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So.... Summer is going to be a blur.

Sun Jun 16, 2013, 11:37 PM
I stepped down early from my duties as CV. There's been too much going on to give the dA Trad Art community what it deserves from me. Sadly/Gladly, there's been too much going on.

Child has graduated from NAU. Kinda sorta had to attend that event.

Just painted a Corvette.

Getting ready to fly off to Denver to tape a Master Class for Craftsy.

Have Instructor materials due for Cake Central.

Have a video and photo shoot.... and Retainer Account projects.

All before July 1st.

If I survive June - I will be more than doubly blessed. But fully anticipate being a puddle of goo.



Body Art DD's + What's YOUR 1031?

Tue Oct 16, 2012, 10:35 PM
Hello CD Listeners....

I'm reacquainting myself with all things CV, but while that's going on PLEASE send in your DD Suggestions!

On the Education & Discussion front, Halloween is looming - and with it a seasonal surge of makeup trials and tribulations.... So I'll be dusting off and updating "Non-Toxic is NOT Makeup" and am looking for topics and questions for Q & A: All Things 1031.

NOTES on Suggesting Body Art & Mod DD's



1. I only accept Daily Deviations from WITHIN the Body Art & Modification categories.

2. Send a Note with "DD Suggestion" and include the Thumbnail (:thumbxxxxxxxx:)

3. Please do not send your suggestions to more than one gallery moderator.

4. You are more than welcome to suggest yourself.

PLEASE NOTE: I do NOT have the time to respond to every suggestion individually. However, I DO appreciate each and every note I receive! Thank you so much for taking the time to suggest Daily Deviations.

FAQ #61: What is a Daily Deviation?
FAQ #18: Who selects Daily Deviations and how are they chosen?
FAQ #873: What do I do when I disapprove of a Daily Deviation feature?




If your "into" bodypaint, then it doesn't take long to hear about the Wolfe Brothers - Brian and Nick.
They are a formidable influence within the community - phenomenal artists and wonderful educators.

I've painted shoulder to shoulder and shared more than a beer with these 2 - and they are NICE PEOPLE.

Well, we all know that bad things happen to NICE PEOPLE.

Brian was recently diagnosed with pancreatic cancer.
In addition to fighting for his life, the family will have staggering financial costs.

While there has been a MASSIVE groundswell of support from the bodypaint community, the word needs to get out tho the whole Artistic community....
So, please... share, link, whatever it is you do on the net.

And, skip a cup of coffee and chip in.

Words the Wolfe Family:
"Identical twins Nick and Brian Wolfe grew up in St. Petersburg, Florida and started their epic journey into the world of special effects makeup. They share inborn enthusiasm for art and illusion that has fueled their meteoric rise in the world of faceart, body painting and special effects make-up.They travel the world sharing their ideas, teaching others and helping them accomplish their dreams.

Brian has been married for 12 years to his devoted wife, Dara and they have an 11 year old daughter, Trinity. Both who are his life and biggest supporters.

Just a few days ago, Brian was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer that has knocked him off his feet and is threatening his life. While Brian undergoes treatment he is unable to work. His wife, who has stood by his side for over a dozen years is needed by his side now more than ever.

We are asking you to help the Wolfe family in any way you can. Any donation amount is greatly appreciated and will be used to help with day to day expenses so Brian can focus on healing and living his dream once again.

We also ask for privacy for the family during this extremely difficult time. As Brian receives his treatment, we will keep you updated on his recovery.  

The Wolfe family is so blessed to have such caring family, friends and fans and is extraordinarily grateful for the continued support."

Donation Link: www.gofundme.com/tg9l0
Sheesh. It's been a while since I've posted a Journal.
Too much going on - to many places traveled to and too many projects to list.

But, I do have a TEASER to share for my recent Dragon Boys body paint!

Yes, my hand even got it's own cameo!

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Agj64C…

WARNING: Even though the teaser is tame (by my standards) if you're of a conservative bent, you will probably NOT approve.
The Body Art Galleries have undergone a categorization "upgrade". Things have new names. Categories have been added to better reflect the artistic community.

Earlier, we took at look at Cosmetic Applications news.deviantart.com/article/82…

Recap:
Body Art is a home for works of art created on a human canvas.
Photo editing and digital makeup are not Body Art. Manipulation and digital art may be included as ELEMENTS of a completed image, but must not overshadow or otherwise obscure the hand-applied skills demonstrated by the Traditional artist.

