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Other Worldly

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We got new regular customers since last month.
Every friday night, the sound of bones rattling gets into the rhythm of jazz.
They usually talk about their job, but there's something special that keeps me awake, listening to their conversation.

One customer is the most desired worker from everywhere, though being poorly treated in workplace.
The one with foreign accent drinks nothing but tequilla. The day he orders Blue Margarita is his lucky day.
The other, whose face is too prodigal compared to his age I can judge in his way of speaking, seems to be out of work recently. But he always laugh and toast cheerily.

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A.Shipwright

Artstation www.artstation.com/a_shipwrigh…
Twitter twitter.com/shipwrighta
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Image details
Image size
4732x3198px 5.84 MB
Make
samsung
Model
SM-A505N
Shutter Speed
1/3700 second
Aperture
F/1.7
Focal Length
4 mm
ISO Speed
40
Date Taken
Jul 15, 2020, 1:05:57 PM
Published:
© 2020 - 2021 ashpwright
Comments31
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ajajajnomanches's avatar
Susumu-Kito-Kunow97's avatar
BlackVulmea's avatar

'Jeez, what's a guy gotta do around here to rest his weary bones in peace?'

Touch-Not-This-Cat's avatar
A DEFENCE OF SKELETONS


Some little time ago I stood among immemorial English trees that seemed to take hold upon the stars like a brood of Ygdrasils. As I walked among these living pillars I became gradually aware that the rustics who lived and died in their shadow adopted a very curious conversational tone. They seemed to be constantly apologizing for the trees, as if they were a very poor show. After elaborate investigation, I discovered that their gloomy and penitent tone was traceable to the fact that it was winter and all the trees were bare. I assured them that I did not resent the fact that it was winter, that I knew the thing had happened before, and that no forethought on their part could have averted this blow of destiny. But I could not in any way reconcile them to the fact that it was winter. There was evidently a general feeling that I had caught the trees in a kind of disgraceful deshabille, and that they ought not to be seen until, like the first human sinners, they had covered themselves with leaves. So it is quite clear that, while very few people appear to know anything of how trees look in winter, the actual foresters know less than anyone. So far from the line of the tree when it is bare appearing harsh and severe, it is luxuriantly indefinable to an unusual degree; the fringe of the forest melts away like a vignette. The tops of two or three high trees when they are leafless are so soft that they seem like the gigantic brooms of that fabulous lady who was sweeping the cobwebs off the sky. The outline of a leafy forest is in comparison hard, gross and blotchy; the clouds of night do not more certainly obscure the moon than those green and monstrous clouds obscure the tree; the actual sight of the little wood, with its gray and silver sea of life, is entirely a winter vision. So dim and delicate is the heart of the winter woods, a kind of glittering gloaming, that a figure stepping towards us in the chequered twilight seems as if he were breaking through unfathomable depths of spiders' webs.

But surely the idea that its leaves are the chief grace of a tree is a vulgar one, on a par with the idea that his hair is the chief grace of a pianist. When winter, that healthy ascetic, carries his gigantic razor over hill and valley, and shaves all the trees like monks, we feel surely that they are all the more like trees if they are shorn, just as so many painters and musicians would be all the more like men if they were less like mops. But it does appear to be a deep and essential difficulty that men have an abiding terror of their own structure, or of the structure of things they love. This is felt dimly in the skeleton of the tree: it is felt profoundly in the skeleton of the man.

The importance of the human skeleton is very great, and the horror with which it is commonly regarded is somewhat mysterious. Without claiming for the human skeleton a wholly conventional beauty, we may assert that he is certainly not uglier than a bull-dog, whose popularity never wanes, and that he has a vastly more cheerful and ingratiating expression. But just as man is mysteriously ashamed of the skeletons of the trees in winter, so he is mysteriously ashamed of the skeleton of himself in death. It is a singular thing altogether, this horror of the architecture of things. One would think it would be most unwise in a man to be afraid of a skeleton, since Nature has set curious and quite insuperable obstacles to his running away from it.

One ground exists for this terror: a strange idea has infected humanity that the skeleton is typical of death. A man might as well say that a factory chimney was typical of bankruptcy. The factory may be left naked after ruin, the skeleton may be left naked after bodily dissolution; but both of them have had a lively and workmanlike life of their own, all the pulleys creaking, all the wheels turning, in the House of Livelihood as in the House of Life. There is no reason why this creature (new, as I fancy, to art), the living skeleton, should not become the essential symbol of life.

The truth is that man's horror of the skeleton is not horror of death at all. It is man's eccentric glory that he has not, generally speaking, any objection to being dead, but has a very serious objection to being undignified. And the fundamental matter which troubles him in the skeleton is the reminder that the ground-plan of his appearance is shamelessly grotesque. I do not know why he should object to this. He contentedly takes his place in a world that does not pretend to be genteel—a laughing, working, jeering world. He sees millions of animals carrying, with quite a dandified levity, the most monstrous shapes and appendages, the most preposterous horns, wings, and legs, when they are necessary to utility. He sees the good temper of the frog, the unaccountable happiness of the hippopotamus. He sees a whole universe which is ridiculous, from the animalcule, with a head too big for its body, up to the comet, with a tail too big for its head. But when it comes to the delightful oddity of his own inside, his sense of humour rather abruptly deserts him.

