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Eärendil means 'Lover of the Sea' in Tolkien's invented language of Quenya. However, Tolkien borrowed the name from Old English literature. Tolkien states (Letters, 297) that the name comes from Anglo-Saxon éarendel. He was struck by its "great beauty" c. 1913, which he perceived as

entirely coherent with the normal style of A-S, but euphonic to a peculiar degree in that pleasing but not 'delectable' language.

There is a poem by Tolkien dated to 1914 entitled "The Voyage of Eärendel the Evening Star" (published in The Book of Lost Tales 2 267–269). Tolkien was also aware of the name's Germanic cognates (Old Norse AurvandillLombardic Auriwandalo), and the question why the Anglo-Saxon one rather than the Lombardic or Proto-Germanic form should be taken up in the mythology is alluded to in The Notion Club Papers. The Old Norse together with the Anglo-Saxon evidence point to an astronomical myth, the name referring to a star, or a group of stars, and the Anglo-Saxon in particular points to the morning staras the herald of the rising Sun (in Crist Christianized to refer to John the Baptist).

Tolkien was particularly inspired by the lines in the Crist written by Cynewulf:[1]

éala éarendel engla beorhtast / ofer middangeard monnum sended"Hail Earendel, brightest of angels, over Middle-earth to men sent"

which can be taken as the inspiration not only for the role of Eärendil in Tolkien's work, but also for the term Middle-earth (translating Middangeard) for the inhabitable lands (c.f. Midgard).

The first line is paralleled by Frodo Baggins' exclamation in The Two Towers (the line appears in The Return of the King in the Peter Jackson films), Aiya Eärendil Elenion Ancalima! which is Quenya, and translates to "Hail Eärendil, brightest of stars!" Frodo's exclamation was in reference to the 'Star-glass' he carried, which contained the light of Eärendil's star, the Silmaril.

Untitled by breathing2004 Untitled by breathing2004 Untitled by breathing2004 Untitled by breathing2004 

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the work i did for the contest of middleearth in Fastasy-master Group on DA.
it is the clip about the Frodo and three young Hobbits leave the Shire and meet the elves led by Gildor Inglorion.they protect the ring carrier to the forest hall,and talk about the darkness threat from the fareast~~~~~

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second mural style work about LOTR.
it is the scene about the Baggins‘s 111st birthday party,and in the pary,just after he give a short speech to thanks all the quests,he wear the Ring and dissapeared to leave the shire to travel through the mountains.

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the 3rd artwork about LOTR.
it is show the the moria mines where the fellowship of the ring going through.and from guessing the keywords to the door of Moria,and going down in darkness,and encounter the goblin army in kings hall,and finally fighting the bralog demon。

it taks a week to finsh~it is a hard progress~~~and hope you like it~

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Gates of Argonath is the gate of kingdom Gondor, the fellowship of the ring divided into two groups and lost Boromir in the battle with hands of wihte wizard.
the fate of ring only on the little hobbit.


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Tolkien breathing
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Eärendil means 'Lover of the Sea' in Tolkien's invented language of Quenya. However, Tolkien borrowed the name from Old English literature. Tolkien states (Letters, 297) that the name comes from Anglo-Saxon éarendel. He was struck by its "great beauty" c. 1913, which he perceived as

entirely coherent with the normal style of A-S, but euphonic to a peculiar degree in that pleasing but not 'delectable' language.

There is a poem by Tolkien dated to 1914 entitled "The Voyage of Eärendel the Evening Star" (published in The Book of Lost Tales 2 267–269). Tolkien was also aware of the name's Germanic cognates (Old Norse AurvandillLombardic Auriwandalo), and the question why the Anglo-Saxon one rather than the Lombardic or Proto-Germanic form should be taken up in the mythology is alluded to in The Notion Club Papers. The Old Norse together with the Anglo-Saxon evidence point to an astronomical myth, the name referring to a star, or a group of stars, and the Anglo-Saxon in particular points to the morning staras the herald of the rising Sun (in Crist Christianized to refer to John the Baptist).

Tolkien was particularly inspired by the lines in the Crist written by Cynewulf:[1]

éala éarendel engla beorhtast / ofer middangeard monnum sended"Hail Earendel, brightest of angels, over Middle-earth to men sent"

which can be taken as the inspiration not only for the role of Eärendil in Tolkien's work, but also for the term Middle-earth (translating Middangeard) for the inhabitable lands (c.f. Midgard).

The first line is paralleled by Frodo Baggins' exclamation in The Two Towers (the line appears in The Return of the King in the Peter Jackson films), Aiya Eärendil Elenion Ancalima! which is Quenya, and translates to "Hail Eärendil, brightest of stars!" Frodo's exclamation was in reference to the 'Star-glass' he carried, which contained the light of Eärendil's star, the Silmaril.

Untitled by breathing2004 Untitled by breathing2004 Untitled by breathing2004 Untitled by breathing2004 

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Thingol thought to place the Silmaril into the Necklace, and hired the Dwarves of Nogrod to do so. The Dwarven craftsmen also coveted the jewel and seeing that it was by their skill that the piece was made, saw no reason to give it up willingly. Thingol became enraged declaring that he was of the first Eldar to set off on The Great Journey and that they were guests in his realm. When he tried to take it from the Dwarves they slew him. This set off a chain of events leading to the destruction of Doriath and the scattering of its people. After Thingol's death Melian, who remained in Middle-earth by binding her spirit to that of her husband, chose to forsake her body and return to Aman as a Maia, removing the power which once protected it, leaving Doriath vulnerable to attack from without.

