Shop Forum More Submit  Join Login
Velociraptor by ChrisMasna Velociraptor by ChrisMasna
Well, my last depiction of V. mongoliensis was getting old...so I made a new one. Not only because in during this time (a year or so) I developed somewhat better artistic skills, but because I took it more seriously (i.e. color) this time. Also, it's my first dinosaur wearing the wing feather arrengement proposed by Longrich et al. (2012).
If you are wondering if I will upgrade this infographic, the answer is absolutely yes. Not soon, tough, as it needs a total revamp (i.e. wing feathers diagram is now old) and I currently lack of the necessary time.

The proposed sexual dimorphism (dichromatism) is quite conservative, featuring an owl-ish plumage (no species in particular) in males, in contrast with the uniform brown plumage in females.
The height of the human silhouette is 175cm.



References used:
:bulletblack:Skeletal drawings by Scott Hartman and GSP (top-view was indispensable for modelling).
:bulletblack:Longrich et al., Primitive Wing Feather Arrengement in Archaeopteryx lithographica and Anchiornis huxleyi, Current Biology (2012).

As usual, many thanks to dracontes, Tomozaurus, albertonykus, and jobaria for their help.

Color variation due to congenital disorders:
Add a Comment:
 
:iconthetobinator2145:
TheTobinator2145 Featured By Owner Sep 25, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
awesome detail on the feathers!
the one detail i don't like as much though is the coloration (or rather the shade). it should be more sandy colored like a lion or a Kit Fox to blend in with ancient Mongolia (which like today was hot during the day cold during the night (making a thick layer of feathers essential to not roasting during the day or getting hypothermia during the night) and really sunny and sandy. but aside from the shading the general shape of the feathers and the size of the animals depicted (i like how they aren't Jurassic park's 6-foot turkey lizards) i would give this a 4 to 4.5 out of 5.
Reply
:icontimelessmoddingteam:
TimelessModdingTeam Featured By Owner May 2, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
This is outstanding mate! 11/10 for accuracy! I really like the "Minimalism" of the colouration. So subtle and yet so stunning! You really hit the nail right on the head with this one! You need much more attention bud!

Keep up the amazing work!
-Harvey
Reply
:iconchrismasna:
ChrisMasna Featured By Owner May 11, 2016  Professional Digital Artist
thanks!
Reply
:icondinu1999:
dinu1999 Featured By Owner Mar 2, 2015  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Really like it :) Incredible how you paint the feathers :o
Reply
:iconchrismasna:
ChrisMasna Featured By Owner Mar 11, 2015  Professional Digital Artist
thanks!
Reply
:iconelliejaybird:
EllieJayBird Featured By Owner Dec 18, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Bow ties are cool
Reply
:iconthetobinator2145:
TheTobinator2145 Featured By Owner Sep 25, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
bow ties are AWSOME!
Reply
:iconfriggo-glicker:
Friggo-Glicker Featured By Owner Sep 16, 2014
Hola...gran trabajo con la reconstrucción...tengo una duda ¿que referencia tienes para el dimorfsmo sexual? también estoy haciendo una reconstruccion de un velociraptor y quisiera saber si hago un macho (que debería ser mas colorido que la hembra)
Reply
:iconstellarmagic01:
stellarmagic01 Featured By Owner Jul 6, 2014
I like this a lot, though I'm not as big of a fan of the color pattern, I think they'd probably look better with a more mottled color pattern similar to that of the modern Roadrunner, which I think would have a similar ecological niche to the velociraptor, and a similar environment.

Anyone else look at the newest images for the velociraptor and decide that the idea of them using their foreclaws to grab hold of the prey seem far-fetched?  The long sickle claw is definitely a weapon, but I think that they'd use it more like how the modern cassowary uses that claw instead of as some scientists suggested... where the animal would grab hold of a larger prey item and slash with the sickle claw into the belly.

