let myself go astray a little here... lol
So by style I meant personal style. I would venture that the present chapels around anime characters or a manga's specifics is a stronger academic rule than the ones we were mentioning. And there are very very few artists or artists in becoming to actually manage to focus around one such universe and still see a personal style emerge. Because of this contradiction and sheer volume restriction, when one does it sticks like the nose in the middle of a face (love using literally translated idiomatic expressions, they sound so weird.. and funny). In DA think of people like Todraws, Casimir0304, Flowerzzxu etc. There are a lot more obvious ones, but I don't have their names handy.
That is what I meant by style. Same thing with the digital efforts: their chapels are almost dependent upon subjects and platforms. Hence the proliferation of some monster categories. But within those, very few emerge, but when they do, they are massively plebiscited: Artgem, Wlop etc.
Don't have much time tonight, but feel free to drop a message when you want. It is a great pleasure to discuss with one so attentive and reflecting. And taking the time to answer so precisely. Thank you my friend. ;-)
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:iconcrigger:
Crigger Featured By Owner Apr 6, 2017  Professional General Artist
You got some good stuff to talk about here, but I've been busy-busy. I will get back to you though.
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:iconbeautyliesintheeye:
beautyliesintheeye Featured By Owner Apr 6, 2017
I've only the regimental bottles at hand, so frenchgestimate is about a couple dozens good ones and maybe twice that in to be tested... Should last me about a couple of weeks if I'm careful... ;-)
So I'll stock up in case you show up late! :-)
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:iconcrigger:
Crigger Featured By Owner Apr 10, 2017  Professional General Artist

In the Western tradition there seems to be the basic assumption that the peasant majority just worked the fields, bowed to royalty, went to church, ate, drank, and slept despite the evidence to the contrary.  There were also a considerable amount of specialty craftsmen: woodworkers, blacksmiths, cloth dyers, etc, that shouldn’t be forgotten but usually are. I’m more familiar with the more wealthy Victorian women decorating plates and making intricate embroidery stuff. Personally I would have liked to see a lot of the small whittled wood carvings that people did, but since they weren’t in the overarching realistic academic style at the time more often than not just ended up burning in the fireplace.

 

In terms of developing a unique personal style, it’s a rare phenomenon than you think. Between the Renaissance and Impressionism there were NUMEROUS artists working in a similar basically idealized realistic tradition, but art history has largely separated the ones that were more stylistically and/or conceptually different. And after Impressionism, there are and continue to be numerous copycats in the more popular ‘isms’. Exploring different styles is fine and expected, but developing a personal style takes considerable amount of physical and mental work, which means lots of TIME… which is something most people don’t have the discipline of using effectively, or in actuality some people are just that busy.

 

As for digital platforms, I do recognize many of the similar ‘defaults’ that people use. I think the main problem with that is too many people ‘brainstorm’ with the program they intend to use, which inhibits creativity.  I personally like to do my brainstorming in a sketchbook where I’m less inhibited, THEN go to the specific medium that I think can best express the idea.

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