In the Middle Ages and in the Renaissance (which was, in certain times and respects, a much gloomier period) this idea of the skeleton had a vast influence in freezing the pride out of all earthly pomps and the fragrance out of all fleeting pleasures. But it was not, surely, the mere dread of death that did this, for these were ages in which men went to meet death singing; it was the idea of the degradation of man in the grinning ugliness of his structure that withered the juvenile insolence of beauty and pride. And in this it almost assuredly did more good than harm. There is nothing so cold or so pitiless as youth, and youth in aristocratic stations and ages tended to an impeccable dignity, an endless summer of success which needed to be very sharply reminded of the scorn of the stars. It was well that such flamboyant prigs should be convinced that one practical joke, at least, would bowl them over, that they would fall into one grinning man-trap, and not rise again. That the whole structure of their existence was as wholesomely ridiculous as that of a pig or a parrot they could not be expected to realize; that birth was humorous, coming of age humorous, drinking and fighting humorous, they were far too young and solemn to know. But at least they were taught that death was humorous.

There is a peculiar idea abroad that the value and fascination of what we call Nature lie in her beauty. But the fact that Nature is beautiful in the sense that a dado or a Liberty curtain is beautiful, is only one of her charms, and almost an accidental one. The highest and most valuable quality in Nature is not her beauty, but her generous and defiant ugliness. A hundred instances might be taken. The croaking noise of the rooks is, in itself, as hideous as the whole hell of sounds in a London railway tunnel. Yet it uplifts us like a trumpet with its coarse kindliness and honesty, and the lover in 'Maud' could actually persuade himself that this abominable noise resembled his lady-love's name. Has the poet, for whom Nature means only roses and lilies, ever heard a pig grunting? It is a noise that does a man good—a strong, snorting, imprisoned noise, breaking its way out of unfathomable dungeons through every possible outlet and organ. It might be the voice of the earth itself, snoring in its mighty sleep. This is the deepest, the oldest, the most wholesome and religious sense of the value of Nature—the value which comes from her immense babyishness. She is as top-heavy, as grotesque, as solemn and as happy as a child. The mood does come when we see all her shapes like shapes that a baby scrawls upon a slate—simple, rudimentary, a million years older and stronger than the whole disease that is called Art. The objects of earth and heaven seem to combine into a nursery tale, and our relation to things seems for a moment so simple that a dancing lunatic would be needed to do justice to its lucidity and levity. The tree above my head is flapping like some gigantic bird standing on one leg; the moon is like the eye of a Cyclops. And, however much my face clouds with sombre vanity, or vulgar vengeance, or contemptible contempt, the bones of my skull beneath it are laughing for ever.
K-E-Y-K-O's avatar

Or....Papyrus, Gaster and Sans. :)

JLIXIRIUM's avatar

This is so charming!

Welcometomymine's avatar

Golly gosh you always have such interesting and cool ideas

cybermeff's avatar

Cool. Cool cool cool.

JJFASST's avatar

𝕽𝖊𝖒𝖊𝖒𝖇𝖊𝖗 𝖒𝖞 𝖓𝖆𝖒𝖊

Monseo's avatar
JAFNOVA's avatar

Cool!:)

Reminds me of a few "Dive Bars" I've been to in my travels.


"Name your poison stranger."

Evodolka's avatar

awesome work here :D

UDtheAesir's avatar
Shawass's avatar
DrUSB1's avatar

In death we are all equal.

otacan's avatar
I dont know why this makes me smile so hard
CMVreud's avatar

El Hueso Sombrero : Dude, he has a skelleton bird under his cranium.

Teach R. Bones : Dude, perhaps you should lay off that stuff for a while.

Crazy Bones : El Margarita~ El Margarita~ dos Chimichangas por favor~

El Margerita~ El Margarita~ dos Chimichangas por favor~

Birdy Bones : Oigan con gusto estos versos

escuchen con atención,

ya la pobre pasérido

no consigue ni un tostón

El Hueaso Sombrero : Yeah, perhaps I should.

gif
Persian7's avatar

Awesome style mesh !

Libra1010's avatar

SOMBRERO: "They always doing that?"


MIDDLE: "Are they always doing what?"

Libra1010's avatar

"EH, I'm feeling a little cuckoo - you wanna feel a little cuckoo?"


CUCKOO: "Well here he is!"

ikazon's avatar

As long as they're ribbing one another, it's all good :D Nice work as always!

PawlyTigris's avatar

Now i want to play Grim Fandango again! :)

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