I just can't see them grabbing hold of anything with that feather arrangement.  Maybe they used them in threat displays, and to adjust their balance when evading threats at speed.  There's probably a good reason that Austroraptor's foreclaws are so reduced and vestigial in appearance.

As for sexual dimorphism, that varies a lot in birds... sometimes its spectacular and sometimes it's almost non-existent.   For velociraptors, I think a slight difference in sexes makes pretty good sense, though I do think other species are more likely to have significantly greater sexual dimorphism, the Oviraptor crest just screams a bright color for males.

Personally a stripe of color behind the eye or on the snout would fit really well if you went with a more Roadrunner type of look.
Reply
:iconcjcroen:
CJCroen Featured By Owner Jun 11, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
This is very helpful!
Reply
:iconstudiospectre:
StudioSpectre Featured By Owner Nov 19, 2013  Professional General Artist
Good Call on the color choice.  Sometimes an animal doesn't need embellishment, and simple practical colors work very well.
Reply
:iconchrismasna:
ChrisMasna Featured By Owner Dec 7, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
Thanks, agree.
Reply
:iconbhut:
bhut Featured By Owner May 17, 2013
Very impressive, and realistic too. I like it.
Reply
:iconchrismasna:
ChrisMasna Featured By Owner May 26, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
thanks!
Reply
:iconbhut:
bhut Featured By Owner May 27, 2013
You're welcome!
Reply
:iconthemorlock:
TheMorlock Featured By Owner Mar 25, 2013  Student General Artist
Why no leg feathers?
Reply
:iconchrismasna:
ChrisMasna Featured By Owner Mar 29, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
Why should a fully cursorial dromaeosaur still have long leg feathers? The WIP used to have them, but at some point I just took them off.
Reply
:iconthemorlock:
TheMorlock Featured By Owner Mar 29, 2013  Student General Artist
Makes sense, I guess. A lot of reconstructions have leg feathers.
Reply
:iconveloxirunner:
Veloxirunner Featured By Owner Feb 16, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
wow man, wow! i will do a critique later
Reply
:iconzinnorokkrah:
Zinnorokkrah Featured By Owner Feb 7, 2013
Stunning! Can definitely see this as what the animal would have looked like in real life. I also really love the look of the subtle sexual dimorphism- wonder how close you'd have to be to see the difference? Probably way too close.
Reply
:icondrachenvuur:
Drachenvuur Featured By Owner Feb 6, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
I like the idea of the owl-esque plumage. Great job :D
Reply
:iconchrismasna:
ChrisMasna Featured By Owner Feb 6, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
Thanks!
Reply
:iconkazuma27:
Kazuma27 Featured By Owner Feb 6, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Love it!
Could you make something similar with the canadian raptor, aka Dromaeosaurus Albertensis?
Reply
:iconchrismasna:
ChrisMasna Featured By Owner Feb 6, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
While I'd love to do a chart like this with every single dinosaur, my 'to do' list is already too long... :(
Reply
:iconkazuma27:
Kazuma27 Featured By Owner Feb 7, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Ok, don't worry :)
Reply
:icont-pekc:
T-PEKC Featured By Owner Feb 6, 2013
Oh, beautiful Velociraptor, all 4 versions of it!
Reply
:iconchrismasna:
ChrisMasna Featured By Owner Feb 6, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
Thanks, man!
Reply
:iconzimices:
Zimices Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2013  Hobbyist
Coincido plenamente con Malevouvenator. Me puse a comparar este con la versión de la infografía y las plumas están bastante más logradas, en especial las de las...¿alas? Bueno, además el color le sienta bien a un animal de un entorno árido, se camuflaría sin problemas.
Reply
:iconchrismasna:
ChrisMasna Featured By Owner Feb 6, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
:) gracias. sí, a esta altura le llamo alas...no sé que rigurosidad tendrá el término.
Reply
:iconzimices:
Zimices Featured By Owner Feb 7, 2013  Hobbyist
Francamente yo tampoco sé si será correcto... ;)
Reply
:iconjd-man:
JD-man Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2013
"If you are wondering if I will upgrade this infographic, the answer is absolutely yes. Not soon, tough, as it needs a total revamp (i.e. wing feathers diagram is now old) and I currently lack of the necessary time."

