Shop Forum More Submit  Join Login

Feature: Valentines to Send to Friends

Journal Entry: Mon Feb 12, 2018, 10:00 AM
Sweeter Than Honey - Valentine's Day Art Exchange by art-a-lotl
A picture is worth a thousand words [Reupload] by InukkiLight of Our Hearts by yanadhyana
Goki - Valentine by SkylaComicsYou're a llama fun! by Ikue
You're the sweetest person I've ever met by ByonDrawings
For You, With Love by yanadhyanaPostcard by SunSkipp

Elegant Divider 2 - top
Valentine's Day is a reminder to tell those who matter to you that they're appreciated...
Elegant Divider 2 - bottom

Have my hearts by Kim-SukLeyExpresso how much you matter by FeatherBvtt
Happy Valentine by TammyPhotography
Valentine pup by tamaraR

Elegant Divider 2 - top
...whether they be significant others, family, or friends!
Elegant Divider 2 - bottom

Valentines Card 1/2 by ApollumixPanda Love by apparate
Perching on Chocolates by EvergrennHappy Valentine's Day! by Rainsoon

Elegant Divider 2 - top
You don't have to spend money; an expression of friendship is priceless.
Elegant Divider 2 - bottom
You're Grate! by r0se-designsThank you for being there for me! by Rubberbird
You light up my life by r0se-designs

Heart Ghost by natzufallThe Blueberry to my Muffin ^-^ by AiriMuffins
Valentine's Budgie by Okammie
Choco-chan by S0mniaLuc1d0Valentine Day and Friendship by vanndra
Valentine's! by ZjeroXytzYou're So Sweet Valentine Card by KittyMelodies
Mina Valentine Card 2018 by ArtOfRivana
Owl Valentine by Necroangl


I don't normally put my own stuff here, but if you still want more, here are the ones I've made, also meant to be sent to anyone:
Watercolor - Happy Turtle by barananduenWatercolor - Julian Playing Cupid ... and Failing! by barananduenHappy Love and Friendship Day! by barananduen
Hanging Heart by barananduen#heart by barananduenFiligree Heart by barananduen


Pink Orb Index of Past Feature Journals Pink Orb


Lovely Watchers Series: pt. 6 | pt. 5 | pt. 4 | pt. 3 | pt. 2 | pt. 1
Colors Series: Black & White | Black | Feeling Fresh | Brown | Beige, Gold, Honey Hues | Green | Pink | Purple | Yellow, Orange, Red | Blue | White
Other Features: Favorite Finds of 2017 | Segmented | Masquerade | Dreams Come True | Female & Flowers | Landscapes & Places | Donuts | Food & Drink | Christmas | Art of Succulents | Artful Sketches | Tools of the Trade | Foxes | Cute Stuff | The Sea | Fanart: Sephiroth | Photography: Still Life | Subject: Male | Subject: Animals | Photography: Flowers & Plants | Theme: Cute Halloween
Bonus: Cute Pears of Salamanca!

It's in You!

Journal Entry: Sun Dec 24, 2017, 9:00 PM
Hope. by ladylerika
art by ladylerika


I want to encourage you all to be kind to one another. We CAN make the world a better place... by doing just that.

Don't be mean to others just because someone was mean to you - all you'd be doing is perpetuating the cycle. On the contrary, break the cycle! BE THE DIFFERENCE!

Lend a helping hand.
Be understanding. Before you speak or act, put yourself in the other person's shoes.
On the internet, remember that there is a human behind every screen; treat them like you would someone face-to-face.
If someone has been kind to you, spread that and be kind to another person too.

Treat others as well as you, yourself, would like to be treated. If you do that, if another person does that too, and, little by little, more and more people make life nicer for one another, the world will become a better place, because you will have made it so.





 pink heart {big} 

Feature: Theme: Segmented

Journal Entry: Tue Dec 12, 2017, 5:52 PM
Arbre tortueux by jonathanpradillon
Falling apart by AjgielTrees by SuperImki
Finally the end ! by BezwzglednaRyba
the bitter inbetween by kelogsloopsHello Colors! - Blue 2.0 by sofierimmer
Naturbilder by griffsnuff
strawberries cocktail by FiorOf
Miss Loo in New Apartment by MarthaTuma
diptych by Vasylina:L by Sand-Gale
fields one and two by BenjaminCee
Crocosmia 03 by AlexEdgThinking of You by pauldng
Garden Quintet by LivMyers
Splash by Mis-misunderstood
feel alive by nandiamondPuzzle of Color by San-T
Clouds on Canvas by aunjuliAura Of Autumn set of 3  by Leonid Afremov by Leonidafremov
People Who Live In Glass Houses by mrartteacher
Watercolor 1 by luludeviant
Her cat by Lycanium
yes... I did this commission once  by TheJennaBrownMoondust by studioofmm

letter by mr-aprilView of Mount Fuji - a Triptych by MirielVinya
Helios and Selene by BohemianWeasel
Late November: triptych by Dferous
Beyond by KanekiruFull Moon on Winter's Night by taibossigai



:skyblue-orb: Index of Past Feature Journals :skyblue-orb:


Lovely Watchers Series: pt. 6 | pt. 5 | pt. 4 | pt. 3 | pt. 2 | pt. 1
Colors Series: Black & White | Black | Feeling Fresh | Brown | Beige, Gold, Honey Hues | Green | Pink | Purple | Yellow, Orange, Red | Blue | White
Other Features: Masquerade | Dreams Come True | Female & Flowers | Landscapes & Places | Donuts | Food & Drink | Christmas | Art of Succulents | Artful Sketches | Tools of the Trade | Foxes | Cute Stuff | The Sea | Fanart: Sephiroth | Photography: Still Life | Subject: Male | Subject: Animals | Photography: Flowers & Plants | Theme: Cute Halloween
Bonus: Cute Pears of Salamanca!

Art Advice Issue #8 - Random Traditional Art Tips

Journal Entry: Mon Nov 20, 2017, 4:37 PM
Header08 by barananduen

GENERAL


:new: * If you draw or paint on a table, keep a paper tissue under your drawing hand to keep the oils in your skin from transferring to the paper (this happens even if you've just washed your hands), which may keep the pigments from being properly absorbed in some places.


DRAWING


* To check for errors in your sketch, especially those relating to symmetry, rotate your canvas and place it on each of its sides, step away and look at it. Also, take a photo or scan it, and do a horizontal flip on the image with your computer.

* To easily transfer your sketch onto watercolor paper, board, wood, or other surface, color the back side of your sketch (scan and print it onto regular printer paper if it's in your sketchbook) with a graphite pencil (2B works fine, HB is harder to transfer), tape it graphite-side-down to your watercolor paper, and go over the lines with a pen or sharp pencil. This works like carbon paper but the lines are erasable and won't smudge.

* Erasers - Sharp corners on erasers are handy for erasing in tiny, crowded parts of a drawing. When your eraser's sharp corners are all worn out, cut a slice of the eraser using a knife or razor - you now have sharp corners again not only on your eraser, but also on the slice you cut off.

* Sharpening pencils - To get a really fine point, even finer than that of mechanical pencils, many artists use a razor to sharpen their pencils; this is also useful if you want a flat or wedge-shaped tip. Or you can use sandpaper to make the tip as fine as you wish. Alternatively, the Staedtler sharpener (article number 512 001) gives the sharpest point I have personally ever seen, and it has a bin to store the pencil shavings until you can throw them away.


PAINTBRUSHES


* If your brushes have become frayed, it's similar to when your hair becomes frizzy. Wash them gently with 2-in-1 shampoo, rinse, and then apply some hair conditioner, letting it sit for 3 minutes. After that, rinse, towel dry, and slip on the plastic paintbrush cover. I haven't tried this on artificial bristles, but it works on red sable brushes.

* If you have lost the plastic tube cover, you can make your own with a plastic drinking straw. Cut off the length you want, and slit it down the side. Roll to make it tighter and use tape to hold the shape in place. Alternatively, you can wrap a piece of tissue around your brush bristles.

* Try to not use the same brush across different media, as different media (or solvents) damage the bristles in different ways. Acrylics can build residue at the base; solvents may damage the bristles. Watercolor does not damage under normal usage, but be sure to wash them after each use.


LINER PENS


* Choose your lining pen based on what medium you'll use to color your drawing, as some are waterproof, but others will bleed when in contact with water. If you only have the non-waterproof kind and want to paint your drawing with watercolors, paint first and do your linework at the end - wait 24hrs for the paint to dry completely; if the paper is still moist, the pen will ink run. Sakura Micron pens are waterproof.

* Vary your line weight for added interest. Some people use heavier lines for the parts closer to the viewer, others use heavier lines for the outer edges of a figure. Experiment to see what you like best.

* Some liner pens, like Sakura Microns, come in a variety of sizes, which makes varying line weights much easier. Keep in mind that the way you hold your pen also affects line weight - simply slanting the pencil yields a wider line than a more vertical hold. Use techniques like this for greater versatility.

* Choose a quiet place and a steady, flat surface to do your linework. This way, you minimize the chances of someone accidentally bumping your arm while you're drawing.

* Steadier lines will come with practice - it's simply a matter or honing the motor skill associated with it; the more you do it, the more your body will get used to it, and the easier the motion will become. Practicing on doodles you don't care about will help (just make a doodle and practice lining it). Controlling your breathing will also help.

