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kolelishte by bensen-daniel kolelishte by bensen-daniel
...or 'wheel-zilla'

This giant alien lives inside a torus-shaped glass test, which it slowly moves by passing heavy stones through the gizzard that runs under the wheel's circumference.

This is a fast photoshop coloring of a fast sketch. The blue wheel is the glass test. The pink stuff inside is the amorphous animal. The spines on the outside of the test are to aid in locomotion (since they are hollow) also circulate air and release pheromones. The bruise-colored lumps are bulges in the gizzard caused by rocks passing through. The blue blob along the inside of the wheel is the evertile proposcuis of the animal, now tucked up. This is how they swallow the stones to get them into the gizzard.

This thing is based on a discussion going on here:
[link]

Let me know what you think!

Done while listening to:
Little Brother :)
Abundance :|
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:iconthomastapir:
thomastapir Featured By Owner Mar 5, 2009
We already had the big silicate fishbowl discussion, so I won't comment on that aspect of it (cool as it is); but what freaks me out is this creature's superficial resembleance to a creature I came up with like 15 years ago, and which I just wrote M0AI about last week! Freaky...Here's the relevant excerpt from my letter:

When I was 18 or 19 years old and first reading David Brin’s Uplift series, I was developing my own universe full of wacky alien races. Among them was a species in which the individuals resembled upright toroidal balloon tires, with a bulbous “hub” containing the brain and with two protruding eyestalks sticking out like antennae on either side of the central axis. They were called “Wheels,” imaginatively enough, and they really did rely on rolling for locomotion (I had a whole specious explanation worked out involving muscular expansion and contraction and a constant kinetic redistribution of weight, kind of a cross between the pedal motion of slugs and snails and the manner in which humans remain balanced upright). I pictured them as really quite an aggressive warrior species, at odds with their fairly inoffensive appearance, and one of my personal favorite aspects of their attire was this sort of metal harness they would wear that went on exactly like snow chains for tires, but which of course was much heavier and could be ornamented with big vicious spikes and stuff. They would roll into combat in full armor, eyestalks wrapped around their beam weapons--very “heavy metal.”

Anyhoo, certainly not identical in biology and function, but still startlingly similar in appearance.

Fantastic creature! :)
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:iconbensen-daniel:
bensen-daniel Featured By Owner Mar 5, 2009
oh, and calling your creatures wheels isn't all that much less creative than my name, which is big/scary-wheel in Bulgarian.
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:iconthomastapir:
thomastapir Featured By Owner Mar 5, 2009
It's the big-scary that makes it great! :lol:
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:iconbensen-daniel:
bensen-daniel Featured By Owner Mar 6, 2009
No kidding. Regular boring languages like spanish have diminutives (Juan->Juanito, Tomoyo->Tomo-chan) but Bulgarian has diminutives (Pavlina->;Pavlinche) and augmentatives (Pavlina->;Pavlinishte).

Dire wolf in Bulgarian is vuhlishte, from vuhlk, a wolf.
A cute little baby wolf is a vuhlche.
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:iconthomastapir:
thomastapir Featured By Owner Mar 6, 2009
NICE...That kind of thing fascinates me. A German friend once tried to explain to me some aspect of German grammar, and I just couldn't get it; I mean, I literally couldn't wrap my brain around it. It really made me wonder about the extent to which language constructs determine our view of the world.
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:iconbensen-daniel:
bensen-daniel Featured By Owner Mar 7, 2009
That would be the Sapir Worf Hypothesis, and although it's pretty popular, I don't really buy it. As an English teacher myself, I think it _is_ possible for non-native-speakers to learn new grammar and vocabulary. :)

I'm actually planning on writing about it in my journal sometime soon.
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:iconthomastapir:
thomastapir Featured By Owner Mar 7, 2009
Ah ha, that's right! I forgot it was an actual hypothesis with actual proponents and everything (versus something I came up with out of my own desperate need to make everything "weird").

