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WW1  British Equipment by AndreaSilva60 WW1  British Equipment by AndreaSilva60
WWI -  Technical Table

The 1908 pattern web Equipment   was a modern and confortable equipment made of cotton webbing.  During war the shortage of this issue led to the introduction of the 1914 Pattern Leather Equipment, intendend for training and second line troops, but often delivered  to the first line troops too.  When this equipment was assembled it formed a single piece, making it easy to remove and put back.

The SBR gas mask if  was not the best,  certainly was not second to any other, it was used by Italian and American troops too. This  mask was effective with all types of gas used in the First World War, the external filter, joined to the mask by a corrugated tube,   consisted of layers of coal active and gauze soaked in neutralizing substances.

The P14 rifle was a British project, superseded by the SMLE, despite being an excellent weapon, the magazine contained less shots than the SMLE and the bolt had slower action, while the English doctrine developed after the war against the Boers called for  the rapid-fire. Thanks to its ballistic qualities it became the snipers' rifle.

The masks for tank crewmen were used to protect the face from flying debris that fell off from the inside of the tank armour  when the armor was hit by the opposing rifle shooting, the helmet protected  head from accidental shots.
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:iconsolidsamurai:
SolidSamurai Featured By Owner Edited Oct 1, 2016
I noticed the tank helmet is softer, probably to protect against banging one's head against the ceiling (since suspension for tanks was cruddy back then; tanks also went over really rough terrain).  If shrapnel was the only problem, it'd probably look similar to the brodie helmet.
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:iconnat-ti:
Nat-ti Featured By Owner Sep 14, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
Ottimo lavoro di ricerche e disegni, molto interessante !
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:iconandreasilva60:
AndreaSilva60 Featured By Owner Sep 14, 2016
Forse l'ideazione e la  documentazione è la parte più interessante.
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:iconwerejaguar:
werejaguar Featured By Owner Sep 2, 2016
this is well done, I would not be able to choose between the P-14 and the SMLE
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:iconandreasilva60:
AndreaSilva60 Featured By Owner Sep 3, 2016
even the English were not sure which one to choose, then chose the SMLE because firing faster, but the P14 was much more precise.
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:iconwerejaguar:
werejaguar Featured By Owner Sep 3, 2016
P14 for sniping SMLE for general fighting, that makes sense
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:iconandreasilva60:
AndreaSilva60 Featured By Owner Sep 5, 2016
British are a very pragmatic people :)
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:iconwerejaguar:
werejaguar Featured By Owner Sep 5, 2016
yes they are
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:iconzazoreal:
Zazoreal Featured By Owner Aug 27, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I never thought i would see stuff like this on deviant art "Cool" :D
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:iconandreasilva60:
AndreaSilva60 Featured By Owner Aug 27, 2016
Thank you, I really like DA because it has so many pulsing souls, some black, others candid.

I could choose a social militaria, but I'm most interested  to the artistic side. :)
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:iconnicholasweed:
nicholasweed Featured By Owner Aug 6, 2016
I have one of those "POA Small Packs", the Entrenching Tool, and the Water Bottle.  But, I think they are all WW2 period.  I seem to recall the pack I have has a 1942 date with the Broad Arrow War Ministry proof mark.  The hand pick that I have is also dated 1942 with the arrow marking.  I have several canteens, one has a 1942 dated strap.  Sometimes I see the canteens with blue, or green enamel.  Some British Canvas is light khaki colored, and some is a gray/blue color?  I don't know why?  Is that a difference between British and Canadian, or  Australian, etc?  I have some WW2 era gas masks, belts, backpacks, side bags, canteens, a canvas holster, ammo pouches, etc.  I mostly know about American issue equipment. 
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:iconandreasilva60:
AndreaSilva60 Featured By Owner Aug 7, 2016
I've seen that the common enamel color is the blue, and I don't know if there were differences between the Dominions equipment  too.

I had many stroll in your galleries and I saw that you have a wonderful collection of military equipment!
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:iconnicholasweed:
nicholasweed Featured By Owner Aug 14, 2016
I was asking a question about the color of the canvas equipment.  I do not know if there is the difference between U.K. and the Commonwealth or not?  I was trying to ask you.  I have seen some jackets with U.K. maker markings, and some with Canada maker's markings.  I mostly just know about American militaria.

