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Elasmosaurus sp. by Ashere Elasmosaurus sp. by Ashere
Everyone loves Elasmosaurus. Because, I mean, seriously. Look at it. Long neck. Teeth. Like a snake threaded through a turtle. I chose to give it coloration similar to a Leatherback Sea Turtle, which is the largest oceangoing reptile and has a certain dignified something to it. Again, this fellow isn't known from Alabama, but almost certainly came through at one point or another.
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:icondinobatfan:
dinobatfan Featured By Owner Feb 9, 2013  Professional General Artist
Wow! This is excellent! :D Grand artistry here! :D
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:iconashere:
Ashere Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you very much! I'm glad you like it.
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:icondinobatfan:
dinobatfan Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2013  Professional General Artist
You're quite welcome. :)
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:iconjwartwork:
JWArtwork Featured By Owner Nov 13, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Great pose! :nod:
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:iconjulius2611:
julius2611 Featured By Owner Oct 25, 2012  Professional General Artist
awesome representation of this species!!!!! this is one of my favorites marine reptiles, and i love the way u draw it!!!
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:icongeekspace:
geekspace Featured By Owner Oct 24, 2012
Loving the elegant, solid curve of that neck. Given that these critters don't exactly look built for speed or self-defense, I have to wonder how they kept off the mosasaurs' menu (well, often enough to perpetuate, anyhow). Kelp beds? Regions too shallow for Tylosaurus & its ilk to easily maneuver? Bit of a head-scratcher, that.
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:iconashere:
Ashere Featured By Owner Oct 24, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I've wondered that myself. I think when they got to be fully grown they were just too damn big for anything but a Tylosaur to really deal with effectively. Maybe they schooled in addition to kelp beds and shallow waters? The image of an elasmosaur hanging suspended in a kelp forest is a pretty evocative one; it might be worth illustrating.

Also, it's worth keeping in mind that while a marine predator can often tackle something larger then it is, they generally don't. It's less trouble.
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:icongeekspace:
geekspace Featured By Owner Oct 24, 2012
Conservation of energy for two or three-bite prey seems like a valid reason for the middle/bantamweight hunters to bother something else. Didn't even think of schooling, so good call there. I could easily imagine earlier/smaller plesiosaurs & elasmosaur young making use of kelp cover as well.
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October 16, 2012
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