* Experiment with colored lineart for interesting effects.

* When using a ruler with liner pens, the pen's tip becomes damaged faster. Use your older pens with rulers and keep the sharper new ones for freehand lining, to extend tip life.


WATERCOLOR


* Use two water containers: one for cool colors and one for warm colors. This will help keep your cool colors crisp. Alternatively, paint all the warm tones first (or the cool ones), change water and rinse your brush, and then paint the remaining colors.

* Paint drying too slowly for you? Use a table fan (or a hairdryer on "cool" setting). Note: Do not do this if there are pools of water on your paper, unless you want splotches.

* Wait for each paint layer to dry completely before applying a new one, or you will be picking up the old layer with your brush, instead of intensifying it with new paint. While waiting for one area to dry, paint another.

* Try to not use paint with lots of binder in them, they will become dull/chalky when dry, and even make more pigmented paints duller when layered on.

* If using wet-on-wet technique, you do not need to wet the entire canvas at once. You can wet it by sections, painting one section first, waiting for it to dry completely before moving onto and wetting another, to avoid colors bleeding from one section to another.

* Do not use your good brushes for masking fluid.

:new:* To avoid drinking your brush-water, use empty yogurt containers or birdfeed cups to hold your painting water, or anything that you definitely would not confuse with your tea.


ACRYLICS


* There are heavy- and non-heavy-body paints. Heavy-body paints give you more texture and are good if you want a 3D effect and more visible brushstrokes (or for painting with a palette knife). You can also thin them down with water if you want a flatter/smoother look similar to non-heavy-body paints.

* Paint drying too quickly for you? You can use a retardant to slow down the drying time, giving you more time to blend colors.

* Tired of paint residue building up at the base of your brush, from mixing colors? Try mixing them using an icicle/ice-cream stick or a plastic knife instead.


PHOTOGRAPHING YOUR FINISHED PIECE


* Once you're done, make sure you spend some time making your piece presentable, so that all your hard work isn't lost. See these two articles:
Basic Tips to Make your Art Look Better
This month's article is a two-parter; one with basic presentation tips for different media, and one with more advanced suggestions for photographing traditional art. For the more advanced article, see here: Tips for Photographing Traditional Artwork
This part s super basic and requires no skill whatsoever, but for people who do this, it REALLY helps your art look better, when displaying online, and minimizes rejections from Groups.
I. ALL MEDIA - MAKE YOUR OWN WATERMARK OR SIGNATURE

Identifying your work is important, but the DA watermark (although it is a nice service to have) is not the best way to go about it. Even though it is easy to apply, unless you have a huge following already, you're hurting yourself more than you're protecting yourself by using it. It's very large and in the center, hurting the visibility and appeal of your work. You've spent a lot of time on your drawing or phot
Tips for Photographing Traditional Artwork
A more advanced expansion on my "Basic Tips" article, Basic Tips to Make your Art Look Better. First, let us recap on those basics:
TIPS FOR PHOTOGRAPHING ARTWORK:
Make sure your picture is laid out flat, either lying flat on your desk or attached to a wall. Minimize wrinkles. Set your camera perpendicular (at a 90-degree angle) to your picture. You can use the paper or the canvas' edges as guides against your camera's display to align the picture properly.Unless you have a DSLR with an adjustable flash and are well versed in flash photography, do not use a flash.Take the photo in a well-lit area.
This probably doesn't work if you use a phone camera, but if you use a regular camera and your hands aren't steady enough, set your camera on a pile of book (or use a tripod if you have one) to keep it steady, and use the timer to take the phot




Have other tips? Share in the comments! :)
Have a suggestion for a future Art Advice Article? Post about it here: Future Art Advice Article Topics?


Star! X. PREVIOUS ART ADVICE ARTICLES

Art Advice #7: How to Ask for + Provide Critique
Critique - if asked for and provided correctly - can be beneficial and doesn't have to hurt. Here, we'll talk about some things to keep in mind when asking for as well as when providing critique.
I.    For both the artist and the critiquer - Opening notes
II.   For the artist requesting critique / improvement help
III.  For the person providing critique
IV.   Closing remarks
I. FOR THE ARTIST AND THE CRITIQUER - OPENING NOTES
DeviantArt is a great platform for interacting with other artists and growing your skills, as well as helping others do the same. Critiques may be exchanged in many ways: in a forum or journal post, in the normal deviation comments, via private Note, or even via chat. Be aware that if you don't have a Core Membership, you can still ask for critique - just say so in your deviation description or make a post about it! :)
It's important, however, to rememb
Art Advice Issue #6 - Dealing with Art Block
There's something really important to keep in mind: "Art Block" is a mental state, and, as such, it is temporary and you can overcome it!

The term "art block" is misleading, because it makes you think it has one definition, when, in fact, it is a term used to refer to several quite different situations. Here, we'll talk about the different types of art block and how to overcome them.
Star!  TYPE 1 - I WANT TO DRAW, BUT I DON'T KNOW WHAT!
This is the easiest type of art block to deal with. DRAW ANYTHING! It doesn't have to be something spectacular; drawing an object on your desk or in your room will do; it will help you break out of this art block. Here are some ideas for you:
Ask your friends or watchers or random people for suggestions. You don't have to draw all of them; just take the ones that seem appealing to you.Draw random objects: dec
Art Advice Issue #5 - How to Find your Own Style
By far the most common concern I see people on DA mention is, "I wish I had my own style / How can I get my own style?" Hardly a week goes by when I don't see different people saying this. Because of this, I decided to write this article with some tips people may find useful, when searching for a style to call their own. This is what I did, ten years ago, when I was trying to find my own manga style; and I've mentioned this method to some other people and they found it informative and useful as well, so I'm sharing it with you all.
The first part of this article will talk about what is included in what we call "style" (did you know personal style is also found in realism?) and the reasons behind common stylizations (as commonly seen in anime and manga).
The second part talks about how an artist arrives at his or her style, and describes a method you can use if you don't want to wait for your style to surface organically ... in other words, if you wa
Tips for Photographing Traditional Artwork
A more advanced expansion on my "Basic Tips" article, Basic Tips to Make your Art Look Better. First, let us recap on those basics:
TIPS FOR PHOTOGRAPHING ARTWORK:
Make sure your picture is laid out flat, either lying flat on your desk or attached to a wall. Minimize wrinkles. Set your camera perpendicular (at a 90-degree angle) to your picture. You can use the paper or the canvas' edges as guides against your camera's display to align the picture properly.Unless you have a DSLR with an adjustable flash and are well versed in flash photography, do not use a flash.Take the photo in a well-lit area.
This probably doesn't work if you use a phone camera, but if you use a regular camera and your hands aren't steady enough, set your camera on a pile of book (or use a tripod if you have one) to keep it steady, and use the timer to take the phot
Basic Tips to Make your Art Look Better
This month's article is a two-parter; one with basic presentation tips for different media, and one with more advanced suggestions for photographing traditional art. For the more advanced article, see here: Tips for Photographing Traditional Artwork
This part s super basic and requires no skill whatsoever, but for people who do this, it REALLY helps your art look better, when displaying online, and minimizes rejections from Groups.
I. ALL MEDIA - MAKE YOUR OWN WATERMARK OR SIGNATURE

Identifying your work is important, but the DA watermark (although it is a nice service to have) is not the best way to go about it. Even though it is easy to apply, unless you have a huge following already, you're hurting yourself more than you're protecting yourself by using it. It's very large and in the center, hurting the visibility and appeal of your work. You've spent a lot of time on your drawing or phot
Art Advice Issue #3 - Advancing in Art: The 3 Ps
For people who are new at art, or new at a different medium.
Keeping what I call "the three Ps" in mind will help you power through and not quit before you've reached your goal.
I. - PRACTICE
It sounds cliché, but practicing is necessary; not just for art, but for everything. Much like athletes spend years in the youth levels, learning the skills, before they can become professionals... and then even when they're pros, they go to training every day, to hone their skills. Just like they do, so, too, must an artist practice.
Footballer fella (Sports) Da Vinci Fella (Artists)  
Practice can be anything. It doesn't mean you must shade so many spheres before you can-- no! You can shake it up! You practice and hone your skills with every drawing you make. You can practice drawing your OCs, your pet, your favorite piece of decoration in your house. Practice with s
Art Advice #2 - How to Have a Positive Outlook
When doing art, we know what we want something to look like. When it doesn't turn out the way we want it to, it's easy to fall into the trap of feeling discouraged. But don't!!
:bulletyellow: First, if it gives you some consolation, know the fact that everyone screws up sometimes, even professionals. People just tend to not show their screw-ups, so it's easy to make the false assumption that everything they do is wonderful and they never mess up. Just because you didn't see it doesn't mean it didn't happen. Mistakes and product the artist doesn't like happen to everyone at all levels. It's completely normal!
:bulletyellow: Change your outlook about mistakes. When we draw something that doesn't come out how we intended it, keeping these two things in mind will help you move forward:Every time something doesn't come out "right," we get one step closer to getting to the point where it does come out just the w
Don't Let Anyone Make you Feel Bad About your Art
INSPIRATIONAL ART ADVICE JOURNALS - ISSUE #1
DON'T LET ANYONE MAKE YOU FEEL BAD ABOUT YOUR ART + ASSUMPTIONS AND DIFFERENT ARTISTIC VISIONS

