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Premium Garage

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Perspective drawing/study of a premium garage for a mountain estate home. Hand-drawn in pencil, scanned, tweaked in Gimp, and labeled. Good example of using picturesque design elements in an asymmetric composition using steep and shallow roof pitches. Easy to make a bonus room, small apartment, or studio above the garage. 
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© 2020 - 2021 Built4ever
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pascalkrafft's avatar

heyho awesome drawing as always, quick question tho, i have seen you posted several of your designs who were built, are you actually an architect and if yes do you mind sharing were you studied ?

Built4ever's avatar

I am self-taught and practice as a residential designer. I have unrelated degrees from university though. Here in South Carolina, to build a house, you don't need plans to be stamped by an architect as long as you are under 5000 square feet size.

pascalkrafft's avatar

ahhhh thats awesome, where i live you need to be an architect, my university however is very much against all historic styles and makes sure no student does something like this. May i ask for how long you are doing this and do you work together with structural engineers ?

Built4ever's avatar

I started drawing old buildings 25 yrs ago, did some construction work around 2005-2007, then I taught myself how to do plans around 2007-2008. Structural engineering is "light" in most custom homes, especially if you don't worry much about earthquakes, hurricanes, heavy snow load, etc. Here, we build "light." So you only worry about floor joists, rafter size/roof truss, and internal beams, usually LVLs. I can estimate LVL size from experience and using tables from the manuf. Same with rafters and floor joists. BUT, here, the way it works, the lumber yard/primary supplier to the construction job DOES THE ENGINEERING for free! So once somebody has basic plans done, the lumber yard will take over and draw more plans with floor joists, roof plans, truss designs (if used,) and beam specs. As a designer you just need common sense and experience to figure this stuff out. Coastal construction or California is different, they are much tougher, with shear wall design, roof tie-down, on and on, so they require a lot of additional engineering, thousands more spent for plans beyond my own charges. What is your school? Design philosophy of most schools is modernism. Many teachers are not really experienced doing a lot of successful design. I rejected that path because they couldn't teach me what I wanted anyways.

pascalkrafft's avatar

Hey thanks for the reply, its quit fascinating how different building seems to be in other playes i never would have thought that, its probably quit handy if you dont need to draw all these pesky detailed plans yourself haha xD Here everything is highly regulated anyways. My school is just a university of architecture and city planning. The school is the University of Stuttgart its rather large, they say they focuse on both the technical part and the "design" part but the professors are overwhelmingly standard modernist and ecologist its really nothing special, we have some successfull profs, one of them built alot of things in and around the museum island of berlin for example but usually they seem...more theoretical to put it nicely. But as far as i am aware there is no university in my country that really teaches what i want anyways. (also i am sorry if its hard to understand what i am wrighting my english is not the best)

Built4ever's avatar

Heh try Poland! Seems like they have an interest there in a couple schools that insist on traditional drawing technique, design, admiration for old traditional European buildings, etc. Not sure exactly what school(s) they are. I see LOTS of talent similar to mine coming out of Poland.

pascalkrafft's avatar

yea so far other countries were not possible due to personal reasons but i will probably try to do my masters degree in poland, tho i admit i did not know they had schools which really focused on that more then superficial. thanks for the recomendation^^

Built4ever's avatar

Lots of folks on DeviantArt from there. Maybe find some and ask questions.

cogwurx's avatar
Excellent and charming!
Mann-of-LaMancha's avatar

To me, it more closely resembles a 1930's to 1950's era auto repair shop, where the owner lives either upstairs or 'round back. The only thing missing is a support beam projecting out from the roof peak over the central garage door, where either a goose-neck barn-light, or block and tackle are hanging from it.

I see the garage doors more resembling https://i.etsystatic.com/18998634/r/il/dc3c99/2161001486/il_794xN.2161001486_alfv.jpg but lights in the doors are very cool too.


Miss-matched roofing? Experimenting with styles, or taking some simplified shortcuts?

Mann-of-LaMancha's avatar

Sweet, although I'm not fond of the overhangs at a gas station. I spotted this

https://madebymood.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/Salt-Lake-City-garage-shelving-plans-Garage-Rustic-with-driveway-installation-and-maintenance-professionals-cool.jpg

and this

https://thumbs.dreamstime.com/z/vintage-garage-1023310.jpg while I was hunting up an image of what I have in my mind's eye. Similar but not exactly what I was thinking. I couldn't find it but it was probably from some old b&w movie I saw years ago.

Built4ever's avatar

Yeah there are some 30's vintage service stations similar to this with steep roof, small ground footprint, cute look. There's one here not far from my house. The beam could be used to haul heavy desks or a piano into the studio. Roof material: the barrel tiles would be multi-colored and color-matched to the slate, yes, a bit overwrought, could be simplified by using same slate. Yes on doors you showed, those can work.

Mann-of-LaMancha's avatar

Yup, lots of ways those beams were used. For a garage, a perfect way to hoist an engine. In silent movies, a high-rise equipped with a beam (for moving furniture as you describe when they didn't have freight elevators) were where some daredevil was suspended.

Secantz's avatar

Love the Tudor-style garage. Nice angle away from the house, too. Makes the house appear larger without really being larger. Good idea to add a room on the top, too.

RazielZnot's avatar
Cars need more space than humans. What a world...
L3ynx's avatar
This appears to be a garage with a bonus space above it, not a full home dominated by a garage.
Built4ever's avatar
Built4ever's avatar

Yeah I have noticed the absurdity of doing a two-car garage on a $200K new house with 1600 SF of living space. Why are we spending that much budget to share the house with cars? Of course, with luxury houses, (what this garage is intended for,) they really want 3-5 car garage minimum. However, considering we were just hit with a huge hailstorm 2 days ago, glad my car was in the garage!!

Skoshi8's avatar
Lots of garages are just used for miscellaneous storage.
Built4ever's avatar

Yes including mine. 21' wide garage is good for one car and misc. storage, it's too tight to fit two cars anyways.

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