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Ceres and The Asteroid Belt [2]

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Ceres and The Asteroid Belt [2]

This is my second version. My other attempts, Ceres and The Asteroid Belt and Ceres and Her Sisters, were declined by the Moderator.

The Moderator said that it didn’t meet the criteria of ‘design’, because of the captions, citing ManipulateThis’s guidelines in About: Design, Scene, And Elements And Principles.

Although, the guidelines state that a “design, may,  or may not, include words, symbols, etc.”

So, there you go. As the saying goes, if I wasn’t making mistakes, I wouldn’t be making anything.

It’s nice to think that someday we’ll be out there among the stars.

Guess we’ll find out when we get there.

Stephen Hawking Sings Monty Python… Galaxy Song (Music Video)

-Cat…

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This was made for Solar Gods Challenge Extended!, hosted by ManipulateThis

:iconmanipulatethis:

Theme: This is a Design Challenge. Select A Roman God Or Goddess From Mythology And Place Them Into Space With The Planet That Is Named After Them.

You Must Have The Planet (In Correct Size) With Its Corresponding God Model.

Put Additional Planets, Moons, the Sun, etc., In Their Proper Places In Space.

Skill Level: Level 2

Due Date: February 5th, 2017

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Ceres  is the largest object in the asteroid belt between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter.

A dwarf planet, 945 kilometers in diameter, it’s the largest of the minor planets and the 33rd-largest known body in the Solar System, and composes about one third of the mass of the asteroid belt.

Identified by Giuseppe Piazzi, in 1801, it was originally considered a planet, but was reclassified as an asteroid in the 1850s.

Ceres has an internal ocean of liquid water under the layer of ice.

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Memo:

Maybe, Ceres has water, because she’s been crying, remembering when she was almost a planet.

In all the universe, “For of all sad words of tongue or pen,

The saddest are these: ‘It might have been!’”

- John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892) Quaker poet, from Maud Muller (1856)

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Resources: (Required Stock Denoted With an * Asterisk)

* Nebulae: (Background):

* My 27th nebula, by Mithgariel

* My 10th nebula: red II, by Mithgariel

My 36th nebula, by Mithgariel

My 21th nebula, by Mithgariel

Ceres:

Ceres Goddess: Goddess - 7 and SinnedAngel - 1, by mjranum-stock

Model: Courtney, Sinned-angel-stock has a GoFundMe: Courtney Page, to raise funds for a medical appliance she needs. Hopefully, she gets the support she needs.

Costume:  Sappho gown by Kambriel ( [link] )

Wheat: (Although, maybe it should really be barley.)

Wheat in the field (STOCK), by XKSteve

Free Stock: Wheat, by Onistocke

Wheat field stock, by kuiwi

Wheat Stock, by AfarStock

-Wheat in the field, at Wikimedia Commons, by Dehaan; License:  Creative Commons Attribution 3.0

-Wheat, at Wikimedia Commons; This is in the public domain, because it is a work prepared by an officer or employee of the United States Government as part of that person’s official duties under the terms of Title 17, Chapter 1, Section 105 of the US Code. See Copyright.

Ceres: Dwarf Planet: RC3 - Haulani Crater (22381131691).jpg, at Wikimedia Commons, from Justin Cowart, under the Creative Commons, Attribution 2.0 Generic, by NASA Dawn  Probe, UT May 4, 2015, from 13641 km away,  NASA / JPL-Caltech / UCLA / MPS / DLR / IDA / Justin Cowart

Ceres Diagram: Interior Structure of Ceres, at Wikimedia Commons, from photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/jpeg….

This is in the Public Domain, because NASA copyright policy states that "NASA material is not protected by copyright unless noted". (See NASA copyright policy page or JPL Image Use Policy.)

Ceres Symbol: Ceres Symbol, Astronomical symbol of dwarf planet 1 Ceres, from Wikimedia Commons, 2006, “I, the copyright holder of this work, release this work into the public domain. This applies worldwide.”

Vesta:

Vesta Goddess: Greek Goddess 2, by Lisajen-stock

Fire png, by TinaLouiseUk

Fire png, by TinaLouiseUk

Vesta (Asteroid):

Vesta in Natural Colour, at Wikimedia Commons, from Dawn  Probe, planetary.s3.amazonaws.com/ass…, NASA, JPL, July 24, 2011, from a distance of about 5200 kilometers, Björn Jónsson.

This is in the Public Domain, because NASA copyright policy states that "NASA material is not protected by copyright unless noted". (See  NASA copyright policy page or JPL Image Use Policy.)

Vesta Symbol: Vesta Symbol, at Wikimedia Commons.

This is ineligible for copyright and therefore in the public domain because it consists entirely of information that is common property and contains no original authorship.

Pallas:

Pallas  Goddess: Pallas - 54, by mjranum-stock Model: Amber G.

Pallas Proto-Planet: Pallas, from Hubble Telescope, from Hubble Telescope 2007, in Wikimedia Commons, from NASA, PallasHST2007.jpg

This is in the Public Domain because NASA, ESA, and NASA Hubble material (prior to 2009) is copyright-free and may be freely used as in the public domain without fee, on the condition that only NASA, STScI, and/or ESA is credited as the source of the material.

Pallas Symbol: Pallas Symbol, Wikimedia Commons, in the Public Domain.

This is ineligible for copyright and therefore in the public domain because it consists entirely of information that is common property and contains no original authorship.

Hygeia:

Hygeia Goddess: Medea 2, by syccas-stock

Snake Stab by YBsilon-Stock, by YBsilon-Stock

Baby corn snake stock, by A68Stock

Hygeia Asteroid: Hygeia, at Creative Commons, under Attribution 4.0 International license, by Astronomical Institute of the Charles University: Josef Ďurech, Vojtěch Sidorin

Hygeia Symbol: Hygeia Symbol (The Rod of Asclepius), at Creative Commons, by Adam Cuerden, “I, the copyright holder of this work, release this work into the public domain. This applies worldwide.”

