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Spirit of Majuba (1881) - Spioenkop (1900)

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A new sun rises over Africa
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© 2020 - 2022 ColorCopyCenter
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menapia's avatar

just a thought, I recently came across a South African alternate history story set during the British Empire -

The Fall of Rorke's Drift. An Alternate History of the Anglo-Zulu War 1879 - By John Leband

Orphydian's avatar

this would be perfect scene if the british side would be a bit more visible dont you think!

ColorCopyCenter's avatar

This is actually one of the more realistic ones as these illustrations go. Very often in a firefight, the two sides would be frustratingly invisible to each other due to the frequent use of smokeless powder rifles. The hand full of CQB engagements were few and far between. Most engagements, especially in the guerilla phase of the war were very similar to most 20th century firefights between opposing forces armed with modern rifles

Orphydian's avatar

maybe adding some other details vague and small on the enemy side idk. I think there should be a way of keeping both the realism and ideal composition 😊

ColorCopyCenter's avatar

I did try to give the distant British figures the distinctive yellowish khaki color and the rounded sun helmet shape

1898Krag's avatar

OUTSTANDING ! Great battle scene !

ColorCopyCenter's avatar

Thanks, glad you like it

1898Krag's avatar

I always like your work. You have a great feel for the Boer War - really shows through your work! I think you could do some GREAT Civil War art. I wish you would do a San Juan Hill (Spanish American War July 1898). What about that F9F Panther shooting down a MIg 15? Carry On !

ColorCopyCenter's avatar

I probably mentioned it before, but Civil War art as a genre is thoroughly saturated and dare I say "played out". I have a great interest in the era and enjoy seeing what others have made in terms of illustrations, but I don't think I'd ever be able to compete. I'm not really one for counting stitches and buttons and reproducing exactly what a man from such and such outfit should have looked like in Spring of '63 vs Winter of '65. I guess that is true for most American military history; people know it forwards and back, can tell you exactly how many buttons and what color for every outfit in every era, and very easily spot when you get it wrong. A big appeal of the Boer history for me as illustrator is that they are not so saturated with popular interest, and the frequent lack of uniform apparel helps to sidestep the stitch counting. I have discovered that it is indeed possible to get bogged down in stitch counting even with Boer stuff since there is a very detailed photographic record if you know where to look, but at least I find it doesn't grate on me as much as something more thoroughly and popularly documented as the Civil War.


I do have an aviation scene in the works that will be the next illustration I finish. Not to disappoint, but it's a kind of airfield scene, so not too much intense aerial action in that respect.


After that I have an idea for a historically accurate illustration of the only Boer armored train / railway gun that ever existed. There are no photos or info of this improvised monster available online, but I found a detailed descriptive passage and two different photos in a book and I'm thinking to use them as reference for a kind of representative composite image. Only hangup right now is that the railway gun was mounted on a nondescript flatcar wagon that is very poorly visible in the photos, and I know next to nothing about South African rolling stock, so it's hard for me to look up better reference photos of the exact same model of wagon to make an accurate depiction of it. I have the locomotive side figured out though, through some educated guesses and a much narrower selection of locomotive engines that would have been available in the right time and place to have been used in the armored train.

1898Krag's avatar

I do understand your pov on the US Civil War. The super detail nit-pickers are often a problem. Had the same issues in CW living History. I'm all for authenticity but I do not worship it. That's why I said I enjoy the Feel of your art. Still The Spanish American War beckons. I have alot of info If I can help. Nevertheless- your airstrip piece souinds great - I'm sure it will ge excellent. You have several others I like very much. I was in the US Infantry in the FRG in the late 70s. So I like the grittiness you project and your scope of things However, I do like F9F Panthers and Centurion tanks. THANKS !! (like your busty girl too)

ColorCopyCenter's avatar

thanks for the kind words. Do you have any recommendations for books on the campaign in the Philippines or the subsequent Insurrection? I think I have an ok knowledge of the naval actions and the land campaign in Cuba, but I'm a bit thin on the Philippines.

1898Krag's avatar

https://youtu.be/mmYk0xxjDDA https://youtu.be/KxYGzwazVwk Here are a couple of vids to get started. The reenactment is only fair but points in the right direction, Books- as always Osprey Spanish -American War and Phillipine Insurrection. The Philippine War by Brian Linn, Uncle Sam's Little Wars by John Langellier. Long nasty guerrilla war. Main folks were Emilio Aguinaldo, Frederick Funston, Gens Merrit, Otis and Arthur MacArthur. There is another movie out there in Spanish about a Spanish company defnding a church against the Philippinos. Then there is the 1996 "Rough Riders" (only the Santiago Campaign) but the uniforms and gear are pretty good. Check on line for the works of Fredric Remington - he drew some excellent stuff on Cuba.

I love their hats! Great art !

ColorCopyCenter's avatar

Thanks, the Boers had a distinctive style of fashion

Soulslayer317's avatar

Looks like it be a tough battle

ColorCopyCenter's avatar

The uphill battles were very difficult for the Boers, since they were unaccustomed to and untrained for the violent shock of close quarters infantry assault work and the heavy casualties involved. But the British often poorly sited their defensive positions and entrenchments, so in the case of their most brilliant successes, the Boers were able to work their way around to a weakly defended flank or advance all the way to the British main line of defense under cover of dead ground without taking too many losses. Even so, at Spioenkop and Platrand, the Boers lost heavily due to the inherent danger involved in assaulting enemy entrenchments on higher ground. It was very much anathema for them to risk their lives in such desperate gambles, and the fact that they did is a testament to their dedication to their cause and their country.

huberthowhow's avatar

I wonder, is the capture of Big Tits immanent?

ColorCopyCenter's avatar

Different character, superficially appearance

JSailer's avatar

Kinda of a San Juan Hill?

ColorCopyCenter's avatar

Yes, two of the greatest Boer victories in their military history were bold uphill assaults against poorly entrenched or poorly sited British infantry positions.

Ohh! this one looks awesome i love how the shading looks very professional and beautiful.

very dramatic and very beautiful

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