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The Overgrown Earth by ChaosFissure The Overgrown Earth by ChaosFissure
This planet was a living, vicious amalgam.  The main continents were differing strains of flora that ceaselessly choked each other out, coming up with incredible poisons and immunities as they all attempted to gain dominance over the planet.  Eventually, one side won.

Apo + Chaotica
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This image, or modifications of this image, is not to be used, reuploaded, or redistributed in any form without my prior, written permission. © ChaosFissure 2019
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:iconleolverion:
Leolverion Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2019
Water and earth!
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:iconalfonsopina887:
alfonsopina887 Featured By Owner Jan 12, 2019  Student General Artist
this is so fantastic and amazing 
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:iconskullkidross:
SkullKidRoss Featured By Owner Jan 9, 2019
This is really interesting and cool. It made me think of an alternate reality where flora and fauna get tired with humans and just take over the world.
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:iconsylverone:
Sylverone Featured By Owner Jan 9, 2019  Hobbyist General Artist
It's really impressive how painterly this looks. The thumbnail had me thinking this had to be a post-processed fractal, and for a bit I still thought so at full size, but I can believe this is a straight render after looking at the details. By the way, I like your signature mark, got that profesh aesthetic. ;)
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:iconchaosfissure:
ChaosFissure Featured By Owner Jan 9, 2019  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Cheers :D  I love working with textural components to fractals, since that's one of their greatest strengths!

The majority of my stuff is raw, and sometimes I'm a bit too proud of it in that regards to try doing postwork and improving aspects of what I create that don't fit into place as I'd ideally envision them.  I end up with mad things like these:  [ITERATOR BEAM], [The Fun], [RadiantNight Preview].  Granted, most of my work isn't /that/ mad -- maybe a half or a third as much!

The signature is a vectorized version of Frozen Feathers with a bit of text haha. Most people don't comment on it and instead complain about watermarks and things, so I'm glad to hear something positive about it xD
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:iconsylverone:
Sylverone Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2019  Hobbyist General Artist
I can relate to that. I can be a bit of a compulsive purist myself, at times. And the less layers and steps between the final image and the raw fractal, the less of that delicious fractal information is lost. ;) Given their nature, there's not much you can do to a fractal image that doesn't simplify it.

What stands out to me in your gallery is that many of your IFS fractals don't give themselves away with the obvious obvious signatures seen in a lot of fractal works, such as accentuated spirals or Julia, Sierpinski, or fern geometries, not to mention the bubble cities and flowers that so many fractal artists like. Not to say that there aren't good specialists in all of those areas or that some of those works aren't awe-inspiring, but I think I somewhat appreciate the difficulty of the challenge you take up for yourself, be it intentional or not.
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:iconchaosfissure:
ChaosFissure Featured By Owner Jan 26, 2019  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Hmmm, I don't think I'm following you regarding simplification. Can you clarify what you mean by that?  I see adding more components or transformations as introducing extra complexity, which can be necessary to add anything from minor details to major structural texture into an image, but they don't cause any information to be lost mathematically speaking...

My artwork does have spirals and recursion if you know where to look, or if I haven't blurred them into oblivion haha XD  In all seriousness, I ended up messing around with linear transformations for about two weeks, and ended up making some pretty crazy cloud-like shapes that both surprised and awed me. Seeing that, I knew I could make more clouds, space artwork, and maybe even landscapes.  From that point, making artwork has become a process of exploration rather than configuration.

Prior to that, I was frustrated, and convinced I should give up on fractals -- I didn't feel like I had the ability to inject enough of myself into what I was creating, and wasn't content with following tutorials to the letter and not having a clue what I was doing. I still enjoy looking at more typical fractals, but they don't have the same appeal to me as the vast richness of textures and organic combinations of shapes of the freeform fractals I create.
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:iconsylverone:
Sylverone Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2019  Hobbyist General Artist
I was referring to postprocessing when I mentioned "layers and steps" reducing information. Many or most image filters for instance are convolutions which by definition throw away information by combining neighboring pixels in non-reversible ways. Not that it always matters. I ran a pass of sharpening on some of the fractals in my gallery because I thought it improved the look, but beyond a certain point I can tell fractal detail is being lost.

Indeed, the "arm" on the right of this fractal is clearly a spiral attractor arm and I can see its children throughout.

