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:iconcoduty36:
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Matte painting
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The Spirit of Java and her sister ship from the Unified Earth armada cruising out of the earth atmosphere.
They're about 1.6km long probably, or maybe a bit longer..

Anyway, I just used one of my country's island as the name :P

Hope you all like!

Done with Photoshop
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just so you know i haven't been doing nothing during the time between my last post and this D:

~feedback will be appreciated~
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HrathNir Dragonfly

H: 4m
W: 1.2t
Weapon: 50cal Mini Uranium Slug Launcher.
Cutter Laser.
Plasma concentrator blast.
3 EMP Mines
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Featured
:iconrinatik91:
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A concept for ''Iron Grip: Marauders'' by ISOTX
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Mother
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Concept art for an MMO Turn Based Strategy ''March of War'' by ISOTX

www.isotx.com
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Here's the final piece I painted for the 3145 line of Battletech books, the print TRO cover.

A continuation of the scene on the Field Manual cover, the Republic's defense of the starport continues into the night as forces withdraw. A Clan Wolf Warwolf foolishly closes with an Ares tripod only to receive a punch that tears out it's side. Simian Battle Armor swarm the Warwolf to ensure it stays down. A Night Stalker medium mech rushes in to aid in holding the defensive line.
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armors
:iconmanuel115:
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designs based off concept by Artyom Vlaskin:
[link]

all 3 share a single 1024x1024 diffuse texture.
comments welcome
-enjoy!
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WOW style weapons study
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Daggers and swords I made for Mists of Pandaria (World of Warcraft).
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Axes I made for Mists of Pandaria.
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Quick exploration of various sword shapes. I realised that they become characters themselves, the more unique details you add. Giving these things somewhat memorable names does help as well to define the final look.
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Vehicles
:iconisra-ac:
Collection by
Grey O_o
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Marauders Airship design for the Iron Grip Universe by ISOTX

www.isotx.com
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Light Royal Airforce Airship Design for an unannounced project by ISOTX

www.isotx.com
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Medium Royal Airforce Airship Design for an unannounced project by ISOTX

www.isotx.com
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JIXIE
:iconqianhonglee:
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Some racer i guess :)

This was a livestream painting. Here is my art channel [link]

Steps [link]
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:iconshtl: graced me with a premium membership, many thanks bro:iconhappytearsplz: tech time B tech time. Need to check darpa's labs O.O
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need to do more of these type
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(C) Chronicles of the Void
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forgot to upload this, another comission work i did months ago from COTV

(C) Chronicles Of The Void
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Mil
:iconejo1996:
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Super carrier murasamei tian lei is also one of my awesome work, cause, believe it, I use da line tool to draw da whole ship out!

BG credits goes to RM2K BG sets..
XD
oh..and more "battle city advance" pics also comming soon...
I am a mecha and chibi freak..XD
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speed paint for a facebook group. 

here is some other places on the net i post more art. come and say hi :)
Facebook
Twitter
Instagram
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Daz Studio 4.6 > The Foundry: Modo 801
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A 'fan commission' for :iconhorn-adama: ~Horn-Adama

Two rangers. An Elemental powered armor with sword drawn, and a specops soldier with battle rifle leveled. They have each others backs , ready for the swarm that is about to fall on them.

Thanks to everyone that watched in the streams, keeping me company and providing valuable critiques. And another thanks to Horn for the commission, without it this nice piece of work wouldn't have happened.

Fluff - The Shield Sword is a basic shield based weapon that was devised during the early testing of the mysterious new technology. It allowed the test deployment of shields in a simple device that could be used without implants.
No longer commonly used due to the restriction of shield material and advancement of dynamic internal battle armor shields. It is now only seen ceremonially or among a select few who have stuck to it's use, it still retains it's diversity as an easily deployed utility weapon. It can form a heat blade, defensive bubble or wall, and counter frequency fields and paths to better penetrate projectiles, or any other specialized form that is programmed in.
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some development stuff from my various sketchbooks. i came up with the design almost a year ago. ill probably keep developing it, but this will be the cornerstone for future designs.

final product: [link]

bert
all this (c) me (Robert Chew 2009)
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Craft
:icontalonv:
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Speedpaint!

I was doodling some Nighthawk aerosaurs the other day and decided to slap in a background because I liked these little buggers LOL

I also wanted to show how aerosaurs can really fold up into something that much more resembles the aircraft the’re based on - the more modern the ‘saur, the better they can do this. As the first operational stealth fighter, the F-117 would be one of the first aerosaurs to really exploit this. (Of course they revert to full aircraft form for maximum efficiency. As these creatures evolve, all their “modes” slowly start to blend into some sort of weird ultimate form haha.)

....I also just wanted to draw something really angular, LOL

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This is a part sheet for the Bell V-280 Valor Family
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The V-22 Osprey is a multi-mission, military tiltrotor aircraft with both a vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) and short takeoff and landing (STOL) capability. It is designed to perform missions like a conventional helicopter with the long-range, high-speed cruise performance of a turboprop aircraft. The V-22 was developed by Bell Helicopter, which manufactures it in partnership with Boeing Helicopters. The initial operators are the United States Marine Corps and Air Force. The FAA classifies the Osprey as a model of powered lift aircraft.

