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T. rex should be 

58%
3,187 deviants said Somewhere in between
27%
1,497 deviants said Feathered
15%
835 deviants said Naked

Devious Comments

:iconthalia-dawnbringer:
Thalia-Dawnbringer Featured By Owner 3 days ago  Hobbyist Writer
I'd say somewhere down the middle - not completely featherless, but not covered with feathers/down to the point that it looks like a giant chicken.  I know Jurassic Park III gets a lot of heck, but the quills on the raptors in that film might be a basis for  what early feathers on dinosaurs looked like and where they might've been placed.
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:iconicypheonix:
IcyPheonix Featured By Owner 6 days ago  Student General Artist
I find it funny that people think that feathers would make it 'not scary', as if we don't have modern day birds smaller than I am that aren't nightmares-geese(I can vouch for this one), swans, turkeys(wild ones especially), birds of prey being territorial, cassowarys, ostrich... Even chickens are apparently terrifying given the number of videos I've seen of people running in fear just cause one chased them.
But a T-rex (or any large dinosaur) with feathers is suddenly, NOT scary? I call shenanigans.
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:iconlythroversor:
Lythroversor Featured By Owner Nov 6, 2018
We have a 9m yutyrannus covered with feather
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:iconkatepfeilschiefter:
KatePfeilschiefter Featured By Owner Oct 2, 2018  Professional Digital Artist
I like the idea of a little of both design-wise and based on the general gist I've picked up on following Suarian and bits of dino news. Mostly "naked" with some feathers on the back of the head/neck flowing down the nape of the neck and onto the back like a shawl or cape. Maybe a little coming down onto the outer facing portion of the forelimbs, but featherless underneath like an ostrich. 

Also wattles, I demand ludicrous chicken wattles. I'm skeptical of the likelihood of such a feature, feels like it'd be a liability in a fight, but it's fun to imagine.   
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:iconarvalis:
arvalis Featured By Owner Oct 4, 2018  Professional Digital Artist
My issue with wattles and other such display structures on large theropods is two fold. First, such structures are rarely seen in extant predatory animals as they call unnecessary attention to an animal that often needs to be unseen to get a meal. Second the amount of weight of the skin that would be hanging off of the head and neck would be a lot. Seems like that would be quite the disadvantage. That all being said I think those structures on herbivores and much smaller theropods are totally cool. 👍
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:iconkatepfeilschiefter:
KatePfeilschiefter Featured By Owner Edited Oct 6, 2018  Professional Digital Artist
That makes sense, and perhaps would be why when I do imagine such structures on large theropods they seem so comical. Thanks.

I'll also have to revise my statement after reading the new Saurian blog post, I didn't realize one of the scale impressions was from the back of the neck which would certainly -as those on Saurian and the paleontologists already concluded- exclude that place as the last likely bastion for large feather coverage. The alternative, imagining bits and patches of feathers conveniently skirting the scale patches would certainly be unusual and unlikely. 
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:iconarvalis:
arvalis Featured By Owner Oct 6, 2018  Professional Digital Artist
Yeah every time I see a tiny feather cape on the back of a rex now it feels like clinging to an outdated idea. Like when people were drawing feathered raptors that still had Jurassic Park scaly raptor heads haha
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:iconneilfinnstudios:
NeilFinnStudios Featured By Owner Sep 28, 2018  Student Digital Artist
I love both scaley and feathered rexes, but I personally would like to believe it would have "somewhat" of a feather coat. From your most recent design, it has scales, and while I think your design looks awesome I still prefer the now outdated version due to the originality. 
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:iconthemorlock:
TheMorlock Featured By Owner Sep 27, 2018  Student General Artist
Scantily clad tyrannosaurs all the way, baby!
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:iconmark0731:
mark0731 Featured By Owner Sep 27, 2018
Scaly, or scaly with a feather amount less or comparable to the amount of hair on elephants. I'm totally defending your new T. rex model for Saurian. Scaly T. rex=/=JP/JW T. rex, Feathernazis!
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:iconharpesian:
Harpesian Featured By Owner Sep 27, 2018  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I heard T. rexes are supposed to have a line of black feathers down their spines.
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:iconarvalis:
arvalis Featured By Owner Sep 27, 2018  Professional Digital Artist
That’s a weird thing
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:iconharpesian:
Harpesian Featured By Owner Oct 5, 2018  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
That's what I heard it was though!!! Ionno, if you wanna be really accurate though, maybe some research investigation could prove useful.
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:iconarvalis:
arvalis Featured By Owner Oct 5, 2018  Professional Digital Artist
I already know the answer, this poll was to see what other folks were leaning towards. Currently the science says that no feathers is the most parsimonious conclusion.
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:iconharpesian:
Harpesian Featured By Owner Oct 28, 2018  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Oh! Strange! That's not what I'd heard! I'd heard about the spine line thing. I might need to investigate further myself just to make sure.
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:iconcomixqueen:
comixqueen Featured By Owner Sep 25, 2018  Professional Digital Artist
Whatever science says it was, regardless of my personal preference.
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:iconpro-mole:
pro-mole Featured By Owner Sep 25, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
I think it's about time we accept the fact that a gigantic, fanged, clawed beast is scary even if it's all covered in feathers.

