Peacefroggie's avatar
[link]

^ ^
READ THE ARTICLE!


This thing here is big news to me, for one I'm shocked that anyone was allowed to do such a study. But for two, this only reinforces something real important about brain chemistry. The experiences that we have and the way in which we perceive things are dictated by the distribution of chemicals in our brains. "You could be a piece of fish, or a bit of old cheese," as Ebenezer Scrooge might say. The only difference between seeing a vegetable garden house and family, and the divine collective unity of all creation, is eating a little fuckin slightly-toxic mushroom.

And look at what these people, who are apparently just regular folks, say:

"Many of the 36 volunteers rated their reaction to a single dose of the drug, called psilocybin, as one of the most meaningful or spiritually significant experiences of their lives. Some compared it to the birth of a child or the death of a parent."

"most of the volunteers said the experience had changed them in beneficial ways, such as making them more compassionate, loving, optimistic and patient. Family members and friends said they noticed a difference, too."

"Two-thirds called their reaction to psilocybin one of the five top most meaningful experiences of their lives. On another measure, one-third called it the most spiritually significant experience of their lives, with another 40 percent ranking it in the top five."

"experience included such things as a sense of pure awareness and a merging with ultimate reality, a transcendence of time and space, a feeling of sacredness or awe, and deeply felt positive mood like joy, peace and love. People say "they can't possibly put it into words," Griffiths said."


Now I know what these people experienced, having maybe eaten a few magic mushrooms a time or two myself...but I'll be honest, seeing it on CNN sent big fuckin shivers right down my spine and made all the nerves in my body tingle.
mykel's avatar
the simple fact is that no one NEEDS to take drugs like shrooms, acid, or DMT, or anything else you can think of. it is a choice you make, and it is not a shortcut to or from anything. as modern human beings, living in the overly developed, desensitized, superficial society that we live in, we are actually detached from reality thanks to such a large majority of what we come in contact with every day being unnatural material, whether we're talking about tangible technology or the psychological effects the said technology has on us. my friend just told me today about his personal experience with shrooms, and made me understand it much more clearly. he said that while he was tripping, things that should not bother us but do for some irrational reason, did not even enter his mind as negative things. for example, he was at a nature preserve, and there were mosquitoes and other bugs all over the place and all over him and his friend, and instead of being annoyed or disgusted by them as we normally are, he was absolutely fine with it. he felt completely at one with them, as we should be, if you think about it- we are, after all, made of the same natural matter. humans have this sense that we are somehow above nature, or more advanced than nature, cleaner than nature, in some way not 100% natural. I'm not explaining it nearly as well as he did, but if you really think about it, that is an incredibly desirable thing to be able to see so clearly and feel and experience. the real connection that made me see the significance of what he was saying was, if you think about it, when we were less intellectually developed (say somewhere in between caveman and modern humans) we were definitely in that same state of mind which my friend got to experience. the way we are now is NOT completely naturally, and is only getting further and further removed as time goes on from what our natural perception of the world and ourselves should be, would be, and has been. so, think of a drug such as shrooms as a way to break through our flawed, overcomplicated, detached modern lives and get in touch with what actually matters to the rest of the universe. not as something that we use to detach ourselves from reality, because it is quite the opposite.
RealityUnfiltered's avatar
Why does it matter if its an old thread? the topic is still interesting.
DrinkTheSun's avatar
yeah they're fun. what i love is seeing the similar conclusions buddhist monks meditating and silly kids tripping on shrooms come to. i'm sure that the buddhist monks having the epiphanies through the power of their own mind and not the influence of foreign chemicals are much wiser, but it's still fun to see the similarities.
OuroborosCobra's avatar
Every time you revive an old thread God kills a baby. Think of the babies.
DrinkTheSun's avatar
someone else did it! it wasn't me. i didn't know it was old. it was on the front page and i am bad at looking at dates.

but babies won't convince me not to, for future reference.
MaskInfusion's avatar
Trivia: Cary Grant took LSD under a pychiatrists supervision. He loved it.
Peacefroggie's avatar
On his deathbed, Aldous Huxley had his doctor inject him with pure liquid LSD.
MaskInfusion's avatar
fourteenthstar's avatar
I'm shocked that anyone was allowed to do such a study How so?