I see so many people with destructive rather than constructive comments on people's art or even general styles of art. In my [previous journal entry], I mentioned how, if you're doing art for your own enjoyment, the only person your art has to please is yourself, and I mentioned about people having different artistic visions.  Since my return to DA, I have seen many people being made to feel insecure about their art. Here's a very old anecdote that I'm using just for illustrative purposes here, and hopefully it will inspire you to not give up...
Back when I was in elementary school, I'd made this little painting for art class (the assignment was to paint whatever we wanted) and was insanely proud of it, thought it was


Feature: Masquerade

Journal Entry: Tue Oct 31, 2017, 11:00 AM
Gondola by brighnasa
masquerade ... by MoniqueDeCaroMasquerade by IllustratedEye
starry mask by fresh4uLace Masquerade by KimJSinclair
Dreamer Mask: Emergence (3D Printed) by Lumecluster
Gentlemanly Masquerade by Serain
Behind the Mask by kyu-to
Apple Blossom Leather Mask by windfalcon
Untitled by LeraStyajkina
Masquerade by Gold-SevenJason todd detail by jiuge
Phantom by IrulanaCarnivore Couture by girltripped
silver feather mask by w-l-gChat noir Cosplay by ShunsukeCosplay
Daydream by la-esmeraldaNightwing46 by LKiKAi
Masquerade Shae by kittyalystQuilling Mask by GwynConawayArt
silent by RyukiGaryu
CAPTAIN MARVEL - RESURRECTION by ISIKOLEzio Carnival Mask by Ninjatic
Force Captain Catra by Scebiqu
Mysterious by Ciril
Curtain call by SUPARIOVenice Carnival 2009 - 13 by flemmens
COMM: Ragnarok - Kagerou Haruyoshi by pauldng
The Last Dance Of The Butterfly by irbi-art
What is left behind by AlexAidonidis
Masquerade by ArcindrusAthena Mask by OakMyth
Young Zeus - King of Gods at his prime by Crimson-Seal
Music of the Night by SugarSprinkledWalrus
Happy Halloween by Y-n-Y
FanArt Yasuo by OrekiGenya
Venetian masks 2 by flemmens
JOJO's bizarre adventure -Kakyouin- by DADAIST-GabrielReita (Dogma) watercolor  by AnaiAsane
Masquerade by Lighane
Angemon! by mangamieFANTOMEX by Danart-comic
Brass Mask Swan + Svarowski II by FantasyForgeLARP
COMMISSION - Roman and Juli by ElyonBlackStar
Revenant by GraceZhu


:bademoticon:  Index of Past Feature Journals :bademoticon: 


Lovely Watchers Series: pt. 6 | pt. 5 | pt. 4 | pt. 3 | pt. 2 | pt. 1
Colors Series: Black & White | Black | Feeling Fresh | Brown | Beige, Gold, Honey Hues | Green | Pink | Purple | Yellow, Orange, Red | Blue | White
Other Features: Dreams Come True | Female & Flowers | Landscapes & Places | Donuts | Food & Drink | Christmas | Art of Succulents | Artful Sketches | Tools of the Trade | Foxes | Cute Stuff | The Sea | Fanart: Sephiroth | Photography: Still Life | Subject: Male | Subject: Animals | Photography: Flowers & Plants | Theme: Cute Halloween
Bonus: Cute Pears of Salamanca!

Feature: Theme: Dreams Come True

Journal Entry: Mon Aug 28, 2017, 11:00 AM
Create by JailHouseRock2
Painting is alive by NeskvikPygmalion by SteveDeLaMare
LostKids_contest by Unodu
Imagination Reimagined by kelleybean86Some page in my sketchbook by deerfox-art
Art is Wild by nakanoart
Imagination by AndolediusThe Jungle Book by Picolo-kun
Crescendo by Jesar
Irri with Ink by oshREDA Fierce Imagination by JennaleeAuclair
Commission: Welcome To My World by MisterLIAR
[168] Visionary by mcptatoTo Life by raiyneofgailin
Imagination by Mauricio Abril by MauricioAbril
Imagination by fandygembuk
Magic Book by deerfox-artInspiration by Zzanthia
painting dragon by breath-art
Story Time by AlectorFencer
Home and the Fairies by zancanWhat Is Your Imagination? by Levianee
Lion, lynx and wolf by GaudiBuendia
COME ALIVE by Martystar
NARUTO- Sai by fisher903Sculptor by kir-tat
Sai by shizen1102
Come to Life by DreamerWhit


:skyblue-orb: Index of Past Feature Journals :skyblue-orb:


Lovely Watchers Series: pt. 6 | pt. 5 | pt. 4 | pt. 3 | pt. 2 | pt. 1
Colors Series: Black & White | Black | Feeling Fresh | Brown | Beige, Gold, Honey Hues | Green | Pink | Purple | Yellow, Orange, Red | Blue | White
Other Features: Female & Flowers | Landscapes & Places | Donuts | Food & Drink | Christmas | Art of Succulents | Artful Sketches | Tools of the Trade | Foxes | Cute Stuff | The Sea | Fanart: Sephiroth | Photography: Still Life | Subject: Male | Subject: Animals | Photography: Flowers & Plants | Theme: Cute Halloween
Bonus: Cute Pears of Salamanca!

Featured Faves: Female and Flowers

Journal Entry: Mon Aug 14, 2017, 11:00 AM
Spring by NerinFox
At Peace by GabrielleBrickeyQueen in the North by venquian
Quince blossom by Guelde-rose55Carnaval lady by AlexGreenArt
Mirkwood daisy by kimberly80
Bath by Katie-WatersellPorcelain by Vasylissa
09 - M.i.n.n.i.e. by slirg27Lady Dynamite by auraboo
Portrait Study. by chaosringenblack beauty by Fuytski
Lanyra by Zephyri
Succulent sketches 1 by sunsetagain
A branch of ivy by kosharik69
Calopsia by WanderingLola
Jasmines by indigoatmosphereHimeru by Farisato
Yellow Rose - WIP by Shelter85
Aurora by yaileginger by yasa-himeBeleaguered Constance adv by Toru-meow
Girl Portrait by leejun35Sk_02 by LagunayaMoon Festival by kaiser-mony
Gentle - Sketch by AaronGriffinArtTempestad.   updated by virnagrayBeauty Beyond Size by Skadivore
Lily of the valley by lazygirl-292017-04-19 Orchid by jackfox2008

:skyblue-orb: Index of Past Feature Journals :skyblue-orb:


Lovely Watchers Series: pt. 6 | pt. 5 | pt. 4 | pt. 3 | pt. 2 | pt. 1
Colors Series: Black & White | Black | Feeling Fresh | Brown | Beige, Gold, Honey Hues | Green | Pink | Purple | Yellow, Orange, Red | Blue | White
Other Features: Landscapes & Places | Donuts | Food & Drink | Christmas | Art of Succulents | Artful Sketches | Tools of the Trade | Foxes | Cute Stuff | The Sea | Fanart: Sephiroth | Photography: Still Life | Subject: Male | Subject: Animals | Photography: Flowers & Plants | Theme: Cute Halloween
Bonus: Cute Pears of Salamanca!

Featured Faves: Landscapes and Places

Journal Entry: Tue Jul 4, 2017, 4:00 PM
Hidden Lagoon by JKRoots
Daily Painting 20/50 by andreasrochaMaking Of Water by Victorior
Beyond the path by Tohad
Lost Woods by ValaSedaiSacred Place by rajewel
Enchanted Forest by cat-o-morphism
Paper Seaworld by PoonieFoxThe hotel by Hupopo
Himeji castle by Artkawa
The Climb by paikan07Wat Rong Khun by DrewHopper
Limbo by ElyneNoir
Ominous edge by MasterTeacher
Red-Temple-Gate by TomPrante
Tonnara in Scopello by sanderusDay 215 Day 216 by shelaghcully
Cosa by Ira-Nanda
Mayan Tower by thegryph
Whiterun, Skyrim WIP 6 by MaggieKanForest WIP by Michelle-Winer
The Sunny Spot by LhuinTest 23 by angelitoonLore page wip by moodymod
Driving this road down to Paradise by Miguel-Santos
Spring by MindShelves
Zen by djahal
Sunset paradise by virnagrayOTRA DEL INEA by ciclomono
Landscape Study 1 by Nidhogge
Vibrant Mission by rooze23
Bakery by MKageEdge by reikureii
The Canyon by stevegoad
Teatr Lalek-Wroclaw, Watercolor by Andrzej-KorytkowskiMorning Street by Klegs
Tavira by jjpeabody
Alexander and Main by LaurazeeStar dust over the mountains!!! by virnagray
.:Treehouse:. by TAyamiLooking Over A Cliff by Bella-Marinelli
M. XIII by Sand-GaleBunny by Sand-Gale
Bear and Northern Lights by taibossigaiAdrasan by m-eralp
Quintet for GraceMusic by Ebineyland

:skyblue-orb: Index of Past Feature Journals :skyblue-orb:


Lovely Watchers Series: pt. 6 | pt. 5 | pt. 4 | pt. 3 | pt. 2 | pt. 1
Colors Series: Black & White | Black | Feeling Fresh | Brown | Beige, Gold, Honey Hues | Green | Pink | Purple | Yellow, Orange, Red | Blue | White
Other Features: Donuts | Food & Drink | Christmas | Art of Succulents | Artful Sketches | Tools of the Trade | Foxes | Cute Stuff | The Sea | Fanart: Sephiroth | Photography: Still Life | Subject: Male | Subject: Animals | Photography: Flowers & Plants | Theme: Cute Halloween
Bonus: Cute Pears of Salamanca!