Honestly, I don't even thing having feathers makes a creature less threatening. It just has no influence on threat level, but it does look cooler :V
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:iconlittlefoot505:
Littlefoot505 Featured By Owner Sep 24, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
I'd say somewhere in between. In other words, not a giant chicken, and not the scaly Rex we all know and love.
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:iconteampokemonspain:
TeamPokemonSpain Featured By Owner Sep 24, 2018
A big chicken
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:icongoku-san:
Goku-san Featured By Owner Sep 23, 2018   Digital Artist
I would say somewhere between.  Mostly scaly but also partially feathered around the dorsum.
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:icon12monkehs:
12monkehs Featured By Owner Sep 22, 2018  Hobbyist Artist
Probably just naked with some scaly regions around the tail, legs, neck and head.
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:iconlordgojira:
LordGojira Featured By Owner Sep 22, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
A bit of both.  turkey-rex XD by nebezial
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:iconmr-placo:
Mr-Placo Featured By Owner Edited Sep 22, 2018  Hobbyist
Sample by Mr-Placo  
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:iconarvalis:
arvalis Featured By Owner Sep 22, 2018  Professional Digital Artist
Looks an awful lot like this  Saurian-Tyrannosaurus rex by arvalis  Too bad thats pretty outdated now. 
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:iconmr-placo:
Mr-Placo Featured By Owner Edited Sep 22, 2018  Hobbyist
Well... Not completely. From the new evidence of scales on the hips, all the Saurian team needs to do is to remove some of the feathers off of that part of the body, and it's not out of the question that the feathers could have existed between the scales but so far we have no direct evidence of that.

Again, just like the pic I posted.
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:iconarvalis:
arvalis Featured By Owner Sep 22, 2018  Professional Digital Artist
You know I am on the Saurian team right? I'm the guy that designs the rex. The paleontologists we consulted said that the amount of feathers on our rex and by extension your diagram are outdated. Naked/scaly is much more likely. 
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:icongoku-san:
Goku-san Featured By Owner Sep 23, 2018   Digital Artist
Just curious. Do these paleontologists have any papers published? I would love to read them sometime if they do. 
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:iconarvalis:
arvalis Featured By Owner Sep 23, 2018  Professional Digital Artist
Scott Hartman and Mark Witton have both published. 
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:icondinohunter000:
DinoHunter000 Featured By Owner Sep 22, 2018  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
"Somewhere in between". Given that they are ancestrally feathered, logically there should be some small, vestigial remnants/evidence left behind. But I agree that they were predominantly scaly. 
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:iconjricht:
jricht Featured By Owner Sep 22, 2018
A T-Rex is a very large animal, and its likely it wouldn't have needed much feathers to keep itself warm unless it was in a cold environment.

See how Elephants are mammals but have very little hair on their bodies due to their size and environment.
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:iconhelixdude:
Helixdude Featured By Owner Sep 22, 2018  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Being a very large animal T-Rex would've only need a full feathery coat if it was living in freezing conditions like its relative Yutyrannus. The majority of the animal in life would be covered in scales with a ridge of quills running along its back. 
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:iconotakusauridae:
OtakuSauridae Featured By Owner Sep 22, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
This isn't for the new Saurian Rex is it?

No offence to the people commenting, but I think a public poll for a game aimed strictly at accuracy (I hope it's still aimed strictly for accuracy) won't do us so well.