The Department of Defense began the V-22 program in 1981, first under US Army leadership, then the US Navy/Marine Corps later took the lead in developing what was then known as the Joint-service Vertical take-off/landing Experimental (JVX) aircraft.[3][4] Full-scale development of the V-22 tilt-rotor aircraft began in 1986.[5]
Early concept illustrations of V-22

The V-22 was developed and is built jointly by Bell Helicopter, which manufactures and integrates the wing, nacelles, rotors, drive system, tail surfaces, and aft ramp, as well as integrates the Rolls-Royce engines, and Boeing Helicopters, which manufactures and integrates the fuselage, cockpit, avionics, and flight controls. Portions of the aircraft are manufactured in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Grand Prairie, Texas, and Fort Worth, Texas. Final assembly, flight testing, and delivery occurs in Amarillo, Texas. The joint development team is known as Bell Boeing.[6][7]

The first of six MV-22 prototypes first flew on 19 March 1989 in the helicopter mode and on 14 September 1989 as a fixed-wing plane. The third and fourth prototypes successfully completed the Osprey's first Sea Trials on the USS Wasp in December 1990. However, the fourth and fifth prototypes crashed in 1990-91. Flight tests were resumed in August 1993 after changes were incorporated in the prototypes.[5]

Flight testing of four full-scale development V-22s began in early 1997 when the first pre-production V-22 was delivered to the Naval Air Warfare Test Center in Patuxent River, MD. The first EMD Flight took place on 5 February 1997. The first of four low-rate initial production aircraft, ordered on 28 April 1997, was delivered on 27 May 1999. Osprey number 10 completed the program's second Sea Trials, this time from the USS Saipan in January 1999.[5] During external load testing in April 1999, Boeing used a V-22 to lift and transport the M777 howitzer.[8]

In 2000 there were two further fatal crashes, killing a total of 19 Marines, and the production was again halted while the cause of these crashes was investigated and various parts were redesigned.[9]

The V-22 completed its final operational evaluation in June 2005.[10] The evaluation was deemed successful; events included long range deployments, high altitude, desert and shipboard operations. It was claimed that the problems identified in various accidents had been addressed by the V-22 program office.
V-22 in flight.

On 28 September 2005, the Pentagon formally approved full-rate production for the V-22. The plan was to boost production from 11 a year to between 24 and 48 a year by 2012. Planned production quantities include 360 for the Marine Corps, 48 for the Navy, and 50 for the Air Force. The U.S. Army, originally the lead service for the then-named JVX program, is a possible candidate for use.

The V-22 had a flyaway cost of $70 million per aircraft in 2007,[2] but the Navy hopes to shave about $10 million off that price after a five-year production contract starts in 2008.[11]

A total of 458 V-22s are expected to be built for the USMC, US Air Force and US Navy at an average unit cost of $110 million per aircraft.[1]

Israel has shown interest in the purchase of an undisclosed number of MV-22s, but an order has not been placed or approved.[12]
Please help improve this section by expanding it
with: Add JVX competition details, etc.. Further information might be found on the talk page or at requests for expansion. (January 2008)

[edit] Controversy

The V-22's development process has been long and controversial. When the development budget, first projected at $2.5 billion in 1986, increased to $30 billion in 1988, then-Defense Secretary Dick Cheney tried to zero out its funding. He was eventually overruled by Congress.[9] As of September 2007, the Osprey program spent $20 billion over 25 years of development, and will require another $35 billion from the Pentagon before the program is completed.[13]

The V-22 squadron's former commander at Marine Corps Air Station New River, Lieutenant Colonel Odin Lieberman, was relieved of duty in 2001 after allegations that he instructed his unit that they needed to falsify maintenance records to make the plane appear more reliable.[5]

The aircraft is incapable of autorotation in the case of engine failure, a fact that led a director of the Pentagon's testing office in 2005 to say that if the Osprey loses power while flying like a helicopter below 1,600 feet (490 m), emergency landings "are not likely to be survivable". But Captain Justin (Moon) McKinney, a V-22 pilot, says that this will not be a problem, "We can turn it into a plane and glide it down, just like a C-130".[13] A complete loss of power would require the failure of both engines, as a drive shaft connects the nacelles through the wing; one engine can power both proprotors.[14]

In 2000 Boeing announced that all V-22s were going to be fitted with a nose mounted GAU-19 Gatling gun, to provide "the V-22 with a strong defensive firepower capability to greatly increase the aircraft's survivability in hostile actions."[15] But the GAU-19 project was canceled, leading to criticism by retired Marine General James L. Jones, who is not satisfied with the current V-22 armament.[13]

With the first combat deployment of the MV-22 in October 2007, Time Magazine ran an article condemning the aircraft as unsafe, overpriced, and completely inadequate.[13] The Marine Corps, however, responded with the assertion that much of the article's data were dated, obsolete, inaccurate, and reflected expectations that ran too high for any new field of aircraft.[16]

[edit] Design
First production Osprey to join the V-22 Navy flight test program since resumption of flight evaluations in May 2002. Aircraft is shown in compact storage configuration.