Future Art Advice Article Topics?

Journal Entry: Sun Jul 2, 2017, 9:35 PM
Header07 by barananduen

Please suggest topics you'd like to see covered in the future, and if it's something I can do, I'll prepare an article about it. I'm asking because I'm almost out of topic ideas. I do have a couple more, but I'm not sure about them.

You can ask me about art in general or about a medium in particular, or even about DA, I guess Shrug ... What's something you guys need help with?
I've written the previous ones based on common concerns I've noticed while browsing DA, or things I've noticed a lot of people could use, but short of "How can I get a job in the industry?" or "How do I get into my favorite art school?" (which I cannot answer), I'm out of common problems.

What we have so far:
Art Advice Issue #8 - Random Traditional Art Tips
GENERAL
:new: * If you draw or paint on a table, keep a paper tissue under your drawing hand to keep the oils in your skin from transferring to the paper (this happens even if you've just washed your hands), which may keep the pigments from being properly absorbed in some places.
DRAWING
* To check for errors in your sketch, especially those relating to symmetry, rotate your canvas and place it on each of its sides, step away and look at it. Also, take a photo or scan it, and do a horizontal flip on the image with your computer.
* To easily transfer your sketch onto watercolor paper, board, wood, or other surface, color the back side of your sketch (scan and print it onto regular printer paper if it's in your sketchbook) with a graphite pencil (2B works fine, HB is harder to transfer), tape it graphite-side-down to your watercolor paper, and go over the lines with a pen or sharp pencil. This works like carbon paper
Art Advice #7: How to Ask for + Provide Critique
Critique - if asked for and provided correctly - can be beneficial and doesn't have to hurt. Here, we'll talk about some things to keep in mind when asking for as well as when providing critique.
I.    For both the artist and the critiquer - Opening notes
II.   For the artist requesting critique / improvement help
III.  For the person providing critique
IV.   Closing remarks
I. FOR THE ARTIST AND THE CRITIQUER - OPENING NOTES
DeviantArt is a great platform for interacting with other artists and growing your skills, as well as helping others do the same. Critiques may be exchanged in many ways: in a forum or journal post, in the normal deviation comments, via private Note, or even via chat. Be aware that if you don't have a Core Membership, you can still ask for critique - just say so in your deviation description or make a post about it! :)
It's important, however, to rememb
Art Advice Issue #6 - Dealing with Art Block
There's something really important to keep in mind: "Art Block" is a mental state, and, as such, it is temporary and you can overcome it!

The term "art block" is misleading, because it makes you think it has one definition, when, in fact, it is a term used to refer to several quite different situations. Here, we'll talk about the different types of art block and how to overcome them.
Star!  TYPE 1 - I WANT TO DRAW, BUT I DON'T KNOW WHAT!
This is the easiest type of art block to deal with. DRAW ANYTHING! It doesn't have to be something spectacular; drawing an object on your desk or in your room will do; it will help you break out of this art block. Here are some ideas for you:
Ask your friends or watchers or random people for suggestions. You don't have to draw all of them; just take the ones that seem appealing to you.Draw random objects: dec
Art Advice Issue #5 - How to Find your Own Style
By far the most common concern I see people on DA mention is, "I wish I had my own style / How can I get my own style?" Hardly a week goes by when I don't see different people saying this. Because of this, I decided to write this article with some tips people may find useful, when searching for a style to call their own. This is what I did, ten years ago, when I was trying to find my own manga style; and I've mentioned this method to some other people and they found it informative and useful as well, so I'm sharing it with you all.
The first part of this article will talk about what is included in what we call "style" (did you know personal style is also found in realism?) and the reasons behind common stylizations (as commonly seen in anime and manga).
The second part talks about how an artist arrives at his or her style, and describes a method you can use if you don't want to wait for your style to surface organically ... in other words, if you wa
Tips for Photographing Traditional Artwork
A more advanced expansion on my "Basic Tips" article, Basic Tips to Make your Art Look Better. First, let us recap on those basics:
TIPS FOR PHOTOGRAPHING ARTWORK:
Make sure your picture is laid out flat, either lying flat on your desk or attached to a wall. Minimize wrinkles. Set your camera perpendicular (at a 90-degree angle) to your picture. You can use the paper or the canvas' edges as guides against your camera's display to align the picture properly.Unless you have a DSLR with an adjustable flash and are well versed in flash photography, do not use a flash.Take the photo in a well-lit area.
This probably doesn't work if you use a phone camera, but if you use a regular camera and your hands aren't steady enough, set your camera on a pile of book (or use a tripod if you have one) to keep it steady, and use the timer to take the phot
Basic Tips to Make your Art Look Better
This month's article is a two-parter; one with basic presentation tips for different media, and one with more advanced suggestions for photographing traditional art. For the more advanced article, see here: Tips for Photographing Traditional Artwork
This part s super basic and requires no skill whatsoever, but for people who do this, it REALLY helps your art look better, when displaying online, and minimizes rejections from Groups.
I. ALL MEDIA - MAKE YOUR OWN WATERMARK OR SIGNATURE

Identifying your work is important, but the DA watermark (although it is a nice service to have) is not the best way to go about it. Even though it is easy to apply, unless you have a huge following already, you're hurting yourself more than you're protecting yourself by using it. It's very large and in the center, hurting the visibility and appeal of your work. You've spent a lot of time on your drawing or phot
Art Advice Issue #3 - Advancing in Art: The 3 Ps
For people who are new at art, or new at a different medium.
Keeping what I call "the three Ps" in mind will help you power through and not quit before you've reached your goal.
I. - PRACTICE
It sounds cliché, but practicing is necessary; not just for art, but for everything. Much like athletes spend years in the youth levels, learning the skills, before they can become professionals... and then even when they're pros, they go to training every day, to hone their skills. Just like they do, so, too, must an artist practice.
Footballer fella (Sports) Da Vinci Fella (Artists)  
Practice can be anything. It doesn't mean you must shade so many spheres before you can-- no! You can shake it up! You practice and hone your skills with every drawing you make. You can practice drawing your OCs, your pet, your favorite piece of decoration in your house. Practice with s
Art Advice #2 - How to Have a Positive Outlook
When doing art, we know what we want something to look like. When it doesn't turn out the way we want it to, it's easy to fall into the trap of feeling discouraged. But don't!!
:bulletyellow: First, if it gives you some consolation, know the fact that everyone screws up sometimes, even professionals. People just tend to not show their screw-ups, so it's easy to make the false assumption that everything they do is wonderful and they never mess up. Just because you didn't see it doesn't mean it didn't happen. Mistakes and product the artist doesn't like happen to everyone at all levels. It's completely normal!
:bulletyellow: Change your outlook about mistakes. When we draw something that doesn't come out how we intended it, keeping these two things in mind will help you move forward:Every time something doesn't come out "right," we get one step closer to getting to the point where it does come out just the w
Don't Let Anyone Make you Feel Bad About your Art
INSPIRATIONAL ART ADVICE JOURNALS - ISSUE #1
DON'T LET ANYONE MAKE YOU FEEL BAD ABOUT YOUR ART + ASSUMPTIONS AND DIFFERENT ARTISTIC VISIONS

I see so many people with destructive rather than constructive comments on people's art or even general styles of art. In my [previous journal entry], I mentioned how, if you're doing art for your own enjoyment, the only person your art has to please is yourself, and I mentioned about people having different artistic visions.  Since my return to DA, I have seen many people being made to feel insecure about their art. Here's a very old anecdote that I'm using just for illustrative purposes here, and hopefully it will inspire you to not give up...
Back when I was in elementary school, I'd made this little painting for art class (the assignment was to paint whatever we wanted) and was insanely proud of it, thought it was
Common Questions by New DA Members
NOTE: Locations of buttons, as mentioned here, are for the web version of DeviantArt. The app is laid out differently, and buttons may be in different locations or missing altogether.
1. How to properly reply to someone's message. Chat Speech Bubble Emote Whai hai thar :hai: 
This is not a question, but I see about half of new deviants doing this wrong (including myself, when I first joined). When you want to reply to someone's comment, be sure to use the Reply button, which ensures the other person receives your reply in their inbox. If you don't do this, the other person will not be notified of your reply, and will never realize you did so.
2. What are llama badges?  llama walk 
Llama badges are just for fun, and are one of DA's traditions. They are free to give to others, and a great way


Art Advice #7: How to Ask for + Provide Critique

Journal Entry: Sun May 28, 2017, 11:19 AM
Header07 by barananduen

Critique - if asked for and provided correctly - can be beneficial and doesn't have to hurt. Here, we'll talk about some things to keep in mind when asking for as well as when providing critique.