Drugs considered 'recreational' now a deep routed history in experiments used to identify the effect on the mind, particularly in relationship counselling. Check out the history of MDMA development where it was frequently used in psychotherapy and person centred counselling.

I think we need to move away from demonising substances which used correctly and under proper supervision might actually open up people's minds.
Peacefroggie's avatar
Well let's consider for a moment how backwards and crazy the American government is on the matter of illegal drugs and drug research...now think about the Federal Government actually FUNDING a study like this...that it happened is incredible. I'm surprised the DEA didn't raid John Hopkins.
fourteenthstar's avatar
allyhodges's avatar
Sounds really interesting, but I'd probably be too chicken to try it, I'm really afraid of side effects and I've aquaintanced with people who have died from stimulants like speed.
Ljudska's avatar
No matter how many medical studies there are proving the contrary, some people will never be convinced that psychedelics (or scheduled psychoactive drugs of any kind, really) are anything short of evil.
SLOShooter's avatar
Only cause of the stigma surrounding them. tattoes used to have the same steretype but now they're almost acceptable.

One day, it could change.
rubbe's avatar
hmm... seems intresting would like too try it? but it seems risky.
Peacefroggie's avatar
[link]

Read this article, despite the medical/therapeutic attention paid to mushrooms, the US government still actively prosecutes known users and promoters of magic mushrooms.
empchang's avatar
this is really kind of old news.

there has been an ongoing study of psilocyban in north carolina for some time now.
Peacefroggie's avatar
Well of course it's old news, people have been eating mushrooms in religious rituals for thousands of years. Hell Tim Leary only got all crazy enlightened-like after he went to some kind of mushroom ceremony on vacation in Mexico. This is the first time I've seen a study about em on CNN though.
Demi-Urge's avatar
"The experiences that we have and the way in which we perceive things are dictated by the distribution of chemicals in our brains."

*Your brain is electro-chemical in nature. You can also produce altered states with disruptions or sychronization with EM fields.
Panpanther's avatar
i ate mushrooms for the first time about 14 months ago, and it was great. since then i've done it 3 more times and each time was fantastic, although the last two were significantly less profound.

i think it's a terriffic "drug" that should be decriminalized.
MaskInfusion's avatar
I would say that the biggest benefit of psychedelics is that they show the person what their own mind is capable of. The challenge is then to tune the mind toward that goal through a spiritual discipline.

It's like the differance between climbing a mountain and taking a helicopter to the top. The climber learns the terrain.
beta3's avatar
So THAT'S how one becomes a liberal! It's so clear now. I just KNEW that there had to be some sort of drug involved in altering the natural state of the human psyche so drastically, and they finally found it. Congratulations to them :)
Peacefroggie's avatar
Mmmm the irony is delicious :)
originalnasadude's avatar
I KNOW you are some sort of overly patriotic conservative nutjob. But hey! I am too! So it's all good! :)
beta3's avatar
You can't be overly-patriotic anyway. Whoever came up with that one is incredibly ignorant.

Seriously, though... What does George Washington growing hemp have to do with me cracking a joke about liberals eating shrooms? I don't get it.
originalnasadude's avatar
I don't get it either. OMG....GET YOUR HANDS OFF ME YOU DAMNED DIRTY APE! :-O
foxenigma's avatar
Ann Coulter fan or what? In general conversations, it's considered rude to mock political ideologies unless you're sure to be with those who agree with you. And for your probably patriotic information, Georges Washington was a known smocker and grower of hemp. Read his diaries. :)
beta3's avatar
What does hemp have to do with magic mushrooms?
foxenigma's avatar
it contains thc, a psychoactive substance. Hallucinogen mushrooms also contain psychoactive substances.
beta3's avatar
I really don't understand what George Washington growing hemp has to do with anything. Are you assuming that I'm some sort of overly-patriotic conservative nutjob?
foxenigma's avatar
I must admit that you sounded like one, but I would be more than glad to be proven wrong :)
If you aren't, well I'm sorry I treated you like one.
globalninja's avatar
The consumption of psycodelics should always be carfully thought out and concidered.
Please people reasurch about any drug you are going/thinking of tring. And when taking psycodelics make sure you are in a positive frame of mind and a place where you feel safe. They tap into your subconsious so if your in a bad spot in life, the trip will reflect that and you could really scare the shit out of yourself, or possibly do permanet damage. I've seen people freak out because they did not respect their own mind, feelings and most importantly the drugs they took.