I have been uploading information I know, or think about militaria.  I'm trying to be honest.  I mostly just talk about things not in the book, "Doughboy To GI : US Army Clothing and Equipment 1900- 1945" by Kenneth Lewis.  I would consider it a must have refrence book if you wanted to know about American Military equipment in the early 20th Century.  Not every issue item is shown or talked about in the book.  I was just adding info I have learned about things not in it.  It is still a huge amount of good information.
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:icontigerfaceswe:
tigerfaceswe Featured By Owner Aug 5, 2016
I still love that private cap.
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:iconandreasilva60:
AndreaSilva60 Featured By Owner Aug 5, 2016
Simple but a very icon.
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:iconcaptain-torr:
Captain-Torr Featured By Owner Aug 1, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Nicely done old boy. I love English military artifacts from World War 1. In Fact I would say my favorite military faction of World War 1 is the British, probably because my own country stayed out of it for so long and then got in it just as Germany collapsed.
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:iconandreasilva60:
AndreaSilva60 Featured By Owner Aug 1, 2016
Thank you mate! I know it's not my business, butI wonder .... were your ancestors mostly british?
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:iconcaptain-torr:
Captain-Torr Featured By Owner Aug 1, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Actually yes I do have some British heritage in my family tree, mostly on my mothers side. But there is also Dutch German Italian French and Polish. Possibly some balkan states as well such as Greek, but I don't know for sure.
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:iconandreasilva60:
AndreaSilva60 Featured By Owner Aug 1, 2016
Wow, America is a real  melting pot!  Thank you my friend!
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:iconcaptain-torr:
Captain-Torr Featured By Owner Aug 1, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Yes it is a melting pot, for those that are willing to assimilate.
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:iconandreasilva60:
AndreaSilva60 Featured By Owner Aug 1, 2016
I can say the same for Italy......
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:iconcaptain-torr:
Captain-Torr Featured By Owner Aug 1, 2016  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Actually on a strange note my family make up actually starts melting before they came to the new world. For example the Polish in my family was supposedly a priest and the Italian was his lady servant. Im sure you can put one and one together and figure out what happened.
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:iconandreasilva60:
AndreaSilva60 Featured By Owner Aug 1, 2016
Wow!  Let me think............  it sound like "be fruitful and multiply"
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(1 Reply)
:iconmanchild70:
manchild70 Featured By Owner Jul 28, 2016
Looks Good. What nation will you do next?
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:iconandreasilva60:
AndreaSilva60 Featured By Owner Jul 28, 2016
Mmmmm, I think it would be a table about melèe weapon. 
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:iconmrmdskinner:
mrmdskinner Featured By Owner Jul 27, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Great work once again!
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:iconandreasilva60:
AndreaSilva60 Featured By Owner Jul 27, 2016
Thank you!
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:iconedwardianclackdish:
EdwardianClackdish Featured By Owner Jul 27, 2016
Seems strange thinking about it now that the gas masks protected soldiers from poisonous gases, only to subject them to asbestos...
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:iconashleyblackwater:
AshleyBlackwater Featured By Owner Jul 27, 2016
The asbestos wasn't as big a danger back them as it is now. It only becomes a danger when it breaks down which wouldn't happen if you treated your mask with care.
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:iconedwardianclackdish:
EdwardianClackdish Featured By Owner Jul 27, 2016
Very true. Maintaining the mask was as important as maintaining their rifles. Both (for a lack of better words) could be the difference between life or death.
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:iconashleyblackwater:
AshleyBlackwater Featured By Owner Jul 27, 2016
If I remember correctly gas wasn't used on a huge scale that much so it didn't matter. As long as you didn't smash the filter of your mask open then it was fine for the most part. The stuff in the filter only breaks easaly now because of all the time it has had to break down, plus I don't think every country used asbestos in the filters, might have only been the British.
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:iconedwardianclackdish:
EdwardianClackdish Featured By Owner Jul 27, 2016
Did a little looking around. Most gas masks issued in the first world war used activated charcoal and a mixture of shells and seeds from fruits and nuts.

It seems that there was asbestos used in the liners of Brodie helmets. Gas masks however were very far and in between. Individual in the Great War were very unlikely to have been exposed to asbestos, unlike the Second World War or Korea. The general concensus is to never use a vintage gas mask and take care when handling it.

Hm. That rusty Brodie lying beside my book case is starting to look more sinister...
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:iconashleyblackwater:
AshleyBlackwater Featured By Owner Jul 28, 2016
Yeah its common sense not to wear any old mask even if it has been made safe (unless you know 100% that its clean). As for the asbestos in other stuff isn't it only the blue kind thats dangerous? An old helmet should be fine by the way, jsut treat it with care ;)
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:iconedwardianclackdish:
EdwardianClackdish Featured By Owner Jul 28, 2016
WW2 era gas masks used blue asbestos and white asbestos (crocidolite and chrysotile). Both are equally dangerous, white asbestos more than blue from what I've heard. It seems that nearly all combatants of WW2 used it in their gas masks with the exception of Italy.