I.    For both the artist and the critiquer - Opening notes
II.   For the artist requesting critique / improvement help
III.  For the person providing critique
IV.   Closing remarks

I. FOR THE ARTIST AND THE CRITIQUER - OPENING NOTES


DeviantArt is a great platform for interacting with other artists and growing your skills, as well as helping others do the same. Critiques may be exchanged in many ways: in a forum or journal post, in the normal deviation comments, via private Note, or even via chat. Be aware that if you don't have a Core Membership, you can still ask for critique - just say so in your deviation description or make a post about it! :)

It's important, however, to remember that people on DA vary greatly from one another in terms of their art - by art genre, skills, and age, of course, but also by goals. Not everyone is working toward getting into art school or making a career out of art. However, people who make art for their own enjoyment often want to improve their art as well, and may ask for and receive critique. (Remember that the terms "amateur" and "hobbyist," just like the term "professional," refer to career, and not to skill level.)

Now, let's look at the actual process of critiquing...


II. FOR THE ARTIST REQUESTING CRITIQUE / IMPROVEMENT HELP


First, make sure you are honestly open to people pointing out mistakes in your work. People here sometimes confuse the terms "critique" and "feedback" - they're not the same thing. While critique is a type of feedback, the essence of critique is pointing out the work's deficiencies as well as its strengths. That said, comments that only point out a work's strengths are NOT useless, but this is not the topic we're addressing here.

More often than not, and especially in the forums, I see people asking for help like this: "Hello. I have been doing art for [amount of time] and feel like I'm not getting better. How can I improve?" And nothing more. Usually, without even a sample of their work posted in the topic. (SPOILER! By doing this, you've just wasted a chance at getting useful information tailored to you specifically.)

Asking for improvement tips is great, and many people here are willing to provide them. However, to better reap the rewards of this opportunity, you need to help people help you.

Topics where you are specific in your request are way more successful than more general ones, since they result in advice that is geared to your particular art level and goals.

Here is a list of things that you should include in your critique request to better guide your potential helpers:

CRITIQUE REQUEST CHECKLIST
  1. Post examples of your current work that show the problem you're having. This is really important! Use the :thumb: codes; don't just link to your gallery - the easier you make it for people to help you, the more willing they will be to do so. If you don't want to upload a work to your gallery (or scraps), use your sta.sh! :) You can still embed images as thumbnails if they're in your sta.sh - just paste the full sta.sh URL.

  2. Explain what, specifically, you do not like about your current work - what you want help with.

  3. Point out what you do like about your current work, so people won't tell you to change things you're happy with.

  4. Describe what look you want to achieve (your artistic vision). For example:
    • Are you aiming for realistic shading (which is not exclusive to realistic drawings, and can be - and often is - applied to stylized drawings just the same) or some other style of shading?

    • Would you like to make action scenes that show full body and full- and detailed-background/environments, or is your preferred type of art something else? Not everybody wants to make the same type of art - describe what kind of art YOU want to make.

    This is particularly important if you're asking the general public for help, since they're not familiar with what type of art you do and what type of art you like.

    If you don't describe what you're shooting for, people will have to rely on assumptions that might not suit you.

  5. If you want CC on a particular piece/drawing, make your request as specific as possible and state whether you're open to redlines.

  6. Also when requesting CC on a particular piece: Is there a certain mood you want the piece to have, or a certain reaction you want to inspire in your viewers (what do you want them to think/feel? "This is awesome!" doesn't count ;) lol, that's a given. ;p )


Finally, when someone responds to your request and spends time helping you, it's common courtesy to acknowledge their assistance. Let them know you really read what they wrote; don't reply with just "thx" [three letters, END OF MESSAGE!] ("k" :| ) or leave them hanging with no reply at all. People took time away from doing things for themselves, their family or friends (or even their clients) to help you; take a moment to reply to them.

Of course, the internet is full of trolls, and not everyone is out there to help you. The first C in "CC" stands for constructive, and it's supposed to help you, not be destructive. You sometimes get random strangers (they usually are) with things like, "This has mistakes" (and nothing else) "Learn to draw!" or "This is really ugly/Ew!/This is [insert expletive]" "Ugh, more [genre] trash" (I've seen all of these on DA). Those people just want to make you feel bad, and nothing else, even if they claim they're trying to help you. Just ignore them.

NOTE: This is off-topic, but it's worth reminding people. I often see people who think learning art is a quick process, that they'll learn it all and be good with just a few months' worth of practice. It doesn't work that way. Art, like anything else, takes time to master. Be patient with yourself! See: Art Advice Issue #3 - Advancing in Art: The 3 Ps


III. FOR THE PERSON PROVIDING CRITIQUE


A good critique points out both strengths and weaknesses, and takes into consideration context, content, and delivery. It is therefore important to try to understand where the artist is coming from, what they want to achieve, and to pay attention to what advice you give and how you give it.

Here are some things to keep in mind:
  • First, make sure that the person is open to critique. (Have they explicitly asked for it?) Unsolicited critique may be ill received. Even if you, personally, think everything that's posted should be critiqued, remember that not everyone thinks the same way, nor should they.

  • Be polite. A polite critique is not any less true or helpful than a roughly worded one (and is more likely to be received well, and, as a result, be helpful).

    An important part of any communication is delivery, not just content. It's similar to telling someone "Sorry! I can't go to your thing; I'm swamped with work," vs. "I don't have time for you; sod off!" It reflects badly only on you, to be honest. And if you're a jerk, it's completely warranted if the person doesn't thank you.

  • Remember that the rules you apply to your own art (eg: "X needs to be realistic/scientifically possible") cannot and should not be forced on other artists (eg: if someone, knowingly, wants to draw spines bending in ways that are realistically impossible, they're free to do it). Art is, after all, about creativity. You can mention it, if you want, to prod whether it was done knowingly or not, but if they're doing it on purpose, it's their right to do so.

  • Take into consideration the person's level, artistic preferences, and goals. Do not assume they're similar to your own.

  • Make sure you understand, as much as possible, what the artist wants help with and what they want to achieve with their art (in terms of aesthetics, and, if applicable, also in terms of purpose). Look at the checklist in Section II. above - if their request does not include these items, and you feel it would be helpful if it did, ask them to provide that information.

  • Be specific with your suggestions. General things like "Study anatomy/color theory/perspective/etc." are not helpful if the person cannot see what in their drawing made you say that. It's like a person not understanding the interaction between air friction (etc.) and a falling object (and not knowing that they don't) and someone replying with just "Study physics!" They'll be just as lost before that comment as they were before.

    Reply, instead, with something like this: "The left arm is too short for realistic anatomy. When extended, the wrist should reach the bottom of the buttocks." You can do this either just verbally or with the aid of a redline, if they're open to it.

    Then you can link them to a tutorial or book, if you want, but make sure you've given them some sort of orientation first.

  • Tell them what they're doing well, too. This is not "sugar-coating." Oftentimes, people don't realize what their strengths are (and they won't if no one tells them!), and may erroneously think they're doing those things wrong, too, and change them.

  • Critique does not have to be a one-way communication. If you want, feel free to sound ideas off of the artist, regarding their work, and turn it into a brainstorming session. Of course, this is up to you and how much time you want to or can dedicate to the activity!



IV. CLOSING REMARKS


By paying attention to both how critique is requested, as well as to how it is given, we, as artists, can both grow and help others to do the same. Communication skills are important. When engaging in critique sessions online, take the time to reread what you have written before you click Send, and put yourself in the other person's shoes. Does my critique request have the necessary information for people to help me? Is my critique open-minded enough to suit people with goals and experiences different from my own?


Thanks for reading, and I hope this article has been, in some way, useful. :heart: If you have any requests for future Art Advice Articles, feel free to either post it in the comments or send me a note.

Until next time!
Heart Balloon Emote 


OTHER ART ADVICE ISSUES:


Art Advice Issue #8 - Random Traditional Art Tips
GENERAL
:new: * If you draw or paint on a table, keep a paper tissue under your drawing hand to keep the oils in your skin from transferring to the paper (this happens even if you've just washed your hands), which may keep the pigments from being properly absorbed in some places.
DRAWING
* To check for errors in your sketch, especially those relating to symmetry, rotate your canvas and place it on each of its sides, step away and look at it. Also, take a photo or scan it, and do a horizontal flip on the image with your computer.
* To easily transfer your sketch onto watercolor paper, board, wood, or other surface, color the back side of your sketch (scan and print it onto regular printer paper if it's in your sketchbook) with a graphite pencil (2B works fine, HB is harder to transfer), tape it graphite-side-down to your watercolor paper, and go over the lines with a pen or sharp pencil. This works like carbon paper
Art Advice Issue #6 - Dealing with Art Block
There's something really important to keep in mind: "Art Block" is a mental state, and, as such, it is temporary and you can overcome it!