Drugs are fun and can beinfit those that take them, but they can also damage those that take them.
Remember drugs are not life, nor a substitute for it.

RESPECT WHAT YOU USE when you don't is when you get into trouble, too many find that out the hard way.
Shidaku's avatar
theres no real way to actually measure what they're experiancing, or the relative importantness of what they're basing the argument that 'shrooms are great against. In short, the experiment was not scientifcly accruate, since any dumbfuck who knows two cents about the brain can tell you that various chemicals can mess up the delicate balance of chemiclas that already exist in your brain causeing your percpetions to go all wonky.

this dosent prove that shrooms are good or some magical path to enlightenment, it just means that a bunch of voluenteers got to do drugs and then said it rocked.
Peacefroggie's avatar
In psychology it's not always possible to do the really strictly scientific sort of tests you can do in the other sciences. Often you have to rely on a subject's description of what they are going through. Like say someone has a brain injury that alters their behaviour, you'd definitely have to take into account their description of their own mental state as well as look at what had physically changed in the brain. In this case, a group consensus as to what the experience felt like subjectively is enough to conclude that, as the study does, that drugs can cause powerful "mustical experiences."
Shidaku's avatar
true, but we all know that 'shrooms contain chemicals that affect your brain, and the resulting experiances you feel are caused by the brain activity triggered by the change in chemical levels. I dont recall if actual scans of brain activity were done in this study, but I feel they are necessary.

If this drug does indeed activate a "positive" portion of the brain, then it should be made known what part of the brain that is, so that perhaps we can engineer something that is less toxic, but just as effective, and perhaps do some good.
Peacefroggie's avatar
Sure, we know to some degree what goes on in the brain with psychedelics...they cause the brain to release an excess of serotonin. Obviously there are other factors involved which are less understood due to the 40-year research ban. But the guy who did the John Hopkins study wants to do more research including MRI scans, etc., as soon as he can get government approval and more funding. Could be tricky though...FOX News already has a headline reporting that psilocybin causes a high that lasts for months :)
evolvearth's avatar
Not exactly a fair assessment. The entire purpose is for people to have positive experiences. Human behavior is predictable at a certain point, and professionals, while not at 100% accuracy, generally are good at picking out the liars. If the volunteers claimed to have positive experiences, then what is wrong with relying on that data? While positive experiences are relative to people, they are mostly similar than they are different. If more studies are conducted, more results come in. If the volunteers continue to praise the effects of the drug, then that adds to the credibility.

I think it is more hopeful than realistic to assume that human experiences cannot be quantified in any meaningful way. We're still products of nature and are far more similar than different. Humans are predictable creatures, and I think that grinds of the nerves of many. Therapy and medicine seem to be pretty effective because of studies like these.
Shidaku's avatar
perhaps, but I still think that without actual brain chemical level testing the results are questionable. Maybe I'm asking for them to cut open people's heads and see what's ticking. Perhaps a cat scan of the active brain areas during the experiances and then their responses afterward to see what areas activate, and why pleasureable, instead of negative experiances are brought about.

But more to the point is that I have never liked the idea of chemicla use, be them illegial or legal ones to improve the way you see the world. There are people who need drugs to make their brain function in the same ways as everyone else, but I dont think that because "life sucks" or that the world is harsh should be an excuse to screw with your mind in order to avoid it. Avoidance is no better than apathy and apathy is bad.

Also, it brings up too many mental images of Brave New World where everyone does drugs and nobody cares whats going on cause everyone is "happy" all the time. There's actually a song about that in Secret of NIMH 2, relating to the electroshock therapy that was so prevalent in the past, it was a twisted and creepy song, especially for an animated show.
Peacefroggie's avatar
Yes, except in Brave New World the drug they took ditracted them from what was heppening...psychedelics turn you inwards and force you to reflect on yourself. I don't see how they would possibly act like in Brave New World, they're too profound and difficult and frightening. Huxley wrote Brave New World early on in his life, but he wrote Island later on, after he'd experimented with Mescaline...and it offers a much more positive take on the possibilities of drug use in society.
Shidaku's avatar
Maybe he just did it to show there were different possibilities. Youd have to ask him if drug use improved him. As you said, testimony is about all you've got to go on.

