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Vought V-507 F-14A Vagabond - VF-84 Jolly Rogers by comradeloganov Vought V-507 F-14A Vagabond - VF-84 Jolly Rogers by comradeloganov
After the failure of the F-111B program, the US Navy began looking at alternative options for its replacement carrier fighter. In July 1968, the Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) issued a request for proposals (RFP) for the Naval Fighter Experimental (VFX) program. VFX called for a tandem two-seat, twin-engined air-to-air fighter with a maximum speed of Mach 2.2. It would also have a built-in M61 Vulcan cannon and a secondary close air support role. The VFX's air-to-air missiles would be either six AIM-54 Phoenix or a combination of six AIM-7 Sparrow and four AIM-9 Sidewinder missiles. Bids were received from General Dynamics, Grumman, Ling-Temco-Vought, McDonnell Douglas and North American Rockwell; four bids incorporated variable-geometry wings. It was also to use the Pratt & Whitney TF30 engine and AN/AWG-9 radar used on the F-111B to reduce cost and save development time.

Ling-Temco-Vought’s new TF30-powered A-7s were just entering service with the US Navy at that time and the F-8 Crusader was still serving, having earned a reputation for itself over Vietnam as a fine dogfighter. Despite this, swing wing technology was still in its infancy and LTV sought out a company with some experience in this new field. Dassault’s Mirage G prototype fighter was a twin engine, high performance fighter with variable geometry wings. In fact, one prototype was even powered by a variant of the same TF30 engine specified in the VFX program. Already teamed with Lockheed California Co for the VFX competition, the additional technical data provided by Dassault placed the Dallas firm in a strongly competitive position.

Vought’s V-507 proposal would bear a strong resemblance to the Mirage G including the distinctive intake cones found on the Lockheed F-104 and the Dassault Mirage series of fighters. Vought would also build a full scale mockup of the V-507 proposal, the only company in the VFX competition to do so. The maturity of the V-507 design, the experience of Vought with the TF30 engine and variable geometry wings (with Dassault’s assistance), and Vought’s track record on the F-8 and A-7 programs would eventually carry the day. While not considered to be necessarily the fastest or most maneuverable design of those proposed, the V-507 was judged to have the lowest risk of the proposals while still easily meeting all the requirements outlined by NAVAIR. In the wake of the F-111B fiasco, the VFX program was being closely monitored by Congress and this would prove to be a factor in the decision. The Defense Department awarded Ling-Temco-Vought the F-14A contract in January of 1969. The contract was signed on February 3, 1969, and Vought christened the aircraft the Vagabond.

The Vought F-14A Vagabond (BuNo 15798) first flew on November 23, 1970, just 21 months after the contract was signed and nearly two months ahead of schedule. In order to save time and forestall interference from Secretary McNamara, the Navy skipped the prototype phase and jumped directly to full-scale development. The first 12 F-14As Vought produced were earmarked for development and testing. Most of the problems encountered during testing related to the troublesome TF30 engines that would continue to plague the F-14A throughout its service life. Despite this, VF-124, the fleet readiness training squadron, received its first F-14 in March of 1972. The first two F-14 fleet squadrons, VF-1 and VF-2 were commissioned on August 12, 1972 at NAS Miramar. These two squadrons deployed on the USS Enterprise in June, 1974.

The infamous Jolly Rogers, VF-84, began their transition to the Vought F-14A Vagabond in March 1976, becoming operational on the new type in 1977. Together with sister squadron VF-41, they were moved to Carrier Air Wing 8 (CVW-8), deploying aboard the USS Nimitz. They started on their first Tomcat cruise on 1 December 1977, and were at sea until 20 July of 1978. The large single tail of the mighty Vagabond was ideal for a dramatic display of the Jolly Rogers' colors. Changes from the scheme last used on the Phantoms were those mandated by the different fuselage design, although the skull and crossbones motif took on a more modern look. The Vagabond in this profile is presented in its Navy legacy scheme of gull gray over white, with white horizontal control surfaces. The Jolly Rogers adapted well to the Tomcat on this first Med cruise aboard the Nimitz, and the media started to take notice of the sleek new fighters with their colorful livery.
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:iconalucard234564:
Alucard234564 Featured By Owner Dec 23, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Is this a real plane?
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:iconcomradeloganov:
comradeloganov Featured By Owner Dec 23, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Depends on your definition of "real". Did this plane actually exist in this scheme? No. It was a competitor to the actual F-14 Tomcat, but it lost the competition. It's the LTV V-507, and it did at least exist in full size mockup form.