The term "art block" is misleading, because it makes you think it has one definition, when, in fact, it is a term used to refer to several quite different situations. Here, we'll talk about the different types of art block and how to overcome them.
Star!  TYPE 1 - I WANT TO DRAW, BUT I DON'T KNOW WHAT!
This is the easiest type of art block to deal with. DRAW ANYTHING! It doesn't have to be something spectacular; drawing an object on your desk or in your room will do; it will help you break out of this art block. Here are some ideas for you:
Ask your friends or watchers or random people for suggestions. You don't have to draw all of them; just take the ones that seem appealing to you.Draw random objects: dec
Art Advice Issue #5 - How to Find your Own Style
By far the most common concern I see people on DA mention is, "I wish I had my own style / How can I get my own style?" Hardly a week goes by when I don't see different people saying this. Because of this, I decided to write this article with some tips people may find useful, when searching for a style to call their own. This is what I did, ten years ago, when I was trying to find my own manga style; and I've mentioned this method to some other people and they found it informative and useful as well, so I'm sharing it with you all.
The first part of this article will talk about what is included in what we call "style" (did you know personal style is also found in realism?) and the reasons behind common stylizations (as commonly seen in anime and manga).
The second part talks about how an artist arrives at his or her style, and describes a method you can use if you don't want to wait for your style to surface organically ... in other words, if you wa
Tips for Photographing Traditional Artwork
A more advanced expansion on my "Basic Tips" article, Basic Tips to Make your Art Look Better. First, let us recap on those basics:
TIPS FOR PHOTOGRAPHING ARTWORK:
Make sure your picture is laid out flat, either lying flat on your desk or attached to a wall. Minimize wrinkles. Set your camera perpendicular (at a 90-degree angle) to your picture. You can use the paper or the canvas' edges as guides against your camera's display to align the picture properly.Unless you have a DSLR with an adjustable flash and are well versed in flash photography, do not use a flash.Take the photo in a well-lit area.
This probably doesn't work if you use a phone camera, but if you use a regular camera and your hands aren't steady enough, set your camera on a pile of book (or use a tripod if you have one) to keep it steady, and use the timer to take the phot
Basic Tips to Make your Art Look Better
This month's article is a two-parter; one with basic presentation tips for different media, and one with more advanced suggestions for photographing traditional art. For the more advanced article, see here: Tips for Photographing Traditional Artwork
This part s super basic and requires no skill whatsoever, but for people who do this, it REALLY helps your art look better, when displaying online, and minimizes rejections from Groups.
I. ALL MEDIA - MAKE YOUR OWN WATERMARK OR SIGNATURE

Identifying your work is important, but the DA watermark (although it is a nice service to have) is not the best way to go about it. Even though it is easy to apply, unless you have a huge following already, you're hurting yourself more than you're protecting yourself by using it. It's very large and in the center, hurting the visibility and appeal of your work. You've spent a lot of time on your drawing or phot
Art Advice Issue #3 - Advancing in Art: The 3 Ps
For people who are new at art, or new at a different medium.
Keeping what I call "the three Ps" in mind will help you power through and not quit before you've reached your goal.
I. - PRACTICE
It sounds cliché, but practicing is necessary; not just for art, but for everything. Much like athletes spend years in the youth levels, learning the skills, before they can become professionals... and then even when they're pros, they go to training every day, to hone their skills. Just like they do, so, too, must an artist practice.
Footballer fella (Sports) Da Vinci Fella (Artists)  
Practice can be anything. It doesn't mean you must shade so many spheres before you can-- no! You can shake it up! You practice and hone your skills with every drawing you make. You can practice drawing your OCs, your pet, your favorite piece of decoration in your house. Practice with s
Art Advice #2 - How to Have a Positive Outlook
When doing art, we know what we want something to look like. When it doesn't turn out the way we want it to, it's easy to fall into the trap of feeling discouraged. But don't!!
:bulletyellow: First, if it gives you some consolation, know the fact that everyone screws up sometimes, even professionals. People just tend to not show their screw-ups, so it's easy to make the false assumption that everything they do is wonderful and they never mess up. Just because you didn't see it doesn't mean it didn't happen. Mistakes and product the artist doesn't like happen to everyone at all levels. It's completely normal!
:bulletyellow: Change your outlook about mistakes. When we draw something that doesn't come out how we intended it, keeping these two things in mind will help you move forward:Every time something doesn't come out "right," we get one step closer to getting to the point where it does come out just the w
Don't Let Anyone Make you Feel Bad About your Art
INSPIRATIONAL ART ADVICE JOURNALS - ISSUE #1
DON'T LET ANYONE MAKE YOU FEEL BAD ABOUT YOUR ART + ASSUMPTIONS AND DIFFERENT ARTISTIC VISIONS

I see so many people with destructive rather than constructive comments on people's art or even general styles of art. In my [previous journal entry], I mentioned how, if you're doing art for your own enjoyment, the only person your art has to please is yourself, and I mentioned about people having different artistic visions.  Since my return to DA, I have seen many people being made to feel insecure about their art. Here's a very old anecdote that I'm using just for illustrative purposes here, and hopefully it will inspire you to not give up...
Back when I was in elementary school, I'd made this little painting for art class (the assignment was to paint whatever we wanted) and was insanely proud of it, thought it was


OTHER RESOURCE JOURNALS:
Common Questions by New DA Members
NOTE: Locations of buttons, as mentioned here, are for the web version of DeviantArt. The app is laid out differently, and buttons may be in different locations or missing altogether.
1. How to properly reply to someone's message. Chat Speech Bubble Emote Whai hai thar :hai: 
This is not a question, but I see about half of new deviants doing this wrong (including myself, when I first joined). When you want to reply to someone's comment, be sure to use the Reply button, which ensures the other person receives your reply in their inbox. If you don't do this, the other person will not be notified of your reply, and will never realize you did so.
2. What are llama badges?  llama walk 
Llama badges are just for fun, and are one of DA's traditions. They are free to give to others, and a great way


 You can always find a direct link to these articles in the "Art Inspiration Corner" widget on the bottom right corner of my profile page and in the "Resources for you" section of my gallery.

Feature: Donuts!

Journal Entry: Tue Apr 18, 2017, 11:55 AM



:skyblue-orb: Index of Past Feature Journals :skyblue-orb:


Lovely Watchers Series: pt. 6 | pt. 5 | pt. 4 | pt. 3 | pt. 2 | pt. 1
Colors Series: Black & White | Black | Feeling Fresh | Brown | Beige, Gold, Honey Hues | Green | Pink | Purple | Yellow, Orange, Red | Blue | White
Other Features: Food & Drink | Christmas | Art of Succulents | Artful Sketches | Tools of the Trade | Foxes | Cute Stuff | The Sea | Fanart: Sephiroth | Photography: Still Life | Subject: Male | Subject: Animals | Photography: Flowers & Plants | Theme: Cute Halloween
Bonus: Cute Pears of Salamanca!


Next feature: May 9th

Common Questions by New DA Members

Journal Entry: Fri Apr 7, 2017, 12:00 PM
header02 by barananduen


NOTE: Locations of buttons, as mentioned here, are for the web version of DeviantArt. The app is laid out differently, and buttons may be in different locations or missing altogether.

1. How to properly reply to someone's message. Chat Speech Bubble Emote Whai hai thar :hai: 


This is not a question, but I see about half of new deviants doing this wrong (including myself, when I first joined). When you want to reply to someone's comment, be sure to use the Reply button, which ensures the other person receives your reply in their inbox. If you don't do this, the other person will not be notified of your reply, and will never realize you did so.



2. What are llama badges?  llama walk 


Llama badges are just for fun, and are one of DA's traditions. They are free to give to others, and a great way to say "thank you" or "hi."
As you collect more llamas, your llama badge "levels up" and the badge in your profile page changes in appearance. These are the different llama levels currently available:
Llama Levels by TheStockWarehouse
Even though llamas are free to give, some people may pay you points Points to buy them. These trade offers are visible, when available, in your badges page, on the far right side, under "Recent Offers." When one such offer is available, you will see a small table with a user's avatar, the number of points they're giving per llama received, and a blue "Give llama badge" link. If you click on the blue link and the transaction is successful, you will automatically receive the stated amount of points.



3. How do I get points?  Catch them points 


Points are DA's currency. You can obtain them in a number of different ways:
  • Purchase them here: [Points Page]
  • Win points by participating in contests that offer point prizes
  • Participate in the llama trade (see Question #2 above, "What are llama badges?")
  • Activate the Donations Widget in your profile (go to your profile page, click on the "Edit Page" button on the top right, and add the Donations widget)
  • Offer art commissions, by enabling the Commissions widget on your profile


4. How do I get my art more visibility? Gallery 


--A. GROUPS
There are many, many works submitted to DA at any given moment, which makes the chances of any one particular work being seen by a random passerby very small. To increase visibility for your work, the best thing to do is to join and submit your art to Groups. When a piece of art is submitted and accepted into a group, all of that group's watchers will see that piece in their inbox!

The more specific a group is to a particular interest (examples: a particular fandom, a theme [common ones: cute art, kemonomimi, animals, nature photography], etc.), the more likely your art will reach people with interests similar to yours, and the more likely you will be to receive comments, favs, and watches.

Some groups accept art automatically, while others require each submission to go through a voting process by their moderators. Be sure to read each group's rules before submitting art to that group.

--B. FORUM
You can post thumbnails of your work on the Thumbshare sections of the forum
The thumbnail code is found on the far right side of any deviation page, and looks like this: :thumb#######:



5. How do I draw on DeviantArt? deviantArt Muro Icon ultramini 


Even though DA does have a drawing tool, called Muro, most users make their art either traditionally and scan/photograph it (to learn how to properly photograph your traditional artwork, look here: Basic Tips to Make your Art Look Better), or digitally using their preferred digital painting software, such as Adobe Photoshop/CreativeSuite, Paint Tool Sai, Corel Painter, Gimp, FireAlpaca, MangaStudio, Krita, or even MSPaint.