I wouldnt say that all drugs affect all people the same ways, which is one of the main problems with relying on tesitmony, it would be better to see how the brain was actually reacting.
Peacefroggie's avatar
Well that's why you ask a wide variety of people...then you can establish common elements in their testimony, which makes for reasonably convincing evidence. Combine that with some MRI imaging or some sort of brain scan, and you've got some seriously good scientific information to base your assumptions on, right?
Shidaku's avatar
yes that sounds pretty correct.
disintegration's avatar
It's interesting that they're analyzing this stuff properly, but it's rather dodgy because the psychedelic experience can't be measured by any mean. If they measured their brain activity during the trip and got information on how the drug affects the brain, good. Otherwise, all they got was a bunch of anecdotal evidence that is next to useless for proper medical/scientifical investigation.

"most of the volunteers said the experience had changed them in beneficial ways, such as making them more compassionate, loving, optimistic and patient.

Most people say the same thing after having any kind of experience that made them ponder about their life. For example, a major car crash that put them close to death.
MaskInfusion's avatar
There are some human experiences that are not quantifiable nor subject to inspection in a petri dish.
Shidaku's avatar
then such experiences should not be used in a scientific study.
MaskInfusion's avatar
Try to think of the mushroom experience like the Matrix; no one can tell you about it, you have to go through it yourself.

[link]

This is a link to all you need to know about Terrence Mckenna and mushrooms.

I encourage the curious to approach the experience with a serious mind, rather than as a party favor (at least initially.)

Fast at least 4-6 hours beforehand. If you chew up those foul-tasting shrooms with pure grape juice, it is much less awful.

You should start to :yawn: in about 45-55 minutes, which will herald the oncoming of the experience.:floating:

As with any psychedelic, be in a safe, comfortable place :stereo: with at least one very close friend :teddy: when you don't have any appointments for the next 18 hours. The length of the experience itself will vary, but you want a nice long cool down period afterwards with no responsibilities. Have some wholesome food available afterwards, as you won't want to eat during the trip (count on at 3-4 hours at least) and you will be hungry later.

DO NOT TAKE ANYTHING ELSE with the shrooms, especially ALCOHOL.:skullbones:

As you decompress and come down toward the end, a little :weed: can be relaxing and even extend the experience somewhat.

Set up your trip space. If you are an artist, have your pencils and pad ready. Everyone should at least try to write a few things down during the trip. A trip guide friend can help to remind you.

Compared to LSD, which is often described as having and "electric" quality, I have often heard the shroom trip described as "creamy." It is certainly a much gentler trip.

The only instance I ever heard of a person having a "bad trip" on shrooms was a girl who was asthmatic, and had an attack without her inhaler available.

Shrooms are a chemical key to unlocking something inside you. Don't blame the key for the contents. If you don't like what you see when you look within yourself, you will not like mushrooms and you will HATE LSD.:analprobestare:

As to the validity of the experience, it is without a doubt mystical, though invoked through the chemical in the mushroom. It opens a door that would take most people years or even a lifetime of a spiritual discipline :pray:such as meditation. For those who are not ready for it, the experience can be terrible.:sunnysideup: Such a thing is akin to tearing a butterfly from the chrysalis before it's time. But for those who are ready to go to the next level, the experience is life transforming.:love: :heart: :butterflytwo:

In preparation for a shroom trip, I would workout and run, do 45 minutes of Hatha Yoga to relax my body, and then at least an hour of zen meditation.:meditate: I have also take shroom and spent time in an isolation (flotation) tank. But that's another story…:meditation:
disintegration's avatar
So, basically... it's a mystical experience, but only for those who are predisposed into that line of thought?
Peacefroggie's avatar
I have four hits of acid hidden away, what do you reccomend I do with em oh zen master :)
SLOShooter's avatar
I think it's great research.

