Comment History
Zheyno's avatar

So if the terms changed, you would accept it? But, it wasn’t to spark controversy, it would be forgotten like most novels. To the author’s credit, perhaps making the story controversial was to drive attention, and leave a mark on history.

drivanmoffitt's avatar

I'm not suggesting that at all, it would still be horrible either way, regardless of rather or not they're real groups. As for the book, the writer clearly wanted people to read it, and the few who have tried to carry out some the things it describe, the Oklahoma city bombing is one such example.

Zheyno's avatar

I doubt Oklahoma City Bombing had any to do with the book and more out of revenge for the Waco Massacre. And plus this line you’re drawing includes stories such as “V for Vendetta”

drivanmoffitt's avatar

No, I mention because Timothy McVeigh was inspired by it and the book described an event very similar to what happened in the real world...


"As he drove toward the Murrah Federal Building in the Ryder truck, McVeigh carried with him an envelope containing pages from The Turner Diaries – a fictional account of white supremacists who ignite a revolution by blowing up the FBI headquarters at 9:15 one morning using a truck bomb." - from Wikipedia article on the event. Very curious why McVeigh would take pages of the book with him when he did his attack.

Zheyno's avatar

It might have been Feds planting evidence trying to deter attention away from Waco. These are the same people who have, time and time again played dirty to advance an neoliberal capitalist agenda.

Besides McVeigh's anger for the government came from how he was treated in the military and after, not from overtly racial reasons.

drivanmoffitt's avatar

Sure they did, if that's the case then explain the other Neo-Nazis (one of which being the Order, a real-life Neo-Nazi group who murdered a Jewish radio host) who used the book as an influence, face it, its' a Neo-Nazi "book" (a very pisspoor book at that) that has sense inspired, and the FBI was caught off guard by this attack but the nature of it did remind them of the book in question.

Zheyno's avatar

Even if it is the case, then religious books would carry the same stigma of promoting “evil”. But they don’t, unless being labeled so by a state or state backed institution.


If one cannot draw a line without making exceptions, then should be no line. For artistic expression differs from one individual to another and can only be appreciated through self-discovery.

drivanmoffitt's avatar

I get that, but religious texts are often open for interpretation, that's why we have so many different sects within every major religion in the world, there's not that much room for interpretation, especially with the writer's open Neo-Nazi beliefs and his... well... hatried of literally anyone who doesn't share his beliefs or looks like him, I mean, he clearly hates Neo-Confederates, KKK and other supremacists largely because they're not Neo-Nazis, and I got that from his book which is expressed via his written Neo-Nazi organization, known as... the Organization... Neo-Nazis aren't that creative when it comes to names apparently... Especially a Neo-Nazi who hates everyone.

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