6. How can I get people to commission me? :allmymoney: 


Activating the Commissions widget does not mean you will get commissioners - like any business, you need to market yourself.

Join Groups and expand your audience (the more watchers you have, the more likely people will commission you). Post your commission info to groups that specialize in advertising and commissions, and in the forum (in "Job Services" if you're asking to get paid in real currency, or in "Projects" if you're asking to get paid in DA points).

When setting your prices, be sure not to underprice your work; that is not fair either for you nor for other artists looking to make a living out of art.



7.What is "watching" and how does it work? Added to my devWatch! 


"Watching" is DeviantArt's term for "following." You can add someone to your Watch list by going to their profile page and clicking the "+watch" button on the top right corner. This button is also found to the bottom right of each deviation (artwork) the person has submitted, right under the image.

By +Watching an artist, you will receive a notification every time they upload new work, journals, and other information.

You can find out how many people you watch and how many watch you by going to your Gallery Stats, accessible from your front page.



8. How do I find and join a Group? deviantART Groups 

  1. First, go to Groups and use the search fields and filters on the left side to find groups to your liking. You can search by theme/interest, art medium, or even geographical region, if you like. :)

  2. Note whether a particular group just has their name listed like normal on that page, or if the group's name is followed by an orange banner that says "super" and has a little house icon deviantART Groups ; this is important for finding the Join button later on.

  3. For a group that sounds interesting to you, go to the group's page, and read through their rules, which are usually posted right on their front page. Otherwise, there will usually be a link to them in their front page.

  4. Locate the Join button. Where this Join button is depends on whether the group is a Super Group (those with the orange banner in the groups listing page) or not. If it's not a Super Group, the Join button is at the top. If it is a Super Group, the group's front page will usually have an extra column on the left side... scroll down and you'll find the Join button in that column.

    Click the Join button (join as a Member) and, if the rules require you to provide any information in the text box, do so; otherwise, just send it in.

  5. You will automatically receive a notification in your message center indicating your application for membership in that group. Some groups accept join requests automatically. Others require each application to go through a review process. If the application is not approved automatically, leave the notification in your message center and check back later to see if it's been approved.




MINI-GLOSSARY

Some terms that you're likely to see around DA and may sound confusing at first:
  • Adoptable(s) - a character/character design that an artist is selling
  • DD - short for "Daily Deviation," a feature of a work, selected by the gallery moderators (known as "community volunteers" and denoted by a ♥ after their username). DDs can be found here: DDs Page
  • Kiriban - a prize offered by some members to someone who catches and screencaps when their visitor counter reaches a certain, specified number
  • Tools of the Trade - whatever you use to create art
  • YCH - short for "your character here," when an artist offers to draw someone else's character in the drawn pose/template

CLOSING REMARKS

DeviantArt also has a very comprehensive "Help & FAQ" section, which is found on the dark grey taskbar at the very bottom of any page on DA, and, also, here: help






ART ADVICE AND OTHER ARTICLES:

Other recommendations for new members:
Basic Tips to Make your Art Look Better
This month's article is a two-parter; one with basic presentation tips for different media, and one with more advanced suggestions for photographing traditional art. For the more advanced article, see here: Tips for Photographing Traditional Artwork
This part s super basic and requires no skill whatsoever, but for people who do this, it REALLY helps your art look better, when displaying online, and minimizes rejections from Groups.
I. ALL MEDIA - MAKE YOUR OWN WATERMARK OR SIGNATURE

Identifying your work is important, but the DA watermark (although it is a nice service to have) is not the best way to go about it. Even though it is easy to apply, unless you have a huge following already, you're hurting yourself more than you're protecting yourself by using it. It's very large and in the center, hurting the visibility and appeal of your work. You've spent a lot of time on your drawing or phot
Useful LinksFREE SOFTWARE THAT I USE:
Pink Flower Irfanview -  Image viewer and simple editor (resize, convert, color hex codes, transform colors) - www.irfanview.com
Pink Flower Gimp - Digital painting and full image editing software; can use brushes made for Photoshop - www.gimp.org


General Art Advice Articles:
Don't Let Anyone Make you Feel Bad About your Art
INSPIRATIONAL ART ADVICE JOURNALS - ISSUE #1
DON'T LET ANYONE MAKE YOU FEEL BAD ABOUT YOUR ART + ASSUMPTIONS AND DIFFERENT ARTISTIC VISIONS

I see so many people with destructive rather than constructive comments on people's art or even general styles of art. In my [previous journal entry], I mentioned how, if you're doing art for your own enjoyment, the only person your art has to please is yourself, and I mentioned about people having different artistic visions.  Since my return to DA, I have seen many people being made to feel insecure about their art. Here's a very old anecdote that I'm using just for illustrative purposes here, and hopefully it will inspire you to not give up...
Back when I was in elementary school, I'd made this little painting for art class (the assignment was to paint whatever we wanted) and was insanely proud of it, thought it was
Art Advice #2 - How to Have a Positive Outlook
When doing art, we know what we want something to look like. When it doesn't turn out the way we want it to, it's easy to fall into the trap of feeling discouraged. But don't!!
:bulletyellow: First, if it gives you some consolation, know the fact that everyone screws up sometimes, even professionals. People just tend to not show their screw-ups, so it's easy to make the false assumption that everything they do is wonderful and they never mess up. Just because you didn't see it doesn't mean it didn't happen. Mistakes and product the artist doesn't like happen to everyone at all levels. It's completely normal!
:bulletyellow: Change your outlook about mistakes. When we draw something that doesn't come out how we intended it, keeping these two things in mind will help you move forward:Every time something doesn't come out "right," we get one step closer to getting to the point where it does come out just the w
Art Advice Issue #3 - Advancing in Art: The 3 Ps
For people who are new at art, or new at a different medium.
Keeping what I call "the three Ps" in mind will help you power through and not quit before you've reached your goal.
I. - PRACTICE
It sounds cliché, but practicing is necessary; not just for art, but for everything. Much like athletes spend years in the youth levels, learning the skills, before they can become professionals... and then even when they're pros, they go to training every day, to hone their skills. Just like they do, so, too, must an artist practice.
Footballer fella (Sports) Da Vinci Fella (Artists)  
Practice can be anything. It doesn't mean you must shade so many spheres before you can-- no! You can shake it up! You practice and hone your skills with every drawing you make. You can practice drawing your OCs, your pet, your favorite piece of decoration in your house. Practice with s
Tips for Photographing Traditional Artwork
A more advanced expansion on my "Basic Tips" article, Basic Tips to Make your Art Look Better. First, let us recap on those basics:
TIPS FOR PHOTOGRAPHING ARTWORK:
Make sure your picture is laid out flat, either lying flat on your desk or attached to a wall. Minimize wrinkles. Set your camera perpendicular (at a 90-degree angle) to your picture. You can use the paper or the canvas' edges as guides against your camera's display to align the picture properly.Unless you have a DSLR with an adjustable flash and are well versed in flash photography, do not use a flash.Take the photo in a well-lit area.
This probably doesn't work if you use a phone camera, but if you use a regular camera and your hands aren't steady enough, set your camera on a pile of book (or use a tripod if you have one) to keep it steady, and use the timer to take the phot
Art Advice Issue #5 - How to Find your Own Style
By far the most common concern I see people on DA mention is, "I wish I had my own style / How can I get my own style?" Hardly a week goes by when I don't see different people saying this. Because of this, I decided to write this article with some tips people may find useful, when searching for a style to call their own. This is what I did, ten years ago, when I was trying to find my own manga style; and I've mentioned this method to some other people and they found it informative and useful as well, so I'm sharing it with you all.
The first part of this article will talk about what is included in what we call "style" (did you know personal style is also found in realism?) and the reasons behind common stylizations (as commonly seen in anime and manga).
The second part talks about how an artist arrives at his or her style, and describes a method you can use if you don't want to wait for your style to surface organically ... in other words, if you wa
Art Advice Issue #6 - Dealing with Art Block
There's something really important to keep in mind: "Art Block" is a mental state, and, as such, it is temporary and you can overcome it!

The term "art block" is misleading, because it makes you think it has one definition, when, in fact, it is a term used to refer to several quite different situations. Here, we'll talk about the different types of art block and how to overcome them.
Star!  TYPE 1 - I WANT TO DRAW, BUT I DON'T KNOW WHAT!
This is the easiest type of art block to deal with. DRAW ANYTHING! It doesn't have to be something spectacular; drawing an object on your desk or in your room will do; it will help you break out of this art block. Here are some ideas for you:
Ask your friends or watchers or random people for suggestions. You don't have to draw all of them; just take the ones that seem appealing to you.Draw random objects: dec
Art Advice #7: How to Ask for + Provide Critique
Critique - if asked for and provided correctly - can be beneficial and doesn't have to hurt. Here, we'll talk about some things to keep in mind when asking for as well as when providing critique.
I.    For both the artist and the critiquer - Opening notes
II.   For the artist requesting critique / improvement help
III.  For the person providing critique
IV.   Closing remarks
I. FOR THE ARTIST AND THE CRITIQUER - OPENING NOTES
DeviantArt is a great platform for interacting with other artists and growing your skills, as well as helping others do the same. Critiques may be exchanged in many ways: in a forum or journal post, in the normal deviation comments, via private Note, or even via chat. Be aware that if you don't have a Core Membership, you can still ask for critique - just say so in your deviation description or make a post about it! :)
It's important, however, to rememb
Art Advice Issue #8 - Random Traditional Art Tips
GENERAL
:new: * If you draw or paint on a table, keep a paper tissue under your drawing hand to keep the oils in your skin from transferring to the paper (this happens even if you've just washed your hands), which may keep the pigments from being properly absorbed in some places.
DRAWING
* To check for errors in your sketch, especially those relating to symmetry, rotate your canvas and place it on each of its sides, step away and look at it. Also, take a photo or scan it, and do a horizontal flip on the image with your computer.
* To easily transfer your sketch onto watercolor paper, board, wood, or other surface, color the back side of your sketch (scan and print it onto regular printer paper if it's in your sketchbook) with a graphite pencil (2B works fine, HB is harder to transfer), tape it graphite-side-down to your watercolor paper, and go over the lines with a pen or sharp pencil. This works like carbon paper


You can find other useful tips and advice journals here: barananduen.deviantart.com/gal…

Favorite Pears, Cute Edition!

