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A camera shy mantis. Taken at night in Singapore forest.

Quote from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mantis
Mantodea (or mantises, mantes) is an order of insects that contains over 2,400 species and about 430 genera[1] in 15 families worldwide in temperate and tropical habitats. Most of the species are in the family Mantidae.

The English common name for the order is the mantises, or rarely (using a Latinized plural of Greek mantis), the mantes. The name mantid refers only to members of the family Mantidae, which was, historically, the only family in the Order, but with 14 additional families recognized in recent decades, this term can be confusing. The other common name, often applied to any species in the order, is "praying mantis",[2] because of the typical "prayer-like" posture with folded fore-limbs, although the eggcorn "preying mantis" is sometimes used in reference to their predatory habits.[3][4] In Europe and other regions, however, the name "praying mantis" refers to only a single species, Mantis religiosa. The closest relatives of mantises are the termites and cockroaches (order Blattodea). They are sometimes confused with phasmids (stick/leaf insects) and other elongated insects such as grasshoppers and crickets, or other insects with raptorial forelegs such as mantisflies.
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© Irene Horvath

Please do not copy without my written permission. Thank you.
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Facebook : Aegir Photography
500px : 500px.com/photo/81327125/ghost…

Another new location, my first visit to Ghosties Beach, near Snapper Point on the central coast of New South Wales. At low tide there is a cave which is accessible and I was able to get a few nice compositions from within the cave mouth.

Nikon D800 & Nikkor 16-35mm, Lee 1.2 GND filter. PP in PS CC using Nik Software and luminosity masks.
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This Planthopper(?) nymph moves and looked like a jumping spider and almost had be fooled when viewed with naked eyes.

Quote from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mimicry
In evolutionary biology, mimicry is a similarity of one species to another which protects one or both.[1] This similarity can be in appearance, behaviour, sound, scent or location. Mimics are found in the same areas as their models.[2]

Mimicry occurs when a group of organisms,[3] the mimics, evolve to share common perceived characteristics with another group, the models.[4] The evolution is driven by the selective action of a signal-receiver or dupe.[5] Birds, for example, use sight to identify palatable insects (the mimics), whilst avoiding the noxious models.

Though visual mimicry is most obvious to humans, other senses such as olfaction (smell) or hearing may be involved, and more than one type of signal may be employed.[2] Mimicry may involve morphology, behaviour, and other properties. In any case, the signal always functions to deceive the receiver by preventing it from correctly identifying the mimic. In evolutionary terms, this phenomenon is a form of co-evolution usually involving an evolutionary arms race.[8]p161 It should not be confused with convergent evolution, which occurs when species come to resemble one another independently by adapting to similar lifestyles.

Mimics may have different models for different life cycle stages, or they may be polymorphic, with different individuals imitating different models. Models themselves may have more than one mimic, though frequency dependent selection favors mimicry where models outnumber mimics. Models tend to be relatively closely related organisms,[9] but mimicry of vastly different species is also known. Most known mimics are insects,[2] though many other animal mimics, including mammals, are known. Plants and fungi may also be mimics, though less research has been carried out in this area.
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Taken at night in Singapore forest.

Quote from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tettigon…
Tettigoniids may be distinguished from the grasshopper by the length of their filamentous antennae, which may exceed their own body length, while grasshoppers' antennae are always relatively short and thickened.

The males of tettigoniids have sound-producing organs (via stridulation) located on the hind angles of their front wings. In some species females are also capable of stridulation. The males provide a nuptial gift for the females in the form of a spermatophylax, a body attached to the males' spermatophore and consumed by the female. The function of the spermatophylax is to increase the attachment time of the male's spermatophore and thereby increase his paternity.[2]

The eggs of tettigoniids are typically oval-shaped and laid in rows on the host plant.

The diet of tettigoniids includes leaves, flowers, bark, and seeds, but many species are exclusively predatory, feeding on other insects, snails or even small vertebrates such as snakes and lizards. Some are also considered pests by commercial crop growers and are sprayed to limit growth, but population densities are usually low, so a large economic impact is rare.[4] Large tettigoniids can inflict a painful bite or pinch if handled but seldom break the skin.
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First time seeing them "Kiss" even though these are very common here. Taken at night in Singapore forest.

Quote from en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archaeog…
The Archaeognatha are an order of wingless insects, also known as jumping bristletails. They are among the least evolutionarily changed insects, appearing in the Middle Devonian period along with the arachnids. They are known from both body and trace fossils (the latter including body imprints and trackways) throughout the remainder of the Paleozoic Era.[2] The name Archaeognatha is derived from Greek, archaeos meaning "ancient" and gnatha meaning "jaw". This refers to the articulation of the mandibles, which has a single condyle, where all higher insects have two. An alternate name, Microcoryphia, comes from the Greek micro, meaning "small", and coryphia, meaning head.

Archaeognaths are found in a wide range of habitats, and are unusual among insects in that they can even be found in the Arctic, where they live in leaf litter and rock crevices. While most species are found in moist soil, others have adapted to chaparral, and even sandy deserts. They feed primarily on algae, but also lichens, mosses, or decaying organic materials.

During courtship, the males spin a thread from their abdomens, attach one end to the substrate, and string packages of sperm (spermatophores) along it. After a series of courtship dances, the female picks up the spermatophores and places them on her ovipositor. The female then lays a batch of around 30 eggs in a suitable crevice. The young resemble the adults, and take up to two years to reach sexual maturity. Unlike most insects, the adults continue to moult after reaching adulthood, and typically mate once at each instar. Archaeognaths may have a total lifespan of up to four years, longer than many larger insects.
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A bee precariously balanced in my garden :)
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Photograph taken by me, edited by the wonderful steffy-beff. Our first collaborative effort together. ^^
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© ChristineAmat

www.christineamat.com
www.abstractions.fr

Les photos sur mes galeries ne sont pas libres de droits - Toutes reproductions et/ou manipulations interdites sans mon accord écrit.
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