I'm looking forward to hearing your thoughts on this!
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:iconbensen-daniel:
bensen-daniel Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2009
:) That's okay. I'm planning to write about it in a couple of weeks, but in the mean time, check out this site. If you enjoy wrapping your brain around different grammars, this is a fun site: [link]
It's like crosswords for linguists.
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(1 Reply)
:iconbensen-daniel:
bensen-daniel Featured By Owner Mar 5, 2009
Wow, small creative world. :) MOAI?

Okay, I can see how wheels would work that way. Sounds cool. can I illustrate one?

thanks for the comment :)
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:iconthomastapir:
thomastapir Featured By Owner Mar 5, 2009
I'd be honored if you would illustrate my Wheel! :) I'd especially like to see how closely another artist's interpretation would match my own mental image. I haven't tried drawing them in years... Oh, I neglected to mention that they even had protruding spines similar to yours!, but those were more similar to the muscular eyestalks and (were) generally kept retracted into the body of the wheel. They had suction cup discs on the end and were generally used used to assist uphill rolling etc.

M0AI, aka Cory Trego-Erdner, is a good dA friend and one of the best creature designers out there! I'd highly recommend his site:
[link]
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:iconwhalewithlegs:
whalewithlegs Featured By Owner Mar 3, 2009
This reminds me very vaguely of a James White toroid creature, though only really bu vague association of locomotion. I like how it had kind of the feel of being washed with sub lights :)
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:iconbensen-daniel:
bensen-daniel Featured By Owner Mar 3, 2009
crap, well it's supposed to be on land. I guess I overdid it with the blue shadows.

I do not believe I have ever read anything by James White. Is he good?
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:iconwhalewithlegs:
whalewithlegs Featured By Owner Mar 3, 2009
oops! My bad ... though the other creature I mentioned was an underwater one, so that's probably my bias.

I'll say this for James White ... he's one of the most inventive alien race designers I've read, even compared to the high standards we have today, but his books make you want to punch yourself in the face when you read them. This is because he uses the exact same 'witty' repartee, word for word, in every single book. His books would be incredible if they could be re-edited & condensed, but would only have maybe 1/3 of the content. That's right, 2/3 of the content is cut and pasted paragraphs of annoying dialogue.

</rant>
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:iconrodlox:
Rodlox Featured By Owner Nov 7, 2012
maybe the two of you would like _Brother Termite_ by Patricia Anthony.
(and it's got hive-based aliens, and alien sex, tastefully done, as a bonus)
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:iconwhalewithlegs:
whalewithlegs Featured By Owner Nov 8, 2012
Hmm, thank you!
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:iconbensen-daniel:
bensen-daniel Featured By Owner Mar 3, 2009
Oh for god's sake. I hate that. I suppose it makes sense though. Imagine a venn diagram with ability to write dialog, ability to make interesting characters, the knowledge necessary to understand biology, and the imagination necessary to use that understanding to make aliens. I guess not many people have all those skills.
Actually I can't think of one who does.
Let me think.
Mary Doria Russel wrote a couple of interesting books about interesting aliens, but her aliens were very much humans wearing funny clothes. She pulls it off well, but she wrote more in the tradition of Ursula LeGuin than Larry Niven.
Larry Niven's characters are all dead inside, their soulless eyes staring dispassionately at the wonders he puts in front of them. So I don't like them either.
Louis Bujold's books don't have aliens at all.
Maybe the first couple of David Brin's Uplift Books are a start in the right direction. His dolphins are truly alien.
...
yeah, I'm not getting much here
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:iconwhalewithlegs:
whalewithlegs Featured By Owner Mar 3, 2009
Hmm, i'm trying to think of an author that you might like ... I've just really been reading a lot of anthologies, mostly Dozois' 'Year's Best' .. but full-spectrum authors ... maybe ... nah, i'm just not well-versed enough. I think you're right! :)
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:iconbensen-daniel:
bensen-daniel Featured By Owner Mar 4, 2009
well, I'm open to suggestions.

My favorite science fiction authors would be:
Louis McMasters Bujold
Vernor Vinge
Charles Stross
Kage Baker
Terry Pratchett (okay, fantasy)
...
probably more but that's the list off the top of my head
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:iconwhalewithlegs:
whalewithlegs Featured By Owner Mar 4, 2009
hm! I'll definitely look into those .. i haven't read any but pratchett :)
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