Body Modification is defined as: Photographs of alterations to the skin and body.

Deviations found in Traditional: Body Art: Body Modification range from simple jewelry piercings to massive permanent changes to the body. The meaning and dedication behind Deviations varies from the impulsive to the profoundly spiritual.

Body Modification requires that the owner declare a very public pact with art. Why would someone tattoo an artichoke on their leg? Why would someone have a design cut into their flesh? The reasons are as varied as the work.

Body Modification requires an injury to the skin that requires healing. Blood is often present. It is imperative that the artist KNOWS what they are doing, and that the client understands proper aftercare – and what they are letting themselves in for. Because of this, there is a huge emphasis on education.

There are tattooists and piercers who routinely refuse service if they feel the client "doesn't get it".

There are parlors that have reputations for spreading hepatitis.

There can be a line that blurs between art, shock, and self harm.
Self harm is not permitted on DA. For more policy information, see FAQ 284 help.deviantart.com/284/

The new Body Modification categories are intended to help showcase this community by expanding the sub categories. Accompanying the category Descriptions are Examples intended to illustrate each heading. These examples include Daily Deviations from within Body Art, selections from my gallery and Favorites and images from galleries beyond Traditional that effectively illustrate an artistic execution.

Tattoos: Permanent Ink under skin
hands by PaintedPeople stef ko by zombthc medusa by nirpa

Scarification/Branding: Purposefully executed design scarring
Spiral Out by Darkest-daze Healed Peace Scarification by sillyg00sey Scarification Final by DeadlyGrl

Adornment: Permanent jewelry piercings, Dermal implants, bifurcation, etc.
Spirale durchs Ohr by Rattengoettin Dermal Anchor Star Tattoo by 2Face-Tattoo My new ears by SurgicalSteel

Ritual Piercing & Suspension: Temporary skin punctures

Mature Content

Cable Lotus by circle23

Mature Content

Laced by Doomsday-Dawn
:thumb124377589:
If you have not already noticed, Body Art has undergone a categorization "upgrade". Things have new names. Categories have been added to better reflect the artistic community.

Some things remain very much the same. Body Art is a home for works of art created on a human canvas.
Photo editing and digital makeup are not Body Art. Manipulation and digital art may be included as ELEMENTS of a completed image, but must not overshadow or otherwise obscure the hand-applied skills demonstrated by the Traditional artist.

Cosmetic Application is defined as:  Photographs of temporary color products applied to skin.

Deviations found in Traditional: Body Art: Cosmetic Application are often self-applied and photographed, and from there expand to massive collaborative projects with a team that can include photographer, model, makeup artist, hair stylist, wardrobe stylist, prosthetic artists, body painters, specialty artists and a whole host of assistants and crew.
So, it is not beyond the realm of reason to see images from one project in multiple galleries scatted across Deviant Art.
That is the joy of this medium.
So, please enjoy the work of specialized artists that frequent Body Art: Cosmetics.
The new categories are intended to help showcase the major segments of Cosmetic Application.
Accompanying the category Descriptions are Examples intended to illustrate each heading. These examples include Daily Deviations from within Body Art, selections from my gallery and Favorites and images from galleries beyond Traditional that effectively illustrate an artistic execution.

1) MAKEUP
A) Beauty – Application of cosmetics in order to enhance the face and body resulting in Fashion, Editorial, Bridal, Historical, Avant-Guard or Conceptual looks.
Summer Rain by andreaperrybevan  :thumb112181412:   Rainbow Bright by happypock   Ed Hardy Inspired Eye Makeup by anilorac186

B) Character –Application of cosmetic and special effects appliances in order to alter the face or body's natural appearance including Theater, Fantasy, Gore and Conceptual looks.
:thumb122204933:  :thumb112995418: Memento Mori by scarlet-moon1   Frozen Makeup by TimBakerFX   the Mummy 1 by panicmunkeyfx Witch Makeup by EvanCampbell :thumb118183790:   Silicone Aging Makeup by makeupartist6

2) FACE & BODY PAINT – Decorative temporary artwork which uses the face or body as a canvas.
:thumb120219228:  :thumb114564551:   :thumb120126482: Anima Effimera by LauraLeone :thumb102357165:

3) HENNA & TEMPORARY TATTOOS– Artwork created with products that stain the skin and last for several days.
la scapagliata henna by arcanoide T shape back henna by chetsang31 Hidecore Temporary Tattoo by Battledress

4) HAIR STYLING Cosmetology

A) Cut – Alter the physical length of hair in order to create a desired shape.
Milky Miss by Miss Gee by MotherLickerr   The Mask 2 by justtoocute
B) Color - Chemical Services; Use of products which change the physical structure of the hair including color, perm, and texturizers
Dulce Sara by Musidorida

Mature Content

Metamorphosis by Doomsday-Dawn
:thumb91046244:

C) Styling – Use of hair products, falls or wigs to temporarily affect the look of the hair.
Lancome Juliette by EMmakeup still be queen by sukakemayu Hot Pink by misspixie93 Carlotta by MUAstaceFACE

5) Nail Art – Nail polish artwork on real or artificial finger nails.
:thumb29386835:

Mature Content

Ms Frankenstein by Battledress


6) Testing & Spontaneous - Class work, lessons and experimentation of technique or color.

Mature Content

We are all Star Stuff.... by Battledress
Makeup Test - TCOP Close up by Guirnou Game Over: Corroder by Demonfaerieaeryka

Next time, Body Modifications!!!!

Body Art - Category REVAMP

Journal Entry: Wed Apr 22, 2009, 12:48 PM




Body Art: Revamped!

If you have not already noticed, Body Art is undergoing some changes. Things have new names. Categories have been added to better reflect the artistic community.  A series of News Articles will highlight each new Category, including examples – so keep an eye out!

Some things will stay very much the same. Body Art is a home for works of art created on a human canvas.  Photo editing and digital makeup are not Body Art.

Self harm is not permitted.

Body Art Categories and Descriptions:
-------------------------------------

****Cosmetic Application – Photographs of temporary color products applied to skin.

1) MAKEUP
  A) Beauty – Application of cosmetics in order to enhance the face and body resulting in Fashion, Editorial, Bridal, Historical, Avant-Guard or Conceptual looks.
  B) Character –Application of cosmetic and special effects appliances in order to alter the face or body's natural appearance including Theater, Fantasy, Gore and  Conceptual looks.

2) FACE & BODY PAINT – Decorative temporary artwork which uses the face or body as a canvas.

3) HENNA & TEMPORARY TATTOOS– Artwork created with products that stain the skin and last for several days.

4) HAIR STYLING  Cosmetology
  A) Cut – Alter the physical length of hair in order to create a desired shape.
  B) Color - Chemical Services; Use of products which change the physical structure of the hair including color, perm, and texturizers
  C) Styling – Use of hair products, falls or wigs to temporarily affect the look of the hair.  

5) Nail Art – Nail polish artwork on real or artificial finger nails.

6) Testing & Spontaneous - Class work, lessons and experimentation of technique or color.
---------------------
****Body Modification

1) TATTOOS- Permanent Ink placed under skin in order to create a specific design.

2) SCARIFICATION/BRANDING - Purposefully executed designs created by scar tissue.

3) ADORNMENT - Permanent jewelry piercings, Dermal implants, bifurcation, etc.

4) RITUAL PIERCING & SUSPENSION - Temporary skin punctures that result in the placement of needles or hooks in the skin which are later removed.

----------------------

*****Miscellaneous – Body Art that does not fall into any specific category or is not clearly defined in the image presented.

----------------------------

I will be editing this CR to include all the Good Pimpage that needs to be known.


Know your Traditional Art GM’s:
All Traditional Art: limnides oilsoaked snowmask stigmatattoo Street Art: noxiousone

Daily Deviation Homework:
• Body Art Suggestions, ONLY. Please…. they are all I review.
• Title your Note with “DD Suggestion” and tell me why the piece is being suggested.
• 90 Days Rule. That’s the minimum time between Daily Deviations for a Deviant.
• FAQ’s to Know: What is a Daily Deviation? help.deviantart.com/61/ How are they chosen? help.deviantart.com/18/
• Have a Problem with a DD? Don’t flame, it won’t do any good. Read: help.deviantart.com/873/
Ah, the seduction of Gore.  What kid hasn't used ketchup to make fake blood and french-fry fangs? Some of us never grow out of that phase…

This is an expansion on the topics discussed in "Non-Toxic is Not Makeup" news.deviantart.com/article/68… .  If you haven't read that first piece, you won't be totally lost, but might have a few more questions than those who have done their homework.