I personally feel that it's completely natural to want, perhaps even need, mental "excursions". It's completely up to the individual user as to how they go about it. If they feel that the mental benifits are worth the possible mental and physical side effects, I say let em do it. If it's not their scene, cool, they won't do it anyway.
foxenigma's avatar
For ancient people that made use of entheogen plants, reality was only what you perceived, so what we today call 'drug-induced hallucinations' were a reality for them. I believe that when you are ready, the experience comes to you and becomes meaningful, for instance, I had been smoking marijuana for erh...quite a while then, and one day, out of nowhere, I felt something which is perhaps too personal to really get into.
A person in this thread said that it was sad that people had to use hallucinogens to have a meaningful experience. I have to admit that I only partially agree, for me, entheogens are something sacred, and taking them all the time is somewhat an insult "to the plant" (to something sacred). I have had highly spiritual experiences (therefore meaningful) with Salvia Divinorum that changed me, but I did not feel the need to repeat the experience, I was already changed. People who would take drugs all the time wouldn't change, because they'd use it was a crutch where they wouldn't need any.
druid69's avatar
I like a good buzz as much as the next person, but, when a news service starts running stories about halucinagenic substances providing spiritual experiences I have to question whether the use of that term isn't one that might be better put aside entirely. It strikes chords of Pavlov with me, provide a stimuli and invoke instant spiritualism. Sure it mimics The doors of perception theme nicely, but, that wasn't sustainable for many people past the 60's and may have caused many people to question wether spiritualism itself as a concept wasn't just another illusion entirely. Its worked for some, but, seems to end up being ammunition for their detractors.
Peacefroggie's avatar
"Instead of going there every once in a while, I choose to work on being there all the time, without the aid of mother nature, or problems from the authorities. I was thinking about things and I came up with this example: I was in India for six weeks engaged in intense spiritual practices, meditation, chanting, study of scripture and yoga. The result of my practice was about the same of smoking a jay of the best Cali weed, the difference being that the high I got from smoking only lasted a few hours and I found myself right back where I started from -- with a little added frustration because that feeling was gone. The high I get from spiritual practices lifts my consciousness up and gives me the knowledge and experience to keep it up there."
-Ricky Williams :)
druid69's avatar
:D Apparently those spiritual practices weren't quite enough to keep him from being fired from pro football though. It kind of illustrates my point.
Peacefroggie's avatar
Naw man he's playing for Toronto now, I saw that quote in a Globe & Mail article.
druid69's avatar
Thats cool. I wonder if they care all that much about substance use in the management there at Toronto? Maybe I should move there. I did spend a week there years ago. Great place.
foxenigma's avatar
"wether spiritualism itself as a concept wasn't just another illusion entirely"
To someone that has experienced certain things trough entheogens, things are only limitless perception, some the whole "illusion" thing is not appliable for them, or, put a bit more precisely, they don't believe in it or find it irrelevant.

"Its worked for some, but, seems to end up being ammunition for their detractors."
Mainly because the experience is so personal, it can't really be talked about. You could describe it, but in the end, it remains all to you.
druid69's avatar
While I won't disagree with you on most of it, my point was that I don't believe its a true path to spiritualism for most people that might try it. I believe that many people in the psychedellic 60's tried this path, many of them may have felt the spiritual connection, but, not many of them sustained their experience for life. For those, they later questioned any real gain afforded themselves by their experience and thus may have rejected entirely any relevance to themselves or others. I believe that many of those individuals became jaded and an impediment to others seeking.
foxenigma's avatar
You're right, most of them didn't sustain their experience and then called that a mistake. A lot of people in the 60's just tried it to be cool and in with the gang, and not out of a desire for personal evolution.
druid69's avatar
Perhaps a key to sucess is really having a desire to know rather than in trying a substance just because you've heard about it?
foxenigma's avatar
I don't think that there's an exact key, it's just a matter of being ready and doing the right thing. It might seem non-sense for others, but I certainly feel that it's not everyone that's fit for everything. I'm right for Salvia, or perhaps Salvia is right for me, whichever, I may not get anything from something else. I've had a meaningful experience with Marijuana only once, all it gave me afterward was headaches. And I don't want to sound like a government sellout, but yes, we should do what is legal as much as we can, it's stupid to just run for trouble. For instance, Salvia is legal in Canada, but not in the US. The big key in this matter is especially not to do anything stupid, which I strongly advice to everyone.