Personally, I'd rather see the box w/the Norell quote get its own deviation b-4 an updated version of the infographic. ;)

"The proposed sexual dimorphism (dichromatism) is quite conservative, featuring an owl-ish plumage (no species in particular) in males, in contrast with the uniform brown plumage in females."

Don't forget about "reversed sexual size dimorphism" ( [link] ).
Reply
:iconyoult:
yoult Featured By Owner Feb 6, 2013  Professional General Artist
I personally wouldn't compare extant and extinct raptors just because of the name.
Is there any reference for Dromaeosaur-females to be bigger, like in T. rex?
Reply
:iconjd-man:
JD-man Featured By Owner Feb 6, 2013
You probably didn't mean it this way, but please don't put words in my mouth. I never said it was "just because of the name". Rather, it was b/c they're both hypercarnivorous dinos. As indicated by the article linked in my previous comment, RSSD is the rule for living hypercarnivorous dinos ("but in some birds, such as many shorebirds and birds of prey, the reverse is true"). The same was probably true for extinct hypercarnivorous dinos, given the evidence (E.g. See the Galton quotes for Syntarsus & T.rex).

Quoting Galton ( [link] ): "The latter reassignment was based on the assumption that the hexapleural type sacrum of Hypsilophodon foxii was equivalent to the robust morph of the theropod dinosaur Syntarsus rhodesiensis (Lower Jurassic, southern Africa). On the basis of anatomical (Raath, 1977, 1990) and histological evidence (Raath, 1977; Chinsamy, 1990), the robust morph probably represents the female."

Quoting Galton ( [link] ): "In the theropod dinosaur Tyrannosaurus rex, there is also a femoral sexual dimorphism (Larson, 2008), with the robust morph identified as female based on pelvic dimensions and fused caudal vertebrae. Analyses for the presence of medullary bone in this same series of femora showed a significant clustering with the robust forms (Schweitzer et al., 2005). This indicates that the robust morph was probably female because female birds form medullary bone as a calcium reservoir to aid in egg shell formation (Dacke et al., 1993)."
Reply
:iconchrismasna:
ChrisMasna Featured By Owner Feb 6, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
Thanks for the suggestion -and quotes- on reversed sexual size dimorphism. I considered it, but I prefer to be conservative at the moment.
Reply
:iconjd-man:
JD-man Featured By Owner Feb 7, 2013
Anytime. If your open to another suggestion, how about a Velociraptor pair w/Golden Eagle-esque coloration/dimorphism?
Reply
:iconmalevouvenator:
malevouvenator Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2013
Que buen trabajo en las plumas. Por un principio pense que eran el color definitivo descubierto por las plumas como paso con el microraptor y demas.
Reply
:iconchrismasna:
ChrisMasna Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
Gracias! (espero haber interpretado bien el paper). Ojalá se pueda realizar tal estudio de coloración, pero dadas las condiciones de preservación necesarias, lo dudo mucho para esta especie.
Reply
:iconfriggo-glicker:
Friggo-Glicker Featured By Owner Sep 16, 2014
en cualquier caso, no creo que debieses limitarte por esos estudios; la pigmentación propuesta proviene de los melanocitos, sin embargo aves como el arrendajo azul cullos melanocitos dictan marrón, tienen coloración azúl debido a la estructura de las plumas y como estas defractan la luz. Por otro lado, se da en aves como el flamenco que la alimentación hace variar el color de las plumas
Reply
Add a Comment:
 
×
  • Art Print
  • Canvas
  • Photo
Download JPG 2600 × 2468




Details

Submitted on
February 5, 2013
Image Size
694 KB
Resolution
2600×2468
Link
Thumb

Stats

Views
14,176
Favourites
387 (who?)
Comments
38
Downloads
211