The Osprey is the world's first production tiltrotor aircraft, with one three-bladed proprotor, turboprop engine, and transmission nacelle mounted on each wingtip. For takeoff and landing, it typically operates as a helicopter with the nacelles vertical (rotors horizontal). Once airborne, the nacelles rotate forward 90° in as little as 12 seconds for horizontal flight, converting the V-22 to a more fuel-efficient, higher-speed turboprop airplane. STOL rolling-takeoff and landing capability is achieved by having the nacelles tilted forward up to 45°. For compact storage and transport, the V-22's wing rotates to align, front-to-back, with the fuselage. The proprotors can also fold in a sequence taking 90 seconds.[17]

The V-22 is equipped with a glass cockpit, which incorporates four Multi-Function Displays (MFDs) and one shared Central Display Unit (CDU), allowing the pilots to display a variety of images including: digimaps centered or decentered on current position, FLIR imagery, primary flight instruments, navigation (TACAN, VOR, ILS, GPS, INS), and system status. The flight director panel of the Cockpit Management System (CMS) allows for fully-coupled (aka: autopilot) functions which will take the aircraft from forward flight into a 50-foot hover with no pilot interaction other than programming the system.[18]
M240 machine gun mounted on V-22 loading ramp.

The V-22 is a fly-by-wire aircraft with triple-redundant flight control systems. With the nacelles pointing straight up in conversion mode at 90° the flight computers command the aircraft to fly like a helicopter, with cyclic forces being applied to a conventional swashplate at the rotor hub. With the nacelles in airplane mode (0°;) the flaperons, rudder, and elevator fly the aircraft like an airplane. This is a gradual transition which occurs over the entire 96° range of the nacelles. The lower the nacelles, the greater effect of the airplane-mode control surfaces.

The Osprey is armed with one .308 in (7.62 mm) caliber machine gun pointing rearward that can be fired when the loading ramp is lowered. A GAU-19 three-barrel .50 in (12.7 mm) gatling gun mounted below the V-22's nose has also been studied for future upgrade.[13][19] BAE Systems is also developing a remotely operated turreted weapons system for the V-22.[20]

[edit] Operational history
Two USAF CV-22s, landing at Holloman AFB, NM, 2006.

USMC crew training on the Osprey has been conducted by VMMT-204 since March 2000. On 3 June 2005, the Marine Corps helicopter squadron Marine Medium Helicopter 263 (HMM-263), stood down to begin the process of transitioning to the MV-22 Osprey. On 8 December 2005, Lieutenant General Amos, commander of the II MEF, accepted the delivery of the first fleet of MV-22s, delivered to HMM-263. The unit reactivated on 3 March 2006 as the first MV-22 squadron and was redesignated VMM-263. On 31 August 2006, VMM-162 (the former HMM-162) followed suit. On 23 March 2007, HMM-266 became Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 266 (VMM-266) at Marine Corps Air Station New River, North Carolina.

The Air Force's first operational CV-22 Osprey was delivered to the 58th Special Operations Wing (58th SOW) at Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico on 20 March 2006. This and subsequent aircraft will become part of the 58th SOW's fleet of aircraft used for training pilots and crew members for special operations use.[21]
A MV-22 of VMM-162 in Iraq, April 2008.

On 10 July 2007 an MV-22 Osprey landed aboard the Royal Navy aircraft carrier, HMS Illustrious in the Atlantic Ocean. This marked the first time an MV-22 had landed on any non-US vessel.[22]

The Osprey entered operational service with the Marine Corps in 2007, in some cases replacing existing CH-46 Sea Knight squadrons.[23] On 13 April 2007 the United States Marine Corps announced that it would be sending 10 V-22 aircraft to Iraq, the Osprey's first combat deployment. Marine Corps commandant, Gen. James Conway, indicated that over 150 Marines would accompany the Osprey set for September deployment to Al-Asad Airfield.[24][25] On 17 September 2007, 10 MV-22Bs of VMM-263 left for Iraq aboard the USS Wasp. The decision to use a ship rather than use the Osprey's self-deployment capability was made because of concerns over icing during the North Atlantic portion of the trip, lack of available KC-130s for mid-air refueling, and the availability of the USS Wasp.[26]
Crew members refuel an MV-22 before a night mission in central Iraq, February 2008.