We're going to discuss homemade gore and special effects products – and when PRO is the ONLY way to go….  And why. There are plenty of "How-To's" out there, so again the focus will be on what the products are with a few tips thrown in. The Hollywood special effects community is famous (or infamous) for using anything that will get the makeup job done. But, they have a very healthy respect for how caustic, irritating and downright dangerous many of the things in their bag of tricks are to human beings.

So, let's do this backwards…

Tears.

Beyond what happens when the wrong thing gets put into the eye, one of the most frequent internet makeup requests is about how to make real tears, fake tears, running mascara….

The first thing you need to ask? Does the model have contact lenses in? We do NOT want to expose the model to anything that will ruin those contacts. Products can be absorbed by the lenses, creating a very uncomfortable and painful situation.

Getting a model to generate real tears is not that difficult. But unless the model is a Method Actor, some level of discomfort will be involved. Common tricks include: eye drops (single use vials), a menthol inhaler stick or peppermint oil held up to the corner of the eye, a freshly sliced onion, or something I just learned at a recent shoot – a rapid camera flash close to the face with a model who refuses to blink. The nice thing about real tears, you get a realistic red eye because the effect is not an effect, it is real.

The problem with real tears, they can ruin the rest of the makeup. The counter strategy is to rely on grease paint and cream products and avoid liquid foundations and water activated products.

Now, tears that flow down the cheek in great rivulets of angsty drama? Glycerin from the pharmacy isle is a popular choice. Just don't get it IN the eye. Not safe. Black eye shadow mixed with water thinned glycerin makes good mascara goo that can be applied by dripping off the end of a small paint brush.

Here is an image from a recent test shoot of mine that used the rapid camera flash method to produce real tears: Complications by Doomsday-Dawn

If you notice, only one thing is mentioned that should go INTO the eye – ONLY new, sterile eye drops. Even the Pro "blood drops" are ophthalmic and need to be opened, kept sterile (don't touch the eye with the applicator) and used within 30 days. According to those who have used them, these red tears blink out of the eye quickly and the effect can be a little on the puny side. In the instance of red tears in the eye, I say be willing to keep it simple and safe; use photoshop.

Here is an image courtesy of Guirnou that uses a professional product: Flirt by Guirnou

Here is the allergic reaction image from TanyaSimoneSimpson

Mature Content

The Weapon I Choose by TanyaSimoneSimpson


So, one may ask, how do they do those cool bloodshot eyes on TV and Film? The production will use the simplest, quickest, and most consistent scene-to-scene method the can. Contact lenses. Big, full sclera ones. Expensive, hand painted ones. A pair can easily cost $300.

Here is an image courtesy of Countess-Grotesque that shows a full sclera contact lens: . lost little alien . by Countess-Grotesque

Sweat.

A spray bottle with watered down glycerin is your best friend. For a more dramatic effect, or to keep the "sweat beads" longer, moisturize the skin real good beforehand. The glycerin will easily wipe off or make rivulets that run down the face.  

If you want faster rolling sweat… put plain water in that spray bottle. Add a drop of detergent if you want no beading, but a fast run instead.

Body hair is not an ally with body sweat effects. But, if it is a good hairy arm, you might be able to get some nice clinging, matted effect. Just a thought…..

Subtle, but in this age makeup image I used glycerin in a spray bottle to produce forehead perspiration: Slipping. Five. by Battledress

Blood.

Ah, the heart of the matter. In truth, pro products are not that expensive compared to the grocery list bill you'll pay while compiling a kitchen recipe. A $25 4oz jar of Blood Pigment Powder can mix up 4 to 7 gallons of the good stuff.

Red food dye is not the same as color as what is in Pro fake blood, even though they are all FDA colors. Staining and bacteria growth are the biggest concerns with DIY blood. Now, if food color stains clothing and skin, what will it do to a model's bleached white or veneered teeth?

It is fun deciding what kind of blood is needed for a project. Fresh? Arterial? Venous? Old? Clotted? Coagulated? Putrid and pussy? Maggot infested?