The Sun:

Golden Planet Sun PNG, by RavenMaddArtwork

Big Lens And Optical Flare Collection, by daWIIZ

Mars:

Mars, by GrahamTG

Mars 23 aug 2003 hubble, from Hubble Space Telescope (2003), Wikimedia Commons, from NASA, PallasHST2007.jpg

This is in the Public Domain because NASA, ESA, and NASA Hubble material (prior to 2009) is copyright-free and may be freely used as in the public domain without fee, on the condition that only NASA, STScI, and/or ESA is credited as the source of the material.

Jupiter:

Jupiter and Io, by GrahamTG

Portrait of Jupiter from Cassini,  from Wikimedia Commons, by Jet Propulsion Laboratory of the United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) under Photo ID: PIA04866.

This is in the Public Domain, because NASA copyright policy states that "NASA material is not protected by copyright unless noted". (See  NASA copyright policy page or JPL Image Use Policy.)

Asteroids:

Asteroid Ring Stock Pack, by Euderion

Asteroid megapack, by thefirstfleet

Solar System (from Ceres):

Dawn Flight Configuration 2, from Wikimedia Commons.

This is in the Public Domain, by NASA. NASA copyright policy states that "NASA material is not protected by copyright unless noted". (See Template:PD-USGovNASA copyright policy page or JPL Image Use Policy.)

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Planets2008, from en:Image:Planets2006.jpg, sse.jpl.nasa.gov/planets/index…, at Wikimedia Commons.

This is in the Public Domain, by NASA. NASA copyright policy states that "NASA material is not protected by copyright unless noted". (See Template:PD-USGovNASA copyright policy page or JPL Image Use Policy.)

NASA Dawn Probe: Dawn Probe NASA, from Dawn Spacecraft (Artist's Concept), at Wikimedia Commons.

This is in the Public Domain, by NASA. NASA copyright policy states that "NASA material is not protected by copyright unless noted". (See Template:PD-USGovNASA copyright policy page or JPL Image Use Policy.)

Other Resources:

Big Lens And Optical Flare Collection, by daWIIZ

Texture 203, by Malleni-Stock

mars bokeh stock, by TrishaMonsterr-stock

FOG/CLOUDS PNG, by Moonglowlilly

Software:

autodesk-sketchbook and Sketchbook Pro

PSE9: Photoshop Elements 9

Affinity Photo

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Notes:

[1] Ceres (Dwarf Planet) is the largest object in the asteroid belt  between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter.

Its diameter is approximately 945 kilometers (587 miles),[6] making it the largest of the minor planets within the orbit of Neptune.

It’s the 33rd-largest known body in the Solar System.

Ceres comprises about 1/3rd of the mass of the entire asteroid belt.

[2] Ceres is named for Ceres, the Roman goddess of agriculture.

It was called Hera for a short time in Germany.[48] 

In Greece, it is called Demeter, after the Greek equivalent of the Roman Cerēs.

In English, it’s called 1108 Demeter.

The old astronomical symbol of Ceres is a sickle, or reversed for the letter ‘C’.

[3] Vesta, with the minor-planet designation 4 Vesta, is one of the largest objects in the asteroid belt, with a diameter of 525 kilometres.

 It was identified by Heinrich Wilhelm Olbers in 1807 and is named after Vesta, the virgin goddess of home and hearth from Roman mythology.

Vesta is the second-most-massive and second-largest body in the asteroid belt after the dwarf planet Ceres; and comprises an estimated 9% of the mass of the asteroid belt.

[4] Pallas is the second asteroid to have been discovered (after Ceres), and it is one of the largest asteroids in the Solar System.

It comprises an estimated 7% of the mass of the asteroid belt

It is 512 kilometers in diameter, somewhat smaller than Vesta.

It is likely a remnant protoplanet.

It was named for Pallas (daughter of Triton), who was raised with Athena, as a foster sister. During a friendly fight between the two goddesses, Pallas was mortally wounded. From remorse, Athena created the palladium, a statue in her likeness.

[5] Hygiea is the fourth-largest asteroid in the Solar System, located in the asteroid belt. With somewhat oblong diameters of 350–500 kilometres and a mass estimated to be 2.9% of the total mass of the belt.

 It was named for Hygieia, the Greek goddess of health, daughter of Asclepius (Aesculapius for the Romans).

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Watching:

Was Our Asteroid Belt Once A Planet?

(Maybe, Ceres has water because she’s mourning, remembering when she was a almost planet.)

Listening to:

Kyuss - Asteroid (Music Video) (Cool Graphics)

Planet Song for Kids/Solar System Songs for Children/Ceres Song for Kids (Lots of Fun)

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Nota Bene:

Just FYI, the Moderator later added that this didn’t meet the criteria for the challenge because not only were there many captions; but, also too many goddesses, and that Dwarf Planets and Proto-Planets didn’t meet the criteria of planets in the solar system named for major Greek Gods and Goddesses.

Oh well, no doubt being a minor member of the pantheon or a Proto-Planet, one gets used to disappointment.

Back to the salt mines.

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Memo:

This was interesting. There’s so much water in the solar system.

Admittedly, it took a lot of time. Although, in astronomical terms- no time, at all.

It’s impossible to conceive of things that have existed and changed so dramatically over billions of years, billions of human lifetimes, though humans are only known to have existed an infinitesimal fraction of that time- a blink of an eye.

-Cat…

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TinaLouiseUk's avatar
Great job! Thank you :) x