The Osprey has provided support in Iraq, racking up some 2000 flight hours over three months with a mission capable availability rate of 68.1% as of late January 2008.[27] They are primarily used in Iraq's western Anbar province for routine cargo and troop movements, and also for riskier "aero-scout" missions. Gen. David Petraeus, the top U.S. military commander in Iraq, used one to fly around Iraq on Christmas Day, 2007, to visit troops.[28] Then-presidential candidate Barack Obama also flew in Ospreys during his high profile 2008 tour of Iraq.[29] The only major problem has been obtaining the necessary spare parts to maintain the aircraft.[30] Minor problems included the engines wearing quicker than desired, on four occasions V-22s at forward bases were grounded until repairs could be made to the oil cooling systems, and on one occasion a V-22 was forced to make an emergency landing due to engine damage.[31][verification needed]

[edit] Variants

CV-22A
Air Force aircraft used as a transport from land bases.[32]

MV-22B
Basic US Marine Corps transport; original requirement for 552 (now 360). The Marine Corps is the lead service in the development of the V-22 Osprey. The Marine Corps variant, the MV-22B, is an assault transport for troops, equipment and supplies, capable of operating from ships or from expeditionary airfields ashore. It is replacing the Marine Corps CH-46E and CH-53D. As of March 2007, the Marines have activated three operational Osprey squadrons.[33][34]

Osprey at NAS Pensacola, November 2006

CV-22B
Operated by the Air Force for the U.S. Special Operations Command (USSOCOM), will conduct long-range, special operations missions, and is equipped with extra fuel tanks.[35] The Air Force officially accepted the CV-22 on 16 November 2006 in a ceremony conducted at Hurlburt Field in Northwest Florida.[36]

HV-22B
The planned, but not-yet-funded, United States Navy HV-22 will provide combat search and rescue, delivery and retrieval of special warfare teams along with fleet logistic support transport.[37]

[edit] Operators

United States

* United States Air Force
o 8th Special Operations Squadron (8 SOS) at Hurlburt Field, Florida
o 71st Special Operations Squadron (71 SOS) at Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico
o 20th Special Operations Squadron (20 SOS) at Cannon Air Force Base, New Mexico
* United States Marine Corps
o VMM-162
o VMM-261
o VMM-263
o VMM-266
o VMMT-204 - Training squadron
o VMX-22 - Marine Tiltrotor Operational Test and Evaluation Squadron

[edit] Notable accidents

Main article: Accidents and incidents involving the V-22 Osprey

A U.S. V-22 Osprey tiltrotor aircraft flies a test mission

From 1991 to 2000 there were four significant crashes during testing:[9]

* On 11 June 1991, a mis-wired flight control system led to two minor injuries when the left nacelle struck the ground while the aircraft was hovering 15 feet in the air, causing it to bounce and catch fire.

* On 20 July 1992, a leaking gearbox led to a fire in the right nacelle, causing the aircraft to drop into the Potomac River in front of an audience of Congressmen and other government officials at Quantico, killing all seven on board and grounding the aircraft for 11 months.

* On 8 April 2000, a V-22 loaded with Marines to simulate a rescue, attempted to land at Marana Northwest Regional Airport in Arizona; its right rotor stalled at 245 feet, it rolled over, crashed, and exploded, killing all nineteen on board.

* On 11 December 2000, after a catastrophic hydraulic leak and subsequent instrument failure, a V-22 fell 1,600 feet into a forest in Jacksonville, North Carolina, killing all four aboard.

Since becoming operational in 2006, the V-22 has had seven other notable, but minor incidents.

[edit] Specifications (MV-22B)
A MV-22 Osprey carries an HMMWV

Data from Boeing Integrated Defense Systems,[38] Naval Air Systems Command,[39] and the CV-22 Air Force Fact Sheet.[40]

General characteristics

* Crew: two pilots
* Capacity: 24 troops (seated), 32 troops (floor loaded) or up to 15,000 pounds of cargo
* Length: 57 ft 4 in (17.5 m)
* Rotor diameter: 38 ft 0 in (11.6 m)
* Wingspan: 45 ft 10 in (14 m)
* Width with rotors: 84 ft 7 in (25.8 m)
* Height: 22 ft 1 in/6.73 m; overall with nacelles vertical (17 ft 11 in/5.5 m; at top of tailfins)
* Disc area: 2,268 sq ft (212 m²;)
* Wing area: 301.4 sq ft (28 m²;)
* Empty weight: 33,140 lb (15,032 kg)
* Loaded weight: 47,500 lb (21,500 kg)
* Max takeoff weight: 60,500 lb (27,400 kg)
* Powerplant: 2× Rolls-Royce Allison Rolls-Royce T406 (AE 1107C-Liberty) turboshafts, 6,150 hp (4,590 kW) each

Performance

* Maximum speed: 275 knots (316 mph, 509 km/h)
* Cruise speed: 214 knots (246 mph, 396 km/h) at sea level
* Range: 879 nmi (1,011 mi, 1,627 km)
* Combat radius: 370 nmi (430 mi, 690 km)
* Ferry range: 2,417 nm (2,781 mi, 4,476 km)
* Service ceiling 26,000 ft (7,925 m)
* Rate of climb: 2,320 ft/min (11.8 m/s)
* Disc loading: 20.9 lb/sq ft @ 47,500 lb GW (102.23 kg/m²;)
* Power/mass: 0.259 hp/lb (427 W/kg)
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Enola Gay B-29 Superfortress

