bLAZZE92's avatar
220 Watchers28.4K Page Views14 Deviations

Most theropods probably had lips

Most theropods probably had lips

This is just a quick journal entry to let all of you know I'm overhauling of my non-bird theropod skeletals, and a large part of it is to put more obvious (and IMO more accurate) lips on them. I've written up a (lengthy) blog post outlining the evidence that supports theropods lips here: http://www.skeletaldrawing.com/home/the-lip-post1 I will do a second blog post in the next week or so on what correlates I'm using to guide the lip reconstructions. I also wanted to warn people that while I've updated around half of my theropod skeletals it will most likely be a few more weeks before I have those uploaded to DA, so in the meantime you are be

How bulky was Megalodon?

How bulky was Megalodon?

[Bg] Throughout the years, there have been various attempts to reconstruct the extinct giant shark, Carcharocles (Otodus) megalodon. Most of these have based on its modern relative and closest living analogue, the great white shark Carcharodon carcharias. That is the first thing important to note here, because all the following is exclusively based on the white shark. Of course the very real possibility remains that C. megalodon looked nothing like envisioned here, but that is useless as long as there are no data to aid in coming up with a more likely reconstruction. Most people seem to be quite fine with using the white shark as an analogue,

Dilophosaurus size

Dilophosaurus size

Dilophosaurus wetherilli, from the Hettangian or Sinemurian Kayenta Formation of Arizona, to many seems to be a sort of quintessential early theropod. And there are a number of good reasons for that: Firstly, it’s been known for a long time. Welles dug up several nice, articulated skeletons as early as the 1940s. Secondly, it’s from the US…that often (though not always) helps things along.  Thirdly, it’s morphology was so clearly different from other theropods known at the time, and is still so unusual compared to other well-known theropods, that it’s easily recognizable to anyone, probably leading to its inclus
0Comments

AMNH 5767, the forgotten giant theropod

AMNH 5767, the forgotten giant theropod

This is not the first time I am pointing out the critical importance of sample size and the difference between average and maximum body sizes in extinct taxa, and I think what follows could be a nice demonstration of this. A recent comment by ~randomdinos (https://www.deviantart.com/randomdinos) made me wonder about the real size of AMNH 5767, better known as "Epanterias amplexus" (or just plain old Allosaurus fragilis sensu Chure 2000, though common wisdom has it that this is the specimen actually reaching the 12m-mark). It’s commonly stated to be 20% bigger than any other Allosaurus (and that might well be true), but that’s the sort of vague statement we shouldn&
  • Mexico
  • Deviant for 12 years
  • He / Him
Badges
Albino Llama: Llamas are awesome! (52)

The largest known bear Part 2.

The largest known bear Part 2.

  Ursus “maritimus tyrannus” Described and named in Kurten (1964), it consist of a lone ulna found near Kew Bridge, London, catalogued as BM 24361. The ulna is missing the distal epiphysis which Kurten (1964) interpreted as a sign of the specimen being sub-adult, even with said piece missing the ulna is about 440mm long and it was estimated that it would have been 485mm long when complete.  On plate 2 of his paper, Kurten compared BM 24361 with a large sub-adult polar bear (UZI 3) and here I do the same. On the face of it BM 24361 is a giant, 13.3% longer than UZI 3 and the maximum proximal diameter corroborates that measuremen

The largest known bear Part 1.

The largest known bear Part 1.

Ever since reading this post by Cameron McCormick (AKA The LordGeekington (https://www.deviantart.com/lordgeekington)) and subsequently Soibelzon and Schubert (2011) I’ve been interested in the size of bears and I’ve wanted to know how true were the claims. Did bears the size of the average hippo really exist? Did prehistoric bears really dwarf extant species? I will list the fossil taxa that has been claimed in recent years to represent the largest bear known, be it in the literature or on the web, I will look into the claims and if possible, estimate their mass with the same equations used by Soibelzon and Schubert (2011), comparisons with extant taxa will be made and t
21Comments

Comments 104

Join the community to add your comment. Already a deviant? Log In
What are the skeletal differences between an aurochs and a bison?
Would I be right in saying that adult tyrannosaurids had skulls that were proportionately not much smaller than those of hyaenodontids? Or somewhere in that vicinity? Do you think I'd, then, be similarly correct in presuming they could bite as hard as each other proportionately (considering similar skull size and adaptations for powerful biting)?
A quick question I would like to ask, but how big does Dinocrocuta gigantea get, for the "average" and largest individuals?
AnonymousLlama428Hobbyist General Artist
You see anything wrong with this? comments.deviantart.com/1/7631…

Do you happen to know the average size of known P. onca augusta specimens from North America?
profile pretty good but I see to many mexico-related things here.

6/10
AnonymousLlama428Hobbyist General Artist
Hello,

Looking at your work, you seem to be familiar with the brown bears of Pleistocene Europe.
I have a little (or big) query, if you don't mind answering.