Journal Entry: Sat Apr 1, 2017, 6:32 PM
Biting Salamanca Lonely Pear House by SlichoArt
Cute pear by Mi-TokkiThis Pear Doesn't Bite by PeachyProtist
Space Pear by Agaave
trash by ForgottenHope547
Pear's Lake by Stella-Drawspear-junior of salamanca by schl4fmuetze
Biting Pear for badge!! by Delomia
In love with the Shape of You by Domisea
pearcrab by FoxilumiPear Pressure by Yurei-PonLiquid Pear by Gabbi
Cute Pear by 7goodangela friend by L-JamesLolwut by Prince-Lionel
Pretty Much A Selfie by LittleblackraencloudPear Bear by Ry-SpiritThe Biting Pear of Salamanca but as a cat by NotDamien
That Pear by Gryndra
Peary by PhragglePrePEAR yourself for more terrible art by Cakehoarder
Cute Pear! :D by asheens
Peeeaaaar by Karryhime   
Pear by studio-channKawaiii Pear by KawaiiRebichanBiting (cute) Pears ! by Azagwen
The Biting Pear of Salamanca by Spook--Housea pear by Danniful238 - Pearycat by salvadorkatz
p e a r by SnowTehKat
Pear by M-ar  The Kawaii Pear of Salamanca (F2U) by shiicolate  My Pera by StePandy:pearla: 

And here's the Original Biting Pear of Salamanca; the one that started it all:
The Biting Pear of Salamanca by ursulav


:bademoticon: Index of Past Feature Journals :bademoticon: 


Lovely Watchers Series: pt. 6 | pt. 5 | pt. 4 | pt. 3 | pt. 2 | pt. 1
Colors Series: Black & White | Black | Feeling Fresh | Brown | Beige, Gold, Honey Hues | Green | Pink | Purple | Yellow, Orange, Red | Blue | White
Other Features: Food & Drink | Christmas | Art of Succulents | Artful Sketches | Tools of the Trade | Foxes | Cute Stuff | The Sea | Fanart: Sephiroth | Photography: Still Life | Subject: Male | Subject: Animals | Photography: Flowers & Plants | Theme: Cute Halloween

Next feature: April 12th

Tagged: Improvement

Journal Entry: Sun Mar 26, 2017, 12:14 AM
header01 by barananduen

I was tagged by :iconsand-gale: Sand-Gale Hers is way neater, though, so check it out: Tagged
Rules

• Show a few (at least five) of your oldest pieces of artwork.
• Show a few (at least five) of your newest which you personally like the most!
• Tag at least three people

Ayayay this is going to be messier than I'd like. ^^; Well, here goes. I kind of did it differently from what the rules said, though, to make it tell a story.

I. ART


A - DRAWING

First, in 2004, I was trying to learn manga style. These were the first ones I made:
Practicing Manga Style 02 by barananduenHeeere doggeh doggeh XD by barananduen

Then, shortly after that, I wanted my own manga style. To do this, I tried drawing one same character in different ways, like I described here: Art Advice Issue #5 - How to Find your Own Style Here's one of the ones I did, while going through this process:
Irvine work in process by barananduen
That was one I actually liked, so I uploaded it.

This experimentation process took a while. Then, in 2005, I developed a style with which I was satisfied, which you can see in the "2005" sketch below.
In 2008, I stopped drawing, and took it back up again in 2013. I was still interested in manga style, but I wanted something leaning more toward realism in the semi-realistic spectrum.

Here, you can compare the same two drawings, of the same character, in 2005 and 2015, in sketch only, and then in color:
Irvine 2005 vs 2015 by barananduen         pixel: Irvine redesigned by barananduenIrvine Kinneas - Memories of FF8 by barananduen

I also did some of these comparisons/"draw this agains" with some of my OCs:
Helios comparison 2007-2014b by barananduen
Ceb comparison by barananduen
Fire04 - sketch improvement comparison by barananduen




B - DIGITAL PAINTING

Let me tell you, even though I could do pixel art, I was useless at bigger stuff and thought I would never be able to do digital painting! :faint: I hope this inspires someone to not give up, like I almost did!

Here is probably my first (or the only remaining one I have saved) digital painting, from 2005 (Open Canvas and mouse), followed by the first one I made with a tablet and Gimp, in 2007:
King Nut for nekokat by barananduenCerebrus   Dj At The Rave By Barananduen by barananduen

And some of my recent (2015-2016) digital paintings, also with Gimp and using the same, 10-year-old tablet:
Rafaga - Wind Elemental by barananduenHurrak by barananduenFyrron - Fire Elemental by barananduen


II. PHOTOGRAPHY


This changed a lot for me, and is easier to compare in a neater fashion.

2008 - 2010:
Flowers by barananduenFlower-02 by barananduenFlower-01 by barananduenSimple Tranquility By Barananduen-dncpp4 by barananduen

New:
Surprises Hidden Along the Way by barananduenLight Shining Through by barananduen. Delicate Romantic . by barananduenFiligree Heart by barananduenBalade Sucre'e by barananduen
And it's not just gear-related. The first "new" one, with the clover, was taken with the same camera as the old ones above, a 5MP point-and-click compact. The difference is also due to learning about the different setting-variables in taking a photo (aperture, shutter speed, ISO) and how they give you different looks, as well as learning more general things like composition, angle, color, and lighting.






I tag... anyone who wants to do something like this. XP

Feature: Theme: Black and White

Journal Entry: Wed Mar 22, 2017, 1:00 PM
Black by FixMeKnow
my own little galaxy by jeanbeanxoxo
Black And White by PhoenixstamatisAuf Und Ab by scheinbar
Puzzling Notes - Photo A Day Challenge - Day #12 by NikkiNightOwl
black..white by XxHayleyXx3DGM - White Black by Miyukiko
Dedal by SashaKosmos313 by ElyneNoir
Fiend Magazine: Fashion Pge. 6 by BeccyBex
Right Here Waiting by Zetahadrian
Levi and Mikasa wedding by OlggahWhite shade of Black by Nachan
Black and White World. by KyraTeppelin
Glowing by rainylakeSilent Hill by LidiaRossana
Romance 4 by anotherwannabeartist
Black and White Cala or Calla by TruemarkPhotographyPolish Dan - Tattoo Artist by Click-Click-UK
Forever by JacquelineBarkla
Light matter, dark matter by KARRR- No Title 48 - by KARRR
The Climb by paikan07
Black by neo-innovLast Light by EveningofLight
Wat Rong Khun by DrewHopper
Weiss.Schwarz by innevataBlack And White by IMustBeDead
Winter dreams by virnagray
Kitty vortex by photosopherBlack and White by IngridTan
Black and white by VikarusChubby Bunny by kittynn


:Black-orb: by kayosa-stock Index of Past Feature Journals  :Silver-orb: by kayosa-stock


Lovely Watchers Series: pt. 6 | pt. 5 | pt. 4 | pt. 3 | pt. 2 | pt. 1
Colors Series: Black | Feeling Fresh | Brown | Beige, Gold, Honey Hues | Green | Pink | Purple | Yellow, Orange, Red | Blue | White
Other Features: Food & Drink | Christmas | Art of Succulents | Artful Sketches | Tools of the Trade | Foxes | Cute Stuff | The Sea | Fanart: Sephiroth | Photography: Still Life | Subject: Male | Subject: Animals | Photography: Flowers & Plants | Theme: Cute Halloween

Next feature: April 12th

Feature: A Feast! Food and Drink

Journal Entry: Sat Feb 25, 2017, 1:13 PM


:skyblue-orb: by kayosa-stock  Index of Past Feature Journals   :skyblue-orb: by kayosa-stock


Lovely Watchers Series: pt. 6 | pt. 5 | pt. 4 | pt. 3 | pt. 2 | pt. 1
Colors Series: Black | Feeling Fresh | Brown | Beige, Gold, Honey Hues | Green | Pink | Purple | Yellow, Orange, Red | Blue | White
Other Features: Christmas | Art of Succulents | Artful Sketches | Tools of the Trade | Foxes | Cute Stuff | The Sea | Fanart: Sephiroth | Photography: Still Life | Subject: Male | Subject: Animals | Photography: Flowers & Plants | Theme: Cute Halloween

Next feature: March 22nd