Recipes abound, but some of the most common ingredients are food color (red, green and blue – color theory 101), water, corn syrup, glycerin, chocolate milk syrup, and desert or plain gelatin. I've added chunky strawberry preserves and orange marmalade…

Here is an older image with homemade blood we mixed up from corn syrup and food color: Metamorphosis by Battledress

Here is an image that shows the use of professional mouth blood – known to converts everywhere as "Zesty Mint":

Mature Content

Snack Time for a Rock Troll by Battledress


Cuts & Gashes

Texture is a fun thing. Liquid latex, nose putty or wax, unflavored gelatin, even white glue – all are common ingredients for giving edges and texture to cuts, gashes, gouges and other mortal wounds. All are easily available and inexpensive, with more than one enthusiast waiting for the 75% off after Halloween sales to stockpile all manner of blood and gore.

Liquid latex is available from many a novelty store. It must be used carefully. Not all latex is skin safe. Many people are allergic to it. It stinks of ammonia and should be allowed to sit long enough to "gass off" before applied to the skin. Latex will remove any body hair, even the tiny "baby fuzz" of an arm, unless very careful skin prep is made. Thin layers applied with a cosmetic sponge makes for very cool zombie or age wrinkled skin. Add a single layer of a facial tissue, and a nice flaking skin can be achieved. Careful layering and drying will build up a thickness that can be used to create skin edges or "pockets" for blood or other goo.

Here is a tutorial courtesy of sweetgreychaos that shows a few latex ideas:

Mature Content

Liquid Latex Tutorial I by sweetgreychaos


Nose putty or wax is inexpensive but can be hard to use. It softens and becomes sticky from body heat and fingers. Petroleum jelly on the fingertips helps. Wax works better on hard boney parts where skin is thin and there is not a lot of bending. Noses and eyebrow covering are a favorite spot for wax to be used. Wax will crack if it is on too flexible an area.

Gelatin is very easy to use and has a nice translucent "skin" look and feel. Unflavored gelatin from the grocery store is not as strong as the pro version, but works. Use ¼ to ½ the water that is called for in the recipe. (Pro gelatin recipes use glycerin and sorbitol instead of water) Once cooled, the gelatin can be heated in the microwave in very short 10 second bursts until soft and workable. Just be certain to test the temperature – gelatin can burn if it is overheated and can burn the skin if not careful.

Here is a Mature Content image from a recent workshop that combines some of the Cuts & Gashes topics of discussion. Grease paint for bruises. Kryolan Rigid Collodioum scar (another very smelly product) and 1/8" thick flexible gelatin sheets body painted after they were glued on the model.

White glue…. This is not a makeup product but is used. It is safer or better than say, latex? Depends on who you ask. The MSDS doesn't specifically have cautions about skin contact. What's an MSDS? A Material Safety Data Sheet – something manufacturers must provide which declares any shipping, handling and storage considerations a product has. An internet search by product and MSDS will provide some solid information on any given product.

Here is an image courtesy of Guirnou that uses over the counter products to make some very convincing stitches:

Mature Content

Stitches Close up by Guirnou

Here is a test image courtesy of littlegett AKA "King of Zesty Mint: that uses a mix of over the counter and pro products. Without the creepy set lighting, it is easier to see how many different disciples must come together to create a successful image:

Mature Content

Zombie Candy Striper 01 Makeup by littlegett
and on set:

Mature Content

Pray for me by littlegett


Homework assignment: Visit Photography: Horror & Macabre or Traditional: Body Art for galleries full of wonderful executions of every special effect discipline from every background of artist.   

It is important to note that everything I know, I've learned from mentors and research… you have to WANT knowledge. You have to look for it. You have to have a scientific mind set. Be skeptical. Second, third and forth source information. Then, and only then, put makeup to skin.
_________
Links:

Contact lens examples – just a very few of the many companies out there:
www.9mmsfx.com/lenses.html
www.customcontacts.com/contact…
www.fxeyes.com/fxstore/shop/ca…

Special Effects Supplier with Recipes, Formulas & How To Guides:
www.fxwarehouse.info
Thus begins a diatribe on safety and education in the world of makeup and special effects.  Many products, including many “non-toxic” products, are not necessarily safe for use on the body.   Many products that can be safely used on small areas of the body are not necessarily safe for full-body use.  This article will begin and lead into a series designed to help inform and educate makeup artists, bodypainters, photographers, and models.  The goal is to help artists make informed choices and avoid making unsafe assumptions in choosing what products are safe to apply to a model’s body!