Especially since a lot of the time people will just post nostalgic preferences and not actual opinions.
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:iconarvalis:
arvalis Featured By Owner Sep 22, 2018  Professional Digital Artist
No I'm just gauging the general public opinion. The new Saurian rex is finished and its scaly. 
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:iconmisty15arts97:
Misty15ARTS97 Featured By Owner Sep 21, 2018  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I imagine they start out covered in fluffy feathers then lose most of it when it grows into an adult. The rest remains on the head running down its back.
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:iconcovelloraptor:
Covelloraptor Featured By Owner Sep 20, 2018
feathered but in the same manner that elephants are hairy
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:iconkyra-monroe:
Kyra-Monroe Featured By Owner Sep 20, 2018
Scientifically speaking, T. Rex's probably had something like rudimentary feathers or quills based on their ancestors and close relatives. My evolutionary bio professor had this great chart about it but I can't find it in my notes anymore
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:iconwesternwolfwarrior:
WesternWolfWarrior Featured By Owner Sep 20, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I kind of imagine the largest theropods to be mostly scaly but with short hair-like feathers, perhaps between the scales. Not that a bushy-feathered Tyrannosaurus is out of the question, but with the varied (albeit, small) patches of scales found it seems more than likely that T. rex was mostly scaly.
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:iconsavior-of-humanity:
SAVIOR-of-HUMANITY Featured By Owner Sep 20, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Please consider; "naked" t-rex but with a "mane" of feathers.
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:iconkonggodamera:
konggodamera Featured By Owner Sep 20, 2018  Hobbyist Writer
Elephants, hippos, and rhinos are all massive, warm-blooded mammals which live in warm climates. The combination of their endothermy and environment meant that they lost almost all of their hair (well, hippos could've lost hair to be hydrodynamic, but still).
Now, dinosaurs are generally considered to be endothermic, and a t. rex was an animal the size of an elephant, which lived in a subtropical climate; i.e. it was warm and humid. I can't imagine a massive, endothermic animal that lives in a warm climate having a total covering of feathers. Little patches here-and-there, but not heavily feathered at all.
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:iconwesternwolfwarrior:
WesternWolfWarrior Featured By Owner Sep 20, 2018  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Fur and feathers work differently, though. Feathers can actually keep an animal cool in environments where a furry mammal would overheat (see emus vs kangaroos).  
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:iconwindwing101:
WindWing101 Featured By Owner Sep 20, 2018
Given that there's been recent studies saying it may not have had feathers, and Saurian is now going back to the naked look, I'm honestly not sure. My actual default answer isn't a "should it be this or that" but more "it should be whatever it was." Given that we don't know for certain which one it was yet, I feel like I don't really have a place to say. I really liked the idea of a feathered rex, mostly because it challenged the status quo and helped step further away from the idea that all dinosaurs looked like Jurassic Park's movie monsters. But the argument became so personal and heated on both sides, feathers vs no feathers, and I myself also got wrapped up in it, hoping that feathers were proven, a sort of victory for the animal being, well, just a living being.

But at the same time, I'm not gonna then turn around and deny facts if it turns out it wasn't feathered. The rex was whatever it was, and the more we find out about these amazing creatures, the more we'll know. I think I just ultimately am interested in however they looked, or behaved, as someone who loves animals.
But I don't want to try and think about what best looks cool. (Even if the idea of a giant feathered rex was an amazing concept)
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:iconcretaceousisle:
cretaceousisle Featured By Owner Sep 20, 2018  Hobbyist
My rule of thumb has been this: Males often times have display features, something to use to attract females. As such, if the T.rex is supposed to be male, I would give it some sort of mane going down its back and neck, colored something like a red hawk, a color that would look nice while not hindering the animals stalking and hunting abilities by being to noticeable. Something like that. If the T.rex is supposed to be female, females usually are duller colors, little to no displays, etc, so I would give it little to none (it would at least not standout or be very noticeable if she did have it). I feel that fits the fossil evidence while also leaving possibilities to be creative and experiment with different designs and concepts.
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:icon2minds1art:
2minds1art Featured By Owner Sep 20, 2018  Hobbyist General Artist
a mane of protofeathers would be pretty cool
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:icongiovanihydraliskcorp:
give it floooooooooooooooooooof
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:iconhandsomegamerguy:
HandsomeGamerGuy Featured By Owner Sep 20, 2018
Hm. More Scales then Feather.
But it depens on what sort of T-Rex....
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:iconrayodin:
Rayodin Featured By Owner Sep 20, 2018
Any proof they ever had feathers? Or is that just guess work by paleontologists?
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:iconrayodin:
Rayodin Featured By Owner Sep 22, 2018
I just gave you a watch! Thanks for being kool!
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:iconblabyloo229:
Blabyloo229 Featured By Owner Sep 20, 2018
No hard evidence of feathers on T Rex, no. it's incredibly rare for feathers to fossilize, though (you have to have very fine particles, such as volcanic ash) so they could have them and the feathers could just not fossilize. However, many therapod dinosaurs, including members of the tyrannosaur family, have been found with feathers, so it is fairly reasonable to reconstruct T Rex with feathers. It's not quite guesswork, as there is evidence to support a partially feathered Rex. Of course, there is also hard evidence of T Rex having scales on some parts of its body. The most likely reconstruction is part scaly and part feathered, perhaps like an Ostrich. I'm no expert, just a Dino enthusiast.
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:iconrayodin:
Rayodin Featured By Owner Sep 20, 2018
Thank you for the insightful and kind reply! Was hoping for a good and informative response! I got one! Kudos!
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:iconblabyloo229:
Blabyloo229 Featured By Owner Sep 21, 2018
You're welcome. I'd recommend you look up some more knowledgeable sources to get better info than I can give, if you're curious. As I said, I'm no expert, just a massive dino fan who listens to experts :D
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