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Building and train at Vauxhall by ash Building and train at Vauxhall by ash
Another one of my favourite london buildings. It has a name, but I've forgotten what it is. The murky diffuse light and overcast sky are typical London weather. It's enough to make grown men cry into their beards.

Vauxhall, London, Sept 2002
Fuji Neopan 400, lab, scanned neg, toned in photoshop
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:iconnarang99:
narang99 Featured By Owner Sep 19, 2002
ha ha ha, Lonodn weather sucks so much! it dose make a grown man cry...
I think this is a fecking good photo, the bulding isnt tilting from distoration, the colour tone fits the image, the expoure is perfect, and way it is composed the whole thing is fantastic, even though it's of a bulding, it's looks very good, top stuff.
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:iconash:
ash Featured By Owner Sep 18, 2002
yes you're right: your people and my buildings are both the same kind of thing -- that hadn't occured to me. particularly the parts about "faceless uncompromising modernism, which is entirely conventional in today's thinking", etc, can easily be reinterpreted as statements about the ideas about beauty that are portrayed in the media.

I guess even the most uncreative architecture in the world is notable for that, if nothing else :) (Smile) I like the idea of painting a picture of the deep nature of something, even if that nature is sometimes an apparently mundane or unattractive one.

I did give your freeway shots some thought as I wrote the above diatribe. they're quite similar in that (I expect) they're pictures taken not only to show the beauty of something, but in the knowledge that that beauty is not something that's immediately apparent.
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:iconearther:
earther Featured By Owner Sep 18, 2002
I have seen the light, brother!
Honestly.
Thanks so much for your insightful and elegant explaination Ash. Within the first sentence, i recognized exactly what you were getting at. The analogy that was all too appearant is that you see in these buildings which you love so much, exactly what i see in the people i photograph. That immediately led me to a revelation of sorts concerning my too narrow perception of american architecture. One thing i've always boohoo'd about was that in Italy, where Verunec lives ;) (Wink) , it's understandable that he would enjoy taking photographs of the incredible architecture present there. Whereas here, i'm stuck with looking at the some of the most uncreative architecture in the world. Nearly all of it built in a time where necessity ruled the minds and creativity was seen as a luxury....
Crap, i gotta run out the door. Im off to art direct a photoshoot of a candy cane that will eventually become a city bus! LOL I swear!

Promise i will finish this a bit later....

I'm curious to hear how you link your thoughts on my freeway concrete with those above tho...

And also, know you anything about openGL?
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:iconash:
ash Featured By Owner Sep 18, 2002
These buildings (the ones that I like) are often considered "ugly", or at best mundane, by other people. What I'm trying to do is show their beauty. The problem is that it's a subtle and unconventional kind of beauty (imho) that has more to do with their context and, ironically, their run-down state than with the sorts of beauty that people normally associate with architecture.

To me, these buildings are much more characterful and interesting than the sort of modern gleaming glass-and-metal towers that people often photograph. The main feature of those glass-and-metal towers is often their faceless uncompromising modernism, which is entirely conventional in today's thinking. In contrast buildings like this one represent what now seems a curious folly, a period of design that made sense at the time but has come and gone. In that way, like museum pieces, they reflect a way of thinking that has gone out of fashion. Also by virtue of their age and grimy state they have a character that is more than just their form; they've come to reflect their environment.

When the glass-and-metal towers are old and cracked and grey they too will have an interesting character, and will represent a way of thinking that is curious for being long gone, but for now they're exactly what their designers intended, and nothing more, and in that way they show, to me, the same contrived characterless perfection that one associates with TV adverts and brochures. Styles are more interesting when seen from the perspective provided by distance.

Lastly, this building has a fucked-up overly industrial and hard-edged design that is genuinely interesting, I think. I probably haven't really succeeded in putting that across in this image (I wasn't trying too hard) but will take up the challenge and try to show it some other shots soon.
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:iconverunec:
verunec Featured By Owner Sep 17, 2002
That's a beautiful building. Well, very photogenic at least. And the lamp, the semaphore! Everything is perfect here, everything contribute to create a wonderful urban scenery. Think about how much poetry you can find between a couple of buildings and others urban equipment. And the light do its best part, sometimes. Pictures like this one really can touch my sensibility.
Dear Earther, this is what I have to say: +fav. But it was to be expected, not a great surprise hehe ;) (Wink)
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:iconearther:
earther Featured By Owner Sep 17, 2002
Uhhhh, yea, some pretty 'amazing' architecture there :? (Confused)
I wonder what Verunec would have to say...
Cant help but liking this one for some reason tho.
The only thing i could suggest is binging up the tone on the train.
Did you know if you use a darkly colored brush set to overlay or multiply on your high pass layer and control the opacity of the brush using the 1-0 keys, that it's a quite effective burn tool? And if you use a white brush with 'screen' and varying opacity, it makes for a damn fine dodger. Another way to do this without using the high pass layer is to create a new layer with overlay neutral color to fill and then use the brushes in the way described above. THis allows you to have all your d&b on one layer and to be able to control it most accurately.
Did that make any sense at all?
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:iconmcismowski:
mcismowski Featured By Owner Sep 16, 2002
this photo reminds me of my computer's motherboard.
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:iconcorporatewhore:
corporatewhore Featured By Owner Sep 16, 2002
overcast days are so perfect but of course i myself perfer nice crisp clean cool weather, the days of autumn. i love teh composition... perfect contrast, between the earth and sky. the curving tracks work so well with the textures and lead your eye towards the train... this also reminds me of the the evolution of technology.
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:iconislandtalker:
islandtalker Featured By Owner Sep 16, 2002
Pretty cool photo.
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September 16, 2002
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