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Willi Fronhoefer's Heinkel He 100D-2

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On 31 August, JG 26 mounted various missions throughout the day and claimed 22 victories for the loss of five aircraft and pilots, the heaviest loss of pilots in a single day during the whole of the Battle of Britain. During a late afternoon mission the entire Geschwader took off to rendezvous with KG 76, which was to attack the RAF aerodrome at Hornchurch. As soon as the aircraft of Stab III./JG 26 crossed the coast, they were attacked by RAF fighters and Oblt. Wilhelm Fronhöfer of 9./JG 26 was one of three pilots shot down.  His aircraft, 'Yellow 10' was shot down by a Spitfire piloted by P/O C.F. Gray of RAF No. 54 Squadron. Fronhöfer made a force landing at Jubilee Hill Farm, Ulcombe, Sussex, England. He was uninjured. Fronhöfer had three kills to his credit at the time he was shot down. One known victory, his 1st, a Mureaux at Löwen on 15 May, 1940. His 2nd, a Spitfire I west of Dunkirk, 29 May, 1940. His 3rd, a Hurricane of RAF No. 141 Sq. at Folkestone on 15 August, 1940.

With an upper scheme of 70/71 Fronhöfer He 100D-2, WrNr 1184, was finished in the commonly seen III./JG 26 high demarcation camouflage style with no discernible mottling on the sides of the fuselage, fin or rudder. In keeping with the other aircraft of this Gruppe, the Balkenkreuz, Gruppe bar and aircraft number were smaller than usually seen. The 9. Staffel Hollenhund emblem and JG 26 'Schlageter' shield were carried on both sides of the fuselage beneath the cockpit. It is understood that the tip of the spinner was a lighter green than the remainder. The Werk Nummer on the fin is applied on a dark green rectangular background indicating that this aircraft was originally finished in a low-demarcation 70/71 camouflage scheme.
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Comments18
anonymous's avatar
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artlovr59's avatar
artlovr59Professional Photographer
I had no idea that Heinkeil 100s were used in the Battle of Britain. Very nice illustration, too!
comradeloganov's avatar
comradeloganovHobbyist General Artist
They weren't.  It's a what if profile in the scheme from a 109.  Almost all of my profiles are "What If" in one way or another.  Thanks!
artlovr59's avatar
artlovr59Professional Photographer
Aha! Still a nice illustration!
comradeloganov's avatar
comradeloganovHobbyist General Artist
Thanks!  I'll be posting some more shortly.
artlovr59's avatar
artlovr59Professional Photographer
I'll be looking out for 'em!
killerweinerdog's avatar
Awesome looking plane. Its a shame so little is known about it. 
comradeloganov's avatar
comradeloganovHobbyist General Artist
Indeed.  A desire to see that change is one of the main reasons behind these profiles.
CarrieMoore's avatar
CarrieMooreHobbyist Traditional Artist
Another superb profile!
comradeloganov's avatar
comradeloganovHobbyist General Artist
Thanks!
CarrieMoore's avatar
CarrieMooreHobbyist Traditional Artist
You're welcome
ZeroRM's avatar
Perhaps next you could draw an HE-100 with Erich Hartmann's livery?
comradeloganov's avatar
comradeloganovHobbyist General Artist
It's definitely on the list!
ZeroRM's avatar
Well, then move it to the front of the line!  I mean c'mon, this is Erich Hartmann, the Ace of Aces we're talking about here!
comradeloganov's avatar
comradeloganovHobbyist General Artist
Heh, well, Talos and I try to keep many of our profile lines roughly chronological.  The Ace of Aces is coming, but he's a little bit down the line, yet.  When we get the DB605 on the He 100, I imagine he won't be far behind.
ZeroRM's avatar
True; he didn't get his first kill until November of 1942, after having been stationed on the front lines for nine months already.  In about two and a half years he went on to score at least 356 confirmed victories (most of them, granted, were up against inferior opponents, but he was also a damned good shot and knew how to use the Bf-109's abilities to their fullest, abilities that the He-100 also had but to an even greater degree).
comradeloganov's avatar
comradeloganovHobbyist General Artist
Quite true, though he'd have missed the cowl guns.
ZeroRM's avatar
True, because he did mention at a couple of points that the one reason he held onto the 109 was because of those cowl guns, which gave a greater volume of fire focused into a smaller area, which made for more accurate shooting at any distance as opposed to having to shoot when at X number of feet away like on American fighters.
talos56's avatar
I'm a big fan of Bubi Hartmann, so trust me, we'll make something special there. ;)
anonymous's avatar
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