The Enola Gay is the B-29 Superfortress bomber that dropped the first atomic bomb, code-named "Little Boy", to be used in war, by the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) in the attack on Hiroshima, Japan on 6 August 1945, just before the end of World War II. Because of the bomber's role in the atomic bombings of Japan, its name has been synonymous with the controversy over the bombings themselves. The B-29 was named after Enola Gay Tibbets, the mother of the pilot, Paul Tibbets.[1]

The Enola Gay gained additional national attention in 1995 when the cockpit and nose section of the aircraft was exhibited at the National Air and Space Museum (NASM) of the Smithsonian Institution in downtown Washington, D.C. The exhibit was changed due to a controversy over original historical script displayed with the aircraft. In 2003, the entire restored B-29 Enola Gay went on display at NASM's new Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center.

World War II history

The Enola Gay (B-29-45-MO, serial number 44-86292 [2], victor number 82) was assigned to the USAAF's 393d Bombardment Squadron, Heavy, 509th Composite Group. [3]The bomber was one of 15 B-29s with the "Silverplate" modifications necessary to deliver atomic weapons. Enola Gay was built by the Glenn L. Martin Company at its Bellevue, Nebraska plant at what is now known as Offutt Air Force Base and was personally selected by Colonel Paul W. Tibbets, Jr., commander of the 509th Composite Group, on 9 May 1945 while still on the assembly line. This would be the B-29 that he would use to fly the atomic bomb mission.

The Enola Gay was accompanied by two other B-29s, Necessary Evil which was used as a camera plane to photograph the explosion and effects of the bomb and carry scientific observers, and The Great Artiste which was the blast measurement instrumentation aircraft.
Enola Gay in its 6th BG livery, victor number 82 visible on fuselage just forward of the tail fin

The aircraft was accepted by the USAAF on 18 May 1945, and assigned to Crew B-9 (Captain Robert A. Lewis, aircraft commander), who flew the bomber from Omaha to the 509th's base at Wendover Army Air Field, Utah on 14 June 1945. Thirteen days later, the aircraft left Wendover for Guam, where it received a bomb bay modification and flew to Tinian on 6 July. It was originally given the victor number "12," but on 1 August was given the circle R tail markings of the 6th Bomb Group as a security measure and had its victor changed to "82" to avoid misidentification with actual 6th BG aircraft.

During July of that year, after the bomber flew eight training missions and two combat missions to drop pumpkin bombs on industrial targets at Kobe and Nagoya, Enola Gay was used on 31 July on a rehearsal flight for the actual mission. A "dummy" Little Boy assembly was dropped off Tinian.

On 5 August 1945, during preparation for the first atomic mission, pilot Colonel Paul Tibbets who assumed command of the aircraft, renamed the B-29 after his mother, Enola Gay Tibbets (1893–1983), who had been named for the heroine of a novel. According to Gordon Thomas and Max Morgan-Witts [4], regularly assigned aircraft commander Robert Lewis was unhappy to be displaced by Tibbets for this important mission, and became furious when he arrived at the aircraft on the morning of 6 August to see it painted with the now-famous nose art. Tibbets himself, interviewed on Tinian later that day by war correspondents, confessed that he was a bit embarrassed of having attached his mother's name to such a fateful mission.

The Hiroshima mission had been described as tactically flawless, and Enola Gay returned safely to its base on Tinian to great fanfare on the base. The first atomic bombing was followed three days later by another B-29 (Bockscar) [5] (piloted by Major Charles W. Sweeney) which dropped a second nuclear weapon, "Fat Man", on Nagasaki. The Nagasaki mission, by contrast, had been described as tactically botched, although the mission had met its objectives. The crew encountered a number of problems in execution, and Bockscar had very little fuel by the time it landed on Okinawa.[6] On that mission, Enola Gay, flown by Crew B-10 (Capt. George Marquardt, aircraft commander, see Necessary Evil for crew details), was the weather reconnaissance aircraft for Kokura.

[edit] Subsequent history

On 6 November 1945, Lewis flew the Enola Gay back to the United States, arriving at the 509th's new base at Roswell Army Air Field, New Mexico, on 8 November. On 29 April 1946, Enola Gay left Roswell as part of Operation Crossroads and flew to Kwajalein on 1 May. It was not chosen to make the test drop at Bikini Atoll and left Kwajalein on 1 July, the date of the test, and reached Fairfield-Suisun Army Air Field, California, the next day.
Enola Gay in the Smithsonian storage facility at Suitland, 1987.

The decision was made to preserve the aircraft, and on 24 July 1946, the plane was flown to Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Arizona, in preparation for storage. On 30 August 1946, the title to the aircraft was transferred to the Smithsonian Institution and was removed from the USAAF inventory. From 1946 to 1961, the Enola Gay was put into temporary storage at a number of locations:

* 1 September 1946, Davis-Monthan AFB
* 3 July 1949, Orchard Place Air Field, Park Ridge, Illinois, flown there by Gen. Tibbets for acceptance by the Smithsonian.
* 12 January 1952, Pyote Air Force Base, Texas, moved after O'Hare International Airport's location was announced
* 2 December 1953, Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland
* 10 August 1960, disassembly at Andrews begun by personnel of the Smithsonian
* 21 July 1961, components transported to Smithsonian storage facility at Suitland, Maryland.