The previous owner had removed a majority of the liner and used it as a flower pot. It was a pretty cute idea. :)
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:iconashleyblackwater:
AshleyBlackwater Featured By Owner Jul 28, 2016
Oh right in that case I should probably get my mask from the war looked at to make sure they are safe XD, I have a German civilians mask but the filter is completely intact (although its covered in some sort of white powder).

And if the liner is gone then it should defanately be safe, as for the flower pot idea I used to have a German helmet from ww1 with a few big cracks in it, before I sold it I was planning on planting  flowers under it and having them grow through the cracks, I think I was going to use the flowers that grow in Flanders fields fr it.
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(1 Reply)
:iconandreasilva60:
AndreaSilva60 Featured By Owner Jul 27, 2016
Ya, you're right, I also use the mask while in the military, at that time, little was known of the risk.
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:iconedwardianclackdish:
EdwardianClackdish Featured By Owner Jul 27, 2016
Just like asbestos, lead paint was nothing to worry about at the time. If you don't mind me asking, when did you serve?
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:iconandreasilva60:
AndreaSilva60 Featured By Owner Jul 28, 2016
I was born in 1960, I've served in 1981 in the horse artillery, well, we had the self propelled howitzer M109, but an horse battery too, we had about 100 horses in the barraks and three goats to calm they nerve when they were nervous :)
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:iconedwardianclackdish:
EdwardianClackdish Featured By Owner Jul 28, 2016
Sounds like a unique experience working with the horse artillery. :) I assume your unit was equipped with the OTO Melara Model 56?
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:iconandreasilva60:
AndreaSilva60 Featured By Owner Jul 28, 2016
we had the 155/23 howitzer M109  and some very old M44 for driving school, but I launched Pilot Balloon to for measuring wind speed and correct the shot  :(
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:iconedwardianclackdish:
EdwardianClackdish Featured By Owner Jul 30, 2016
You helped ensure your comrades aim was more accurate. Insignificant as it may seem, it helped bring about better results. :)
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:iconandreasilva60:
AndreaSilva60 Featured By Owner Jul 31, 2016
Yes, true, it was a very complex gear!
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:iconanybronym0ti0n:
Anybronym0ti0n Featured By Owner Jul 27, 2016
The funny thing is...


...a primitive club made of a stick with nails pierced into it was seen as fair weapon in trench warfare.

And a shotgun was considered barbaric.
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:iconandreasilva60:
AndreaSilva60 Featured By Owner Jul 27, 2016
It was a real crap. Barbed wire, clave, maces, knives, brass knuckles, bayonets, machine guns, hand grenades, gas, explosions of shells, typhoid, tuberculosis, cholera, trachoma, a hell on earth.
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:iconartlovr59:
artlovr59 Featured By Owner Jul 27, 2016   Photographer
Very good illustrations. I am familiar (a bit) with the SMLE or simply Lee Enfield as most people referred to it. Compared to a Mauser, it has a pretty short drawback on the bolt. I think that helped them with the fast shooting. We were given a few "introductory" shots with it in the Army and I shot a friend's one on his farm.

The other info is cool, too. We've just two weeks ago had the Centenary of South Africa's heaviest loss in a battle, at Delville Wood in July 1916, which was 80 percent losses. So I've thought a lot about WWI recently. That mustn't happen again!
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:iconandreasilva60:
AndreaSilva60 Featured By Owner Jul 27, 2016
I shot with the .22, unfortunately not at maximum weapon possibilities. The First World War was really a horrible mass murder, from then on, killing has almost become a f .... industrial process.  Crossing fingers my friend!
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:iconartlovr59:
artlovr59 Featured By Owner Jul 27, 2016   Photographer
.22 are fun, but still not toys!!
Yes, I really feel with our weapons nowadays we need to play video games or something, they're too terrible!
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:iconandreasilva60:
AndreaSilva60 Featured By Owner Jul 27, 2016
I totally agree! 
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:iconartlovr59:
artlovr59 Featured By Owner Jul 28, 2016   Photographer
:)
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:iconpsykohilly:
PsykoHilly Featured By Owner Edited Jul 27, 2016
Now, what a cool tank helmet and mask ... it would be useful to decorate my cave.
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