In an internet-educated, figure-it-out-for-yourself, whatever-goes world of contemporary makeup and special effects, it is easier than ever to find bad, misleading or downright dangerous information spewed out right alongside accurate, well-founded information.  “Internet” is the operative word here, because an eager audience can find information and “evidence” on the internet to “justify” or support anything it wants to.  That doesn’t mean the information is actually true, correct, or safe!   In the world of makeup, bodypainting, and special effects, the most common kinds of misconception and misinformation concern the safety of various products when being applied to the body and/or the face.

Many in this artistic community, myself included, are self-taught. Some of the most famous contemporary geniuses and historic icons of makeup and movie magic have been self-taught. Depending on the creative service offered and where, a license and formal training often is not required. Consider the training and state board certification required to cut hair in a salon, something customers take for granted. Now think of all the state fair face painters, temporary tattoo booths, and makeup artists whose “final exam” was ordering business cards. It is for this reason that mentors and assisting still serves and essential role.  More experienced artists can offer a new artist fundamental knowledge that comes from a wide range of direct personal experience, combined with the education gained through a career in the profession.

“Do I have to use real body paint?” If the person asking wants the answer to be NO, it’s all too easy to throw reason aside, and to look no further than the statements of many people who publicly say, “I used this or this or this, and I’ve never had a problem!” That doesn’t mean there never will be a problem, or there never could be a problem.  It’s essentially a justification for saying, “I got lucky and no one got hurt!”

Artists are fond of the Unique and Bizarre. Covering a person with tree bark, mirrors, grime, glitter, gore and any combination of food is a rite of passage for any portfolio. Special effects use all manner of surgical glue, latex, animal gelatin and silicone. A magic concoction of the industry is PAX – a 50-50 mix of medical adhesive and acrylic paint. This classic paint is still used for prosthetic pieces and tattoo cover in addition to a plethora of specifically designed alternatives.

The thing to note is that all this fun stuff is not, strictly speaking, cosmetic makeup. Choices are made. In a professional artistic environment, those choices are determined by analyzing the look required and reviewing the classic methods for accomplishing that look. Next, a creative artist will figure a way to take that look into a new, fresh direction.

Now here in lies the conundrum for the beginning artist. How did they do that? What did they use to create that look? A little bit of research says, “Acrylic paint is used as an ingredient on Hollywood sets. So, obviously acrylic paint must be safe for skin.  Soooooo, it must be ok to slather a model head to toe in acrylic paint. After all, it’s non-toxic!” These are the kinds of assumptions, often made with the best of intentions, that can cause serious problems and outright harm to the person having such products applied to their body or face!

An artist makes choices that have a direct impact on another person’s health and safety. In the case of shared, communal and double-dipped items like mascara, lipstick and brushes, that decision multiplies exponentially. Pinkeye, cold sores and lice are easy to spread with makeup tools. The only thing that spreads faster is a bad reputation. The artist makes risk/reward decisions for every model they touch.

Underwater, pyrotechnic, aerial shoots and the like have a high degree of difficulty and risk. These risks are mitigated by safety measures, but they will never be as safe as standing on a concrete floor in a studio. Here, the model is very engaged in the risk/reward.  The risks and rewards from various products used on the body are less obvious, but no less real.  But, it makes it harder for the model to have the knowledge necessary to contribute to making the informed decision. Therefore the brunt of the responsibility for the model’s safety falls right back upon the makeup artist/bodypainter.

Now back to the aspiring artist hitting up forums, chats and internet clips for information. It is one thing to watch a self demo on how to make a rainbow out of eye shadow. It is another thing to listen to people guess in writing if it is safe to use craft store paint and markers on skin. It is alarming to hear people cavalierly dismiss professional cosmetic products.

There are many pigments used to make paint. There are very few pigments approved for use in cosmetics. Pearls and glitters expand the gulf between safe and a roll of the dice. As rare as they are, allergic reactions can result in hives or far worse. Complicating the matter further, a cosmetic that is safe for the body may not be advisable for use on the lips or eye area. A perfect example of this is in body paints and black light makeup.

Paints have lots of ingredients besides pretty colors: flex agents, binders, flow enhancers and a delivery medium. Cosmetic ingredients are individually approved by the FDA. The same cannot be said for craft paint. Allergic reactions can include permanent scarring.

Glues and adhesives are a very frequent source of bad reactions. Latex allergies are common. The stronger adhesives require equally strong removers which themselves can irritate.