Restoration of the bomber began on 5 December 1984, at the Paul E. Garber Preservation, Restoration, and Storage Facility in Suitland.

[edit] Recent developments
Enola Gay today at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center.

Enola Gay became the center of a controversy at the Smithsonian Institution in 1994, when the museum put its fuselage on display as part of an exhibit commemorating the 50th anniversary of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima. The exhibit, "The Crossroads: The End of World War II, the Atomic Bomb and the Cold War", was drafted by the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum and arranged around the restored Enola Gay.

Critics of the exhibit, especially those of the American Legion and the Air Force Association, charged that the exhibit focused too much attention on the Japanese casualties inflicted by the nuclear bomb, rather than on the motivations for the bombing or the discussion of the bomb's role in ending the World War II conflict with Japan. The exhibit brought to national attention many long-standing academic and political issues related to retrospective views of the bombings (see the debate over the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki). As a result, after various attempts to revise the exhibit in order to meet the satisfaction of competing interest groups had failed, the exhibit was canceled on 30 January 1995, though the fuselage did go on display. On 18 May 1998, the fuselage was returned to the Garber Facility for final restoration.
Under the cockpit window of the Enola Gay, while in storage 1987.

The entire aircraft has since been restored for static display and is currently a major permanent exhibit at the National Air and Space Museum's Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center near Dulles International Airport outside of Washington, D.C. As a result of the earlier controversy, the signage around the aircraft provides only the same succinct technical data as is provided for other aircraft in the museum, without discussion of the controversial issues.

The aircraft is shielded by various means to prevent a repetition of the vandalism which was attempted against it when it was first placed on display, which was the throwing of a jar of red paint onto the Enola Gay's wing. A video analytics system was installed in 2005. Multiple surveillance cameras automatically generate an alarm when any person or object approaches the aircraft.

The propellers that were used on the bombing mission were later shipped to Texas A&M University. One of these propellers was trimmed to 12½ ft for use in the university's Oran W. Nicks Low Speed Wind Tunnel. The lightweight aluminum variable pitch propeller is powered by a 1,250 kVA electric motor providing a windspeed up to 200 mph.[7]

[edit] Mission personnel
Bombardier Thomas Ferebee with the Norden Bombsight on Tinian after the dropping of Little Boy.

Enola Gay's crew on 6 August 1945 consisted of 12 men:

(An * denotes regular crewmen of the Enola Gay.)

* Colonel Paul W. Tibbets, Jr. – Pilot and Aircraft commander
* Captain Robert A. Lewis – Co-pilot; Enola Gay's assigned aircraft commander*
* Major Thomas Ferebee – Bombardier
* Captain Theodore "Dutch" Van Kirk – Navigator
* U.S. Navy Captain William S. "Deak" Parsons – Weaponeer and bomb commander
* Lieutenant Jacob Beser – Radar countermeasures (also the only man to fly on both of the nuclear bombing aircraft)
* Second Lieutenant Morris R. Jeppson – Assistant weaponeer
* Technical Sergeant George R. "Bob" Caron – Tail gunner*
* Technical Sergeant Wyatt E. Duzenberry – Flight engineer*
* Sergeant Joe S. Stiborik – Radar operator*
* Sergeant Robert H. Shumard – Assistant flight engineer*
* Private First Class Richard H. Nelson – VHF radio operator*
General characteristics

* Crew: 11: (A/C)Airplane Commander, Pilot, flight engineer (a rated pilot),[26][27]. bombardier, navigator, radio operator, radar operator, blister gunners (two), CFC upper gunner, and tail gunner
* Length: 99 ft 0 in (30.2 m)
* Wingspan: 141 ft 3 in (43.1 m)
* Height: 29 ft 7 in (8.5 m)
* Wing area: 1,736 sqft (161.3 m²;)
* Empty weight: 74,500 lb (33,800 kg)
* Loaded weight: 120,000 lb (54,000 kg)
* Max takeoff weight: 133,500 lb (60,560 kg -- 135,000 lb plus combat load (144,000 lb on record[18]))
* Powerplant: 4× Wright R-3350-23 and 23A turbosupercharged radial engines, 2,200 hp (1,640 kW) each
* * Zero-lift drag coefficient: 0.0241
* Drag area: 41.16 ft² (3.82 m²;)
* Aspect ratio: 11.50

