theindenturedplier's avatar

I expected longer than two years. most People start making lump-form sculptures, but you have very well established structural frames in your larger works. Your smaller work is very jewelry-like. you've basically skipped wrapping and went straight to weaving. I have a few modified pairs of pliers that i use for weaving that I think you may want to copy. they consist of a small pair of bent nose, a pair of needle nose, and another longer bent nose pair. the modification is the same on all, at the base of the maw, where the cutters can often be found, I have taken a round file and cut out a portion of each plier jaw so that there is a large hole in the base of them. this opening allows the sculptor to reach around the structural frame work and grasp the weave wire. I’ll try and get a picture to show you if you are interested.  as far as the rules I follow, there are a lot of them. the biggest rule I would emphasize is to make every line count and serve a purpose, if you lazily smoosh wire together, it shows. Secondly is to have the proper tool set.  when I teach a class, I teach the five basic types of tools: long-nose, round nose, side cutters, locking pliers, and files. personally, I have about twenty different types of pliers, and of those types, several subsets. I also stress absolutely no rubber grips on any pliers. Rubber increases friction, friction increases pain and blisters, pain and blisters increase the amount of work not done. I also insist on quality tools, this is simply because such work is hard on the hands and quality tools reduce force and effort needed to achieve your work. In short better tools save your hands and elbows. Since you are already working with frames I would suggest keeping in mind your lines of symmetry. Try to keep the orientation of your connections in the same direction so that they will line up and ultimately reduce bulking up in small tight areas. Also I would suggest trying aluminum wire as its also resistant to corrosion. I use steel, copper, and aluminum and generally just put a coat of clear acrylic sealer on my pieces, painting achieves the same protective effect.  I noticed a lot of your gauges seem to be around 18 – 24 gauge. You should try using thicker and thinner types of wire to see how they feel to you. it may seem really obvious but larger wire serves better for frame work and smaller wire is better suited for decoration. Of course, as you use different types of metal you may find need of different tools. Large wire-large pliers, small wire=small pliers. 

nonameJapjap's avatar
Thanks for the advice, wow your teaching wire sculpture, do you have many students?yes would like to see your modified pairs of pliers. Your correct i only use 18-24 gauge, nextym will try using diff gauges,
theindenturedplier's avatar
I'v e taught a handful of classes through local galleries. maybe 20 or so students.