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Albertonykus
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Build-a-Bird

Ensonglopedia of Animals

My Little Maniraptor: Tea with Chaos

Dinosaur Highlights of 2019

My Little Maniraptor: Vs. Changelings

Several Coly Birds

Foraging at SVP 2019

My Little Maniraptor: Flying Buddies

My Little Maniraptor: Just Flutters

My Little Maniraptor: The End

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Spotlight

The Cartoon Guide to Vertebrate Evolution

213Comments

Build-a-Bird

Ensonglopedia of Animals

My Little Maniraptor: Tea with Chaos

Dinosaur Highlights of 2019

My Little Maniraptor: Vs. Changelings

Several Coly Birds

Foraging at SVP 2019

My Little Maniraptor: The End

Twitter Nightjar

Strisores Phylogeny

Spinosaurus lineart

La Brea tar pits

THE RAPTOR KING!

More hypothetical than I'd like...

Pato arcoiris

Went to the Otway Dinosaurs

Went to the Otway Dinosaurs

...it was great. Pat Vickers-Rich was the main speaker, though while Tom was quieter, he appeared to remember more specific things better. I actually kinda saw them as a Phineas and Ferb like duo (oh lord, here he goes again) - Pat was the talkative and outgoing one, while Tom knew the specifics. Heck, Pat even called him her "calculator". XD They basically just talked about the Victorian dinosaur fauna, as well as some stories they had while doing it. Anyway, the most exciting part was definitely the fact that we have some new info on the animals from Cretaceous Victoria, though I don't think any of the info has been described yet (minus the

First evidence of feathers in a megalosauroid!

First evidence of feathers in a megalosauroid!

Charig Milner, Alexander Kellner, Paul Sereno, Jack Horner, Octavio Mateus, Luis Chiappe, Xu Xing, Elia Smaniotto "First direct evidence of feathers in a non-coelurosaurian dinosaur (Megalosauroidea, Spinosauridae) and the institution of a new species of a feathered tetanuran, Suchopteryx hispanicus." Acta Palaeontologica Foolonica, 56 (2),  sent on the 3rd  of January 2012, accepted manuscript on the 1st of April 2012. Abstract. In the last twenty years, they've been discovered worldwide at least 23 species of dinosaurs with preserved feathers, without counting more problematic specimens referred to ornitischian dinosaurs and a carcharodont

Utahraptor

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My Bio

PhD student studying extant and fossil birds. Alternatively, parvicursorine or near parvicursorine alvarezsaurid described by Longrich & Currie (2009).


Favourite Visual Artist
Jason Brougham, Brian Choo, Matt Martyniuk, Luis Rey, Michael Skrepnick, Emily Willoughby, Mark Witton, etc.
Favourite TV Shows
Phineas and Ferb, The Life of Birds, The Life of Mammals, Africa, The Hunt, Animaniacs, Earthflight, Planet Dinosaur, Dinosaur Revolution
Favourite Books
Dinosaurs: The Most Complete, Up-to-Date Encyclopedia for Dinosaur Lovers of All Ages, Avian Evolution, A Field Guide to Mesozoic Birds and Other Winged Dinosaurs, The Ancestor's Tale, The Bartimaeus Trilogy, The Animals of Farthing Wood
Tools of the Trade
Pencils, an eraser, a blank notebook, and a drawing tablet
Other Interests
Phylogenetics, Zoology, Paleontology
Sorry, didn't forget to do a song cover this week. This one is from the brilliant Ensonglopedia of Animals. Probably the only song I know to invoke sympathy for a leech.
New blog post, on the function and lifestyle of alvarezsaurids.
Something a little different this week. Many far superior covers of this song exist, but I couldn't not do this one.

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Related to Mark Witton's recent blogpost:

About the idea of dromeosaurs not being capable of extended pursuit due to their less cursorial leg proportions compared to specialized runners, isn't this something far more related to aerobic capacity than leg anatomy? Sure, they weren't the fastest predators, but with the theropod respiratory system they likely still had decent endurance, similarly to mustelids (non-cursorial animals that are still capable of extended movements at speed).

Yes, I suppose we can't rule out that possibility. I doubt extended pursuit was the primary hunting method of dromaeosaurids, but that doesn't necessarily mean they were incapable of it.

It should also be noted that there are a few dromeosaur trackways that show these animals covering ground-not running, simply travelling-at a similar pace to animals known for good stamina such as wolverines or large canids (Kim et al. 2008; Li et al. 2007; Murdoch et al. 2010).

For some of the incredibly robust taxa like Utahraptor extended pursuit might not be feasible, but it may have been a thing for more generalized eudromaeosaurs (albeit not at speeds similar to true cursorial specialists and not as their main hunting behaviour)

InmyarmsinmyarmsStudent Writer
Plot twist: pelagornithids are ichthyornitheans that lost their teeth and "regained" them.
Atlantis536Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Do you know where I can find a list of all non-neornithine Mesozoic dinosaurs?
There's the A Dinosaur A Day masterlist (which includes all dinosaurs but categorizes them by taxonomy, so you can separate out the non-neornitheans easily). Thomas Holtz's list covers all Mesozoic dinosaurs... but it hasn't been updated since early 2012. You can also try consulting a list that includes all non-avialan dinosaurs (like The Compact Thescelosaurus) and combining that with a list that includes Mesozoic avialans (like The Theropod Database). Additionally, I maintain my own (genus-level) list of Mesozoic maniraptors, which of course includes Mesozoic avialans.
Atlantis536Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thanks for the resources. There sure are a lot of Mesozoic dinosaurs!