Performance

* Maximum speed: 357 mph (310 knots, 574 km/h)
* Cruise speed: 220 mph (190 knots, 350 km/h)
* Stall speed: 105 mph (91 knots, 170 km/h)
* Combat range: 3,250 mi (2,820 nmi, 5,230 km)
* Ferry range: 5,600 mi (4,900 nmi, 9,000 km, (record 5,839 mi, 5,074 nmi, 9,397 km[18]))
* Service ceiling: 33,600 ft (10,200 m)
* Rate of climb: 900 ft/min (4.6 m/s)
* Wing loading: 69.12 lb/sqft (337 kg/m²;)
* Power/mass: 0.073 hp/lb (121 W/kg)
* Lift-to-drag ratio: 16.8

Armament

* Guns:
o 10× .50 in (12.7 mm) caliber Browning M2/ANs in remote controlled turrets
o 2 x .50 in and 1× 20 mm M2 cannon in tail position (the cannon was eventually removed as it proved unreliable in service )
o B-29B-BW - All armament and sighting equipment removed except for tail position; initially 2 x .50 in M2/AN and 1× 20 mm M2 cannon, later 3 x 2 x .50 in M2/AN with APG-15 gun-laying radar fitted as standard.
* Bombs: 20,000 lb (9,000 kg) standard loadout
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Fairchild-Republic NAW A-10 Warthog

Fairchild Republic and Northrop each built two prototypes for evaluation under the US Air Force's A-X programme, initiated in 1967, for a close support aircraft. The first Fairchild Republic prototype, designated YA-10A, flew for the first time 10 May 1972. It was announced 18 January 1973 that Fairchild was the winner of the competitive evaluation of the prototypes, and received a contract for six A-10A aircraft, the first of which flew 15 February 1975.

The first flight by a production A-10A Thunderbolt II was made 21 October 1975. Purchase of a total of 739 aircraft was planned; but funding was terminated in 1983 after a total of 713 production A-10s had been ordered and delivered. Delivery was completed 20 March 1984. Northrop Grumman acquired the A-10 programme from Fairchild in 1987. The Thunderbolt II was used during the 1991 Gulf War.

Export versions of the A-10 were available as single-seat night attack and two-seat combat-ready trainer aircraft. Night capability is provided by the addition of a Westinghouse WX-50 radar, Texas Instruments AAR-42 FLIR, Litton LN-39 inertial navigation system, Honeywell APN-194 radar altimeter, AiResearch digital air data computer, Ferranti 105 laser range-finder and Kaiser head-up display. It is expected that night/adverse weather capability can be improved with the addition of a LANTIRN (Low-Altitude Navigation Targeting Infra-Red for Night) fire-control pod.

The first combat-ready A-10A wing was the 345th Tactical Fighter Wing, based at Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, to which deliveries began in March 1977.

HISTORY
The N/AW (Night/ Adverse Weather) development effort was jointly funded by the Defense Department and Fairchild Republic to the amount of $5 million and $2 million respectively. As part of this effort, Fairchild leased the first
he purpose of modifying it into an expanded N/AW two-seat version. Because the company had allowed for expansion in the original design, the amount of rework to be performed on the leased plane would not have to be drastic.

Fairchild Republic built two YA-10 prototypes and six YA-10 pre-production aircraft and then built 707 A-10As. They were all single-seat aircraft; the only two-seater ever built was the YA-10B, converted from the first pre-production YA-10A, 73-1664.
In order to improve the A-10A, Fairchild Republic proposed a prototype of a two-seat Night/Adverse Weather version and the proposal was approved by the Air Force. 73-1664 was returned to the old Republic plant at Farmingdale, Long Island, New York, USA, in April 1978, and modified to include a second seat and night-vision avionics. The N/AW version was 200 lbs. heavier than a conventional A-10.

First flight was made from Edwards AFB, Muroc, California, USA on May 4, 1979, but funding for the N/AW A-10 was not provided by the Congress and after modifying this one aircraft, the project (also known as YA-10B ) was dropped. The N/AW A-10 is on display at the Air Force Flight Test Center (AFFTC) Museum at Edwards AFB.

General characteristics

* Crew: 2
* Length: 53 ft 4 in (16.26 m)
* Wingspan: 57 ft 6 in (17.53 m)
* Height: 14 ft 8 in (4.47 m)
* Wing area: 506 ft² (47.0 m²;)
* Airfoil: NACA 6716 root, NACA 6713 tip
* Empty weight: 24,959 lb (11,321 kg)
* Loaded weight:
o Standard: 30,384 lb (13,782 kg)
o On CAS mission: 47,094 lb (21,361 kg)
o On anti-armor mission: 42,071 lb (19,083 kg)
* Max takeoff weight: 50,000 lb (23,000 kg)
* Powerplant: 2× General Electric TF34-GE-100A turbofans, 9,065 lbf (40.32 kN) each