Fractal art is really fascinating in how it relates to other art forms. It is like life photography in that there is an inherent exploratory aspect; it's too complicated to explicitly control or predict entirely, so there's an element of sensing when you are "close" to something interesting that you might actually be able to reach, like spotting a good photo opportunity. But you're "photographing" mathematical space rather than physical space, so the rules of exploration are different. In some sense what you did was find a comfortable and interesting "territory" to act as a base to explore from. Until then you were "in the wilderness" so to speak. Infinity isn't so exciting when you're lost in it, with no idea which direction leads away from more of the same.
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:iconchaosfissure:
ChaosFissure Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2019  Hobbyist Digital Artist
There's some people who upscale fractals *shudder*, in talk of losing information XD  And sure, image filters by definition don't preserve all the information in an image because they modify the source -- any non-invertible transformation or quantization of data exhibits the same things.  I don't inherently find this bad, either.   I'll admit to many times wishing I could digitally paint over scenes I've created because my mind see so much more in what I've created, even if it would be at the expense of the fractal structure itself.  I see more than fractals in what I create -- I see stories, they can convey themes, or can serve to reflect emotion -- I just lack the skill to translate the remainder of what I see onto a canvas and have no dialogue to begin knowing how to start.

Fractal art certainly is fascinating.  I'll disagree that it can't be entirely predicted, because certain mathematical configurations of fractals can yield results that are entirely expected, and technically you can do the math and understand how something will look.  You can see patterns in how things move and use it to reinforce structure you like, or want to alter. There's a nice infinite where you have enough control to see how something interacts, and can toy around with it and skip both backwards into the past and back into one of the branches you took from it.  Even if a branch doesn't end somewhere, it can always be revisited, or walked back to a point where you still can enjoy and explore things.
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:iconsylverone:
Sylverone Featured By Owner Jan 29, 2019  Hobbyist General Artist
I meant as a whole we can't predict in practice what all possibilities are within the space of fractals in general. Like in the physical world, there are "spaces" and outcomes that are known - easy to interpret and predict - and others which are not. For instance Apophysis fractals were starting to lose interest for you because you could not predict at the time the possibilities of linear transformations, however from there you were able to develop more control. As far as mathematical prediction goes, it is technically true but not practical due to the virtually unlimited search space and chaotic interactions of some transforms. But maybe it can work in known territory and help build "roads" that make some unknown territory easier to explore. In practice I haven't heard much of people trying to manually calculate when it comes to fractal art, but people don't often say a great deal about their process.

Often it's the ares we can predict too easily that we get bored of and this pushes us to explore for what's new out there. But it's too unpredictable to jump all the way into the unknown and have no bearings so we usually operate in some sense on the "edge of chaos" between the known and unknown, expanding the known territory and thus our creative potential. I think this is true of creative work in general - artists and creative types are the people who are attracted to the border between the known and unknown, "chaos and order", where information flow is highest. Our sense for it manifests as "interest", and if we step too far off the line into either the known or unknown, we can feel our options decrease, either because nothing unexpected is happening, or because we are "lost" in territory that we cannot yet navigate effectively.

Here's a very interesting talk relating to AI and art that you might find interesting if you're like me.
"Kenneth Stanley: Why Greatness Cannot Be Planned: The Myth of the Objective"

My metaphor of known/unknown and order/chaos is taken from talks by Jordan Peterson - I find it a useful metaphor. This video seems to summarize it pretty concisely, especially around the 3 minute mark (the rest of the playlist includes some other talks related to the subject):
"Jordan Peterson: The Necessity of Artists in Society"
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:iconbluewingfairy:
bluewingfairy Featured By Owner Jan 9, 2019
Good morning friend, oh!!!!, I believe, planets and  other celestial bodies are living beings!!!!!.
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:iconshunter071:
shunter071 Featured By Owner Jan 9, 2019  Hobbyist General Artist
That's awesome! Nice job!
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:iconuniversumnewhorizont:
Universumnewhorizont Featured By Owner Jan 9, 2019  Hobbyist Filmographer
This shouls be reallity
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:iconkovowolf:
KovoWolf Featured By Owner Jan 8, 2019  Professional General Artist
Nice work!
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:iconchaosfissure:
ChaosFissure Featured By Owner Jan 8, 2019  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thank you :D
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:iconbakrath:
Bakrath Featured By Owner Jan 8, 2019
Love the color contrast and texture on this one!
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:iconchaosfissure:
ChaosFissure Featured By Owner Jan 8, 2019  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thank you!  It's not very frequently that I work with greens like this, so I'm glad it turned out well!
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:icondamien256:
Damien256 Featured By Owner Jan 8, 2019  Hobbyist General Artist
This is beautiful,I Love it.
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:iconchaosfissure:
ChaosFissure Featured By Owner Jan 8, 2019  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thanks!  I'm glad you enjoy it!
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:iconvivapinyeeta:
vivapinyeeta Featured By Owner Jan 8, 2019  Hobbyist General Artist
ooo a nice calm version of the last. i see algae swirling in a whirlpool and a winding nature dragon.. beautiful as always
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:iconchaosfissure:
ChaosFissure Featured By Owner Jan 8, 2019  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Indeed.  I was debating making this one image with them side-by-side, as I felt that juxtaposition might have been interesting.  I've already uploaded both things separately however XD
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January 8
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