content-25.foto.my.mail.ru/mai…
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:iconalucard234564:
Alucard234564 Featured By Owner Dec 24, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Good enough
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:iconcaniswolfe:
caniswolfe Featured By Owner Aug 24, 2014  Hobbyist Photographer
You earned a Watch. 
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:iconcomradeloganov:
comradeloganov Featured By Owner Aug 24, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Thanks! I'm glad you like it! Check out my most recent V-507 with Phoenixes, too!
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:iconcaniswolfe:
caniswolfe Featured By Owner Aug 25, 2014  Hobbyist Photographer
Willdo! 
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:iconhttyd2loverqueen:
HTTYD2loverQueen Featured By Owner Apr 7, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I just love the Jolly Rogers especially the F/A 18 Superhornets and the old CORSAIRS I have a HUMONGOUS passion for the Navy
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:iconcomradeloganov:
comradeloganov Featured By Owner Apr 7, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
It was a scheme that really fit the plane well since it was the competitor to the Tomcat.
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:iconhttyd2loverqueen:
HTTYD2loverQueen Featured By Owner Apr 7, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Yeah your right
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:iconfavoriteartman:
FavoriteArtMan Featured By Owner Feb 27, 2014
What about the VF-17?  And did you happen to see a WWII Corsair?
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:iconcomradeloganov:
comradeloganov Featured By Owner Feb 27, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
What do you mean, did I happen to see a WWII Corsair?  I've seen many Corsairs at museums and airshows.  VF-17 was disbanded by the time of the F-14, so this is VF-84, one of 3 squadrons to bear the Jolly Roger markings.  It was originally formed around a nucleus of VF-17 veterans.
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:iconfavoriteartman:
FavoriteArtMan Featured By Owner Feb 27, 2014
You'll forgive me if I was trying to refer to your gallery, sir.
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:iconcomradeloganov:
comradeloganov Featured By Owner Feb 27, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Ah, you had me confused.  I have a lot of photos, including a few of the Corsair, the best of which you already found.  As for the profiles, they're all of "what if" aircraft.
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:iconronin201:
Ronin201 Featured By Owner Dec 23, 2013
I can definitely see the Mirage influence, as well as a little bit of the F-8 in the design (especially the way the Sidewinders are mounted).
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:iconcomradeloganov:
comradeloganov Featured By Owner Dec 24, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Definitely!  It was a combination of the two families, certainly.
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:icongraphitedriver001:
Graphitedriver001 Featured By Owner Dec 17, 2013
Amazing job there!
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:iconcomradeloganov:
comradeloganov Featured By Owner Dec 17, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Thanks, very much!  I have another on in Wolfpack markings, as well, did you see that?
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:icongraphitedriver001:
Graphitedriver001 Featured By Owner Dec 18, 2013
Yes very very nice. I did a few custom markings on anF4U Corsair as well as more recognizable paint scheme on an F8 Corsair when it flew the Jolly Rogers.
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:iconcomradeloganov:
comradeloganov Featured By Owner Dec 18, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Very neat.  I like the 2 seat Corsair variant you came up with.  Have you checked out the Beyond the Sprues forum?  You would probably like the What If community there.
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:icongraphitedriver001:
Graphitedriver001 Featured By Owner Dec 18, 2013
Hmm I'll check out that forum. Thanks on the 2 seater. I read up and there WAS a 2 seat variant but the canopy was very constricted by the canopy framework so I chose to go with the more open bubble look of the 1 seater.
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:iconcomradeloganov:
comradeloganov Featured By Owner Dec 18, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Indeed, here's a shot of it.
www.corsair82.com/corsair/seat…
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:icondanyboz:
danyboz Featured By Owner Sep 13, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
I like all your "What If" designs... but this one is particularly impressive ! ;)
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:iconcomradeloganov:
comradeloganov Featured By Owner Sep 13, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Thanks!  I'm glad you like it!  It was fun, but challenging to do.
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:icondanyboz:
danyboz Featured By Owner Sep 20, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
I guess, I also made a fictive fighter and liveries are really fun to do ;)
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:iconcomradeloganov:
comradeloganov Featured By Owner Sep 20, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Well, this design really existed.  It just never made it to prototype form.
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:iconfighterman35:
fighterman35 Featured By Owner Sep 13, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
WoW that's neat. I'm looking forward to see more profiles of this plane. 
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:iconcomradeloganov:
comradeloganov Featured By Owner Sep 13, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Thanks!  More are coming, but these take a little while, so it will be a bit.  Probably a few weeks time.
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:icontophe2:
Tophe2 Featured By Owner Sep 12, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Nice design (both of LTV and you), too bad this was before the new rule building 2 competitors to test...
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:iconcomradeloganov:
comradeloganov Featured By Owner Sep 12, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Yeah, though the McDD design actually placed second.  One thing about the Vought, it was probably the lowest risk design because of their experience with the TF30 and the development work done on the Mirage G and transferred to Vought.  Also, while the Tomcat would prove itself to be a fantastic aircraft, everyone conveniently forgets all the trouble that it encountered in development.  For the first few years there, they were falling out of the sky due to a myriad of issues, including the first prototype on its second flight due to hydraulic issues, the bane of Grumman's aircraft designs.
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:icontalos56:
talos56 Featured By Owner Sep 12, 2013
Could you imagine them trying to build all five designs for a fly-off, though?  ;)

imageshack.us/a/img809/4659/cu…
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:icontophe2:
Tophe2 Featured By Owner Sep 12, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yes, I imagine they would build all contenders, pilot-less, 1/10th scale (then 1/72nd for us modellers)... Rather cheap and very pleasant, somehow... :)
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:icontank50us:
Tank50us Featured By Owner Sep 12, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
I imagine that this is one of the Tomcat concepts?
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:icontalos56:
talos56 Featured By Owner Sep 12, 2013
It is one of the competitors for the VFX competition. In this case the LTV entry to it. Grumman won with the design we know today as the Tomcat (G-303).
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:iconcomradeloganov:
comradeloganov Featured By Owner Sep 12, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
It was actually a competitor to the Grumman entry that eventually became the Tomcat.  It was heavily inspired by France's Mirage G.
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:icontank50us:
Tank50us Featured By Owner Sep 12, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
heh, well, ya learn something new every day... I honestly never knew this design even existed.
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