I have to admit that most people who try something just because their friends do or told him to is not very likely to get something out of it, but life has taught me that you just never know... ;-)
MaskInfusion's avatar
Research Terrence McKenna before taking shrooms.

If you've never taken shrooms and you are pontificating about them, just stfu as you are clueless.
Peacefroggie's avatar
MikeyLove's avatar
What about Terrence McKenna? You forgot to make a point.
mentalstatement's avatar
thats great.. now where do i get some?
Mixedpie's avatar
Well, you know shamen and stuff in ancient (and some modern-day cultures that aren't in the big industrialized world) tribes and stuff used to get high for their big spiritual stuff. And you know the oracle at Delphi? She was high on some vapors coming up from the floor of her cave...

Still doesn't make it good for your brain.

Oh! And chocolate's got a drug in it too... makes your brain release endorphins (I think).

Still wouldn't wanna eat a toxic fungus myself. That whole "euphoric" feeling the people were talking about might have been the toxin's special way of killing you. I never understood the train of thought that goes: this is toxic... lets eat it and get high!
blue-bella-donna's avatar
uh..the oracle at delphi was not high...she ate some laurel leaves.

...when was the last time you hear about people tripping on laurel leaves?
Mixedpie's avatar
I heard that her cave had some interesting vapors comming up from the ground.

And isn't laurel toxic?
blue-bella-donna's avatar
Sibyl sat on a tripod over a crevace in the floor, which led down to a hot spring. There would have been a lot of steam, and maybe mineral salts, but I doubt that would have been enough to induce the trance-like states the delphinian oracles are credited with. Other than that, she would eat laurel leaves. I have read that the ancient romans used to eat laurel leaves as part of tradtional cuisine; toxicity would depend on the species of laurel I guess.

Sibyl was suppossed to have been chosen by Apollo, and it is from him that the Sibyline visions are supposed to originate. *shrug*
Peacefroggie's avatar
Well toxic is a funny thing, I mean, water can be toxic if you drink enough of it. Your body creates its own toxic substances anyways. And people ate this sort of thing before they even knew what toxins were, just because the experience was so intense and amazing. Me, I don't know for sure whether or not it's good for your brain, but I KNOW it's good for your soul.
RealityUnfiltered's avatar
Exactly, good for the soul.

BTW is your signature text from Trailer park boys? Lmfao, i love it!
lamp-shade's avatar
If by soul you mean your personality, the thing that makes you you, your perceptions, creativity, thoughts et cetera... by saying "I don't know for sure whether or not it's good for your brain" that makes the rest of your sentence an oxymoron. Your brain is where your soul is at.

If you mean some spiritual religious type of soul... well I don't see how shrooms will help that. All Gods that I know do not recommend pyschedelic drugs to help worship them.
Peacefroggie's avatar
Right then, I'll clarify. Is it good for you physically in the way that a salmon steak and a spinach salad is? No. Does it damage the brain physically? I don't know and there is insufficient research on this to say definitevely. Is it good for you mentally, is it a beneficial influence on your personality and your consciousness? Does it improve your outlook on life? In a majority of cases, yes.
lamp-shade's avatar
I understand what you're saying. It was just the way you said it, it sounded kind of stupid to me.
Hey, I'm pedantic. And now you sound informed and correct.
spiritwolf77's avatar
The argument that "anything can be toxic" isn't really a good one for making people think something is safe because it ignores the level of toxicity. Water is only toxic when consumed at quantities more than 10 liters per day. Whereas other things, like say...cyanide...are toxic in amounts less than a teaspoon.

Not critiquing your drug habits here, because while I personally oppose them because of the dangers...I say to each his own. People are free to do what they want to their own bodies.

I just wanted to correct the mistaken analogy.
mentalstatement's avatar
i think pure water is the only thing that does not contain any toxins or chemicals.
spiritwolf77's avatar
Aye, but if you consume more than about 10 liters per day you risk water intoxication. Sodium levels drop, the body attempts to correct the imbalance, the brain's water balance is upset, and seizures are typically the result.