fate of Beren and Luthien by breathing2004
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After the catastrophe of the Fifth Battle, the Nírnaeth Arnoediad, the boy Túrin is sent to Doriath for protection from Morgoth's special enmity for the House of Húrin. Beleg becomes the mentor, steadfast friend and brother-in-arms of Túrin Turambar. The two fight together in defending the north marches of Doriath from the Orcs of Morgoth. When Túrin is accused of murder, Beleg searches out and produces at the last moment a witness who can testify to extenuating circumstances. When Túrin pridefully leaves Doriath after the affair, Beleg receives permission from Thingol to follow him into exile and is granted the sword Anglachel to help in this endeavour. Beleg long seeks Túrin. At Amon Rûdh he is captured and tortured by Túrin's men, until Túrin returns and releases him. Although Beleg beseeches Túrin to return to Doriath, where he has been pardoned and would be welcomed, Túrin still pridefully refuses and Beleg loyally chooses to stay with Túrin. Together, with Túrin wearing the Dragon-helm of Dor-lómin, they lead a band of men against the invaders of Morgoth. The land where the "Two Captains" dwell becomes known as the Land of Helm and Bow, but the small realm was destroyed two years later.

When Túrin is captured by Morgoth in a treacherous ambush, Beleg is grievously wounded. Yet with the strength of a great Elven warrior and his extraordinary healing skills, he recovers swiftly and tracks the Orcs. In the deadly land of Taur-nu-Fuin Beleg meets the elf Gwindor, recently escaped from Morgoth's thraldom, and together they rescue Túrin, with Beleg performing an heroic feat ofbowmanship, slaying numerous wolf sentinels in the dark. After they carry Túrin from the Orc-camp, while removing Túrin's bonds, Beleg accidentally cut Túrin with his sword. Túrin awakes and does not recognize Beleg in the darkness, mistaking the shape over him with a blade as an Orc. In a sudden rage of self-defence, he wrests the sword from Beleg and kills him. When he recognizes the truth of his friend's loyalty and bravery and his own fatal mistake, Túrin is so overcome with grief that he walks in a daze for weeks, being led out of danger by Gwindor. After returning to himself, Túrin takes Beleg's sword Anglachel, renaming it Gurthang ("Iron of Death"), and wields it in further battles against Morgoth's forces for the rest of his life. Years later, Túrin himself dies upon the sword Gurthang when his tragic life becomes too hard to bear, and the sword is thus avenged for the death of Beleg.[4]

After a time in grief and in honour of his friend, Túrin made and sang the Laer Cú Beleg, the Song of the Great Bow.

fate of turin continue in Turin and fall of Nargothrond by breathing2004

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After twenty-eight years of imprisonment and the death of his children, Húrin was released by Morgoth. "He had grown grim to look upon: his hair and beard were white and long, but there was a fell light in his eyes. He walked unbowed, and yet carried a great black staff; but he was girt with a sword."[2] He was brought to his old homelands in Hithlum, but the Easterlings living there at first did not recognize him and later feared him, believing he served their evil lord Morgoth. The House of Hador had been destroyed, and those who remained as slaves or outlaws held him in suspicion and fear.

Seven outlaws under Asgon joined Húrin, and together they went to the Vale of Sirion. Húrin abandoned his followers and sought the entrance to Gondolin, but the Hidden City was closed, and Turgon at first did not wish to allow him in. Húrin cried out against Turgon, thus revealing the location of Gondolin to Morgoth's spies, and then left. Only after he had left did Turgon have a change of heart and send Eagles to fetch him, but they came too late and did not find him.

Húrin continued to the forest of Brethil where his son and daughter had died, and met his wife Morwen there at their grave at Cabed-en-Aras, just before she, too, died. In anger and despair he sought out the Folk of Haleth, blaming them for the death of his wife and children, and caused a revolt that killed the last Haladin. For Hardang the Chieftain of Brethil feared and dishonoured Húrin, imprisoning and trying to kill him. Húrin's cause was defended by Manthor, and they managed to set the Folk of Brethil against Hardang and slay him. But Manthor himself was killed, and guessed the will of Húrin: "Was not this your true errand, Man of the North: to bring ruin upon us to weigh against thine own?"[2]

Húrin met up again with the outlaws, and together they went to Nargothrond, where Húrin killed the Petty-dwarf Mîm who had claimed the treasure of Glaurung, earning a curse on the gold. Húrin and his outlaws brought the treasure, including the Nauglamír, to Doriath, insulting Thingol by giving it as a fee for his 'good care' of Húrin's kin.[3] Húrin thus brought a curse on Doriath as well, eventually leading to its downfall.

Melian's kind words managed to break through to Húrin's clouded mind, and Húrin finally saw that all his deeds had only aided Morgoth. A broken man, he was rumoured to have cast himself in the sea and killed himself. That was the end of Húrin, who had been known as the "mightiest of the warriors of mortal men".

captive of Hurin by breathing2004

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Túrin Turambar came to Nargothrond and became one of its greatest warriors,  he persuaded the people to fight openly against Morgoth and bulit the bridge over the gate of Nargothrond , which eventually led to its sack by the army of the dragon Glaurung.

first part of fate of turinsong of helmet and bow by breathing2004
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Vitraux
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from Harry potter
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 Vision of Time from game WoW 
 Kairozdormu/Kairoz
Garrosh Hellscream 
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《荣耀之城》Untitled by breathing2004 Untitled by breathing2004 Untitled by breathing2004 Untitled by breathing2004  

     

    图尔从高处往下望著美丽的俏拉登平原,觉得它彷佛是摆在环抱群山中的绿宝石一般;然後他望见了远处平原中央高高的岩石山丘葛威瑞斯,以及建在其上伟大的贡多林城。那城有七个名字,所有住在中