Performance

* Never exceed speed: 450 knots (518 mph,[43] 833 km/h) at 5,000 ft (1,500 m) with 18 Mk 82 bombs[44]
* Maximum speed: 381 knots (439 mph, 706 km/h) at sea level, clean[43]
* Cruise speed: 300 knots (340 mph, 560 km/h)
* Stall speed: 120 knots (220 km/h) [45]
* Combat radius:
o On CAS mission: 250 nmi (288 mi, 460 km) at 1.88 hour single-engine loiter at 5,000 ft (1,500 m), 10 min combat
o On anti-armor mission: 252 nmi (290 mi, 467 km), 40 nm (45 mi, 75 km) sea-level penetration and exit, 30 min combat
* Ferry range: 2,240 nmi (2,580 mi, 4,150 km) with 50 knot (55 mph, 90 km/h) headwinds, 20 minutes reserve
* Service ceiling: 45,000 ft (13,700 m)
* Rate of climb: 6,000 ft/min (30 m/s)
* Wing loading: 99 lb/ft² (482 kg/m²;)
* Thrust/weight: 0.36

Armament

* Guns: 1× 30 mm (1.18 in) GAU-8/A Avenger gatling cannon with 1,174 rounds
* Hardpoints: 11 (8× under-wing and 3× under-fuselage pylon stations) with a capacity of 16,000 lb (7,260 kg),with provisions to carry combinations of:
o Rockets:
+ 4× LAU-61/LAU-68 rocket pods (each with 19× / 7× Hydra 70 mm rockets, respectively)
+ 4× LAU-5003 rocket pods (each with 19× CRV7 70 mm rockets)
+ 6× LAU-10 rocket pods (each with 4× 127 mm (5.0 in) Zuni rockets)
o Missiles:
+ 2× AIM-9 Sidewinders air-to-air missiles for self-defense
+ 8× AGM-65 Maverick air-to-surface missiles
o Bombs:
+ Mark 80 series of unguided iron bombs or
+ Mk 77 incendiary bombs or
+ BLU-1, BLU-27/B Rockeye II, Mk20, BL-755[46] and CBU-52/58/71/87/89/97 cluster bombs or
+ Paveway series of Laser-guided bombs or
+ Joint Direct Attack Munition (A-10C)[47] or
+ Wind Corrected Munitions Dispenser (A-10C)
* SUU-42A/A Flares/Infrared decoys and chaff dispenser pod or
* AN/ALQ-131 & AN/ALQ-184 ECM pods or
* Lockheed Martin Sniper XR & LITENING targeting pods (A-10C) or
* 2× 600 US gallon Sargent Fletcher drop tanks for extended range/loitering time.

Avionics

* AN/AAS-35(V) Pave Penny laser tracker pod[48] (mounted beneath right side of cockpit) for use with Paveway LGBs
* HUD for improved technical flying and air-to-ground support. See video.[2]
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Flugschiffe
:iconibot9393:
Collection by
Some concepts of the ships... Hope you liked them! :)





Have a nice day! :sun:
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Marauders Airship design for the Iron Grip Universe by ISOTX

www.isotx.com
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Marauders Airship design for the Iron Grip Universe by ISOTX

www.isotx.com
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Concept art for an unannounced project by ISOTX

www.isotx.xom

Link to ingame model - [link]
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a pic I painting quickly in the rainy afternoon and it is a gift for one friend.
and say happy birthday to her~~~
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practice
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Concept sketches for the Shenkuu airship, the final version of which was featured in one of the most recent Neopets plots. Lots of references to Chinese junks, fishing ships... It was a fun project to research.

-C

(property of Neopets, Inc.)
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Airship design for online game
Yu Cheng Hong web: [link]
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19-05-2010 > Final Beauty Shot (Completed)

Title: Minangkabau Chariot Airship
- High poly modeling without texture applied
- Base idea from Malaysian 'Kereta Lembu' >> [link]
- History of Minangkabau in Malaysia links >>
1) [link]
2) [link]
3) [link]

Software: Autodesk Maya 2010 (Airship Modeling) & Photoshop (Just for background composition)

First 3D model done in Autodesk Maya. Ok, I decided to do the beauty shot. I decided to show how the ship move around and the scale of the ship with the surrounding environment. In the background u can see the scale of the desert oasis with the scale of the ship.

-Progression Links:

Concept Blueprint > [link]

Work In Progress 01 > [link]

Work In Progress 02 > [link]

Work In Progress 03 > [link]

Work In Progress 04 > [link]

Work In Progress 05 > [link]

- Final links:

Final 1 > [link]

Final 2 > [link]

Final 3 > [link]

Final BeautyShot > [link]
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Steampunk
:iconhunter-hunted81:
Collection by
A reimagined vistorian airship
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This one was after my airship phase, although I was still nagged by the possibility of doing an airship in the steampunk style. This guy was that attempt. As it turns out, doing lots and lots of pipes is rather difficult, and trying to think of new details that don't ruin the overall look is very difficult. As it is, I'm pretty satisfied.
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Drawn for Chris [link] for his NaNoWriMo novel.
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This Is an aerial ship capable of carrying cargo or passenger depending on the type of extension it carry. Currently This ship carry high class passenger extension. This the black version of the airship.

Modeled with Google SketchUp 8
Model available for download at Google 3d Warehouse [link]
Rendered with Kerkythea

Background Stock By *ISOStock [link]
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Have a safe trip!
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