Water is wonderful, but like everything else, even it needs to be consumed in moderation.
mentalstatement's avatar
Thats why they invented Gaterade. Anyways, one cannot consume that amount of water under normal conditions. They would have to be severely dehydrated as a result of illness or excessive heat. As such, its not actually the water that will harm the person, but rather the other chemicals in the body which might be missing or built up to high levels.
spiritwolf77's avatar
I'm sure drinking too much Gatorade has it's problems as well. Isn't that stuff packed with sugar?

I don't think it's impossible for someone to consume that amount of water under normal conditions, I think it's just unlikely that they'll do it. And actually, no it's not necessarily the other chemicals due to other problems. Regardless of what else is going on in the body, if more than 10 liters are consumed, it will screw up the brain water levels and cause seizures.
mentalstatement's avatar
gatorade can disolve the teeth..

anyways i dont agree about the water. Im sure if they mix in the right minirals it will be fine. After all, water takes a certain amount of time to go through your system, you cant just keep drinking it and not get full. This process is only bupassed when the body is under stress from hear or whatever.
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Peacefroggie's avatar
Yeah but if you drink too much it waters down your blood, and the lack of nutrients can be potentially fatal.
spiritwolf77's avatar
Not actually a result of "lack of nutrients." Dilluting the blood does not destroy nutrients in your body. It simply causes your sodium vs. water levels to be unbalanced. The body needs to maintain a certain sodium/water balance to keep things running properly by facilitating the absorption of water into cells, so it needs to correct any imbalances. Water ends up rushing into brain cells which causes seizures.
moofart-moof's avatar
They want to use it to treat depressed people...

ok :|
Peacefroggie's avatar
I feel more certain of my place in the universe and am generally happier and more satisfied with my life since I ate some mushrooms a few years back, though I wasn't exactly depressed. I think it would be a better treatment than all the wierd synthetic drugs they give people now...certainly mushrooms do not have the hideous side effects of many drugs used to treat depression.
Eman333's avatar
What was your experience after eating the mushrooms?
Peacefroggie's avatar
It was three and some years ago, but I remember it real clear...first of all, light was brighter, and I noticed things that otherwise I would just glance past, like the veins on leaves or the dust floating in a beam of light, and it all seemed to hold incredible spiritual significance, it all seemed to imply some deeper meaning. This sort of feeling intensified...while objects remained distinct, it was like I knew instinctively that they were all in fact part of some greater whole, and all interconnected. I totally lost sense of time. I was sitting on a bench beside a lake with some people, looking out across the lake, but I was seeing things like the pyramids being built, futuristic cities, other solar systems...it was kinda like that movie where there's a kid in a boat with a mosquito on his arm, and it zooms in to all of his cells in his arm, and then out past the whole galaxy, and then back in again, only also back and forward in time, and all at once. I felt like my head would explode.

Then I must have passed some sort of peak, because all those stimuli slowly calmed down and let me relax, it felt kind of like I was landing in a parachute, and I was left feeling like I'd gone through a lifetime of experiences in a few hours. It was amazing, I have to agree with these people in the study, the only things that compare were the last time I saw my grandparents alive, the only time I left North America, and my highschool graduation. It was intense.
Eman333's avatar
Sounds pretty intense. Much different to weed?
globalninja's avatar
totally different, psycodelics cannot be compared to other drugs, well they can but they are far different. Weed stills your mind to a point, its a depressent, like alcohol, speed, extacy, cocaine etc are stimulents, and do as they say. Mushrooms, mesciline and LSD are far more powerful, they open new ways of thinking far and above that of other drugs. Plus you get powerfull visulals which other drugs don't provide to the same extent. Psycodelics can offer people alot, but should be teated with utmost care, if your thinking of tring them, reasurch them first (as you should any drug) and make sure you are in a happy frame of mind, and have been for a period of time, like all week. Psycodelics tap into your subconsious, I've seen people freak out badly becuase they where not mentally ready.
Eman333's avatar
Iv'e never been a hardcore drug user. I did a bit of pot many years ago, thats about it. I rember becoming extremely paranoid (at one point I convinced myself there was a monster in the bushes in my backyard.).