The most common reason given for not using proper products is price. Someone puts a price on someone else’s safety. In truth, quality professional products are no more expensive than the craft store alternatives. The irony is that non-cosmetic products just do not perform as well. They were never designed, approved or intended for skin.

Non-Toxic is an assessment that a product is not poisonous if ingested. There are many non-toxic things that won’t kill a person, but will still make a person ill enough to be hospitalized. Non-toxic when used as directed…. And it’s almost guaranteed that bodypainting is not a “directed” use of many of these craft paints, markers, and other products.

What about barrier creams? A manufacturer will not be eager to condone use of their product in an off-label manner. And, a salesman at the art store is not necessarily an authoritative voice in this matter. They are in business to sell something, after all.

We all begin our careers as artists by dabbling, breaking rules and finding what works. It is the nature of discovery and experimentation that draws talent to the field in the first place. If we’re lucky, no one got hurt during the learning curve. It is up to the artist to take responsibility for their actions, know their craft, and show respect for their models by making the best choices possible.

_____________________
Photos & Testimonials

Ok. Do you really think an artist is going to hold up a hand and yell for the photographer to take a picture of the model’s allergic reaction? The only photos we are likely to see are as an exhibit in a court case.

That being said, TanyaSimoneSimpson presents:

Mature Content

The Weapon I Choose by TanyaSimoneSimpson

“And in case you think it’s a good idea to put lipstick and red food dye anywhere near your eyes, take it from me - it is NOT a good idea. Yes, it makes your eyes look all swollen and puffy and you'll get genuine (allergic) tears streaming down your cheeks but it hurts like hell and I'm not entirely sure it isn't harmful. My eyes are still stinging and it's rather painful. So yeah, don't do it. Cool kids use hypoallergenic effects make-up, not food products.”
More: rockstarvanity.deviantart.com/…

As for myself, I can tell stories.
Here are a few that my Airbrush and Body Paint students have to listen to:

Kid’s Tattoo Markers (soap and water cleanup) have caused more skin reactions than ANY product in my kit (which would be why they are no longer in my kit). Worst reaction was on a child at a birthday party. Her whole body started to itch and her skin was red under the marker. Fortunately for the child AND for me, the party was thrown by a Physician who handled the situation. Child was fine. I was fine after 2 margaritas. This is why I have liability insurance.

Silicone Allergy. I had a model with extensive body paint experience say there was no need to waste time patch testing... Turns out the patch test showed a reaction to a new-on-the-market silicone based body paint. This threw the shoot into a tizzy because my anticipated product could not be used. Fortunately, I had back up products and we recovered. Come to find out, word on the professional street has it that silicone allergies are just as common as latex allergies. This is why I have liability insurance.

Adhesives. I have a model who can attest to a heart made out of red dots that lingered on her derriere after the cute little swarovski crystals were removed. These crystals, sold as “jewel tattoos” were placed on top of about 4 layers of body paint, proving that paint does not make a barrier layer - sometimes it does the exact opposite and acts as a sponge. This is why I have liability insurance.

Sunburn. Body paint does not like sun screen, so application and sun exposure have to be carefully planned. The above model (very pale) sported an inverse sun burn of the Battledress Paint-N-Body logo on her butt cheek. Our set up was in the shade. The promoter decided to parade her around in Southern California August sun for a couple of hours. Another model tried to scrub off a nice Lady Liberty paint after a 4th of July day in Newport Beach. All those red splotches were burns from where the paint was a little on the thin side.

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Links:

FDA on Novelty Makeup including face paint and black light: www.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/cos10-3…

FDA on Decorative Contact Lenses: www.fda.gov/consumer/updates/d…

FDA on Eye Cosmetics Safety: www.fda.gov/consumer/updates/e…

FDA on Cosmetic Colors: www.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/cos-col…

Model Mayhem’s Hair, Makeup & Styling Forum. Sanitary/Hygienic Precautions: www.modelmayhem.com/po.php?thr…

Model Mayhem’s Hair, Makeup & Styling Forum. Hygiene Horror Stories:
www.modelmayhem.com/po.php?thr…

Supplier Sampling:
Alcone: Makeup supply www.alconeco.com/
FX Supply: Makeup, body paint and Special Effects supply www.fxsupply.com/
Sillyfarm: face and body paint supplies www.sillyfarm.com