I don't think I would ever try mushrooms. Definatly not without some research.
But anyway, was just curious as to the difference. Thanks for your info :)
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Gazzaf1's avatar
Rather sad that a person has to take a mind altering drug to have a "meaningful experience"
Panpanther's avatar
it's sad only if a person HAS to, but it's great if a person can CHOOSE to.
SLOShooter's avatar
People have been using drugs since the begining of time to have mental "excursions" from reality.

To suggest that it's anything but natural is well, to me, un-natural
Gazzaf1's avatar
I see it as a crutch for people who don't want to deal with reallity.
evolvearth's avatar
Drugs are responsible in keeping our sanity. We have medical drugs that help us deal with pain, which is merely an interpretation of a stimulus in our brain. We have drugs that make us less anxious in social situations such as alcohol. We have drugs that keep us more alert and attentive such as caffeine and nicotine. We have more medical drugs that help treat people who suffer with severe depression, hallucinations, mania, that are too difficult or impossible to treat with therapy--schizophrenia being impossible.

You'll find it extremely hard to find an individual who doesn't use some sort of drug. I think it's unfair to judge people because they need some external help with their situation. People go to their family and friends for help dealing with reality instead of turning inwards, and this is normal. However, those people are external influences. Drugs are also external influences, but are viewed as something immoral or it's viewed as the easy, lazy way out. I hope that someday psilocybin and LSD are used in mental health treatment because they're much safer than the drugs already out there to help them if administered properly. Lithium is often used in those who have bipolar, and regular blood work must be taken in order to prevent lithium toxicity. Antipsychotics, which are used to treat people with obsessive-compulsive disorder, bipolar, schizophrenia, et cetera, can cause massive weight gain or weight loss, high cholesterol, heart disease, cataracts, lethargy, and such. One must balance the positives with the negatives when taking these drugs. I, however, decided the negatives were far too severe and quit medicine four years after taking them.

Life is far harder and more stressful because of my decision, but I dropped 55 pounds and gained motivation. I have a really hard time dealing with reality because of my mental health issues, and it makes real life much harder when you have to lie about why you act in certain ways to avoid social discomfort and alienation from those who simply do not understand. The more I research mushrooms, the more I want to try them for therapeutic reasons. The problem is set and setting as mentioned by Timothy Leary. I'd feel much more comfortable if I was adminstered the drug during therapy, but because the legality of the drug and the incident with Timothy Leary post-poned research for many decades, I don't have the option as I should at this point in time. People rather me suffer because they're deadset against drugs. There must be something wrong with me if I have to use them to deal with reality. Well, no shit, right? If I need help dealing with reality and there is a way, then I'm going to take it even if it isn't the tough, manly way to do so. I don't live in a comfortable reality. I'm sick of being paranoid; I'm sick of having unpredictable emotions; I'm sick of the exaggerated stress; I'm sick of having to lie to people; I'm sick of the downswings causing the unstoppable feeling of alienation and isolation. Maybe you lucked out, but the cards I've been dealt with weren't so fair and it's impossible to understand unless you had the proper training or the actual life experience--perhaps with yourself or with a loved one.
Gazzaf1's avatar
I am very aware what medications are in use but there is big difference between taking them for a diagnosed medical condition and taking them for fun.
evolvearth's avatar
The purpose of this study was for use in therapy like what the studies conducted back in the 60's. As for taking them for fun, if they're trying to deal with reality by taking the drug, then it's more for therapy than entertainment, right? Also, what is so wrong with using drugs for fun? Is it any worse than eating for pleasure or playing video games? What about discussing topics such as things on a message board? None of those things result to anything productive, but they entertain us and make life more interesting while we're still alive. In the end, there really is no kind of fun that can't be looked to another as "sad" or "pathetic". The important thing is moderation and control. If you maintain those two qualities, drugs, video games, food, sports, et cetera aren't sad at all.
blue-bella-donna's avatar
perhaps that should be-

taking them for medical reasons,

taking them for fun and

taking them for spiritual reasons.
NeoWarriorCat's avatar
That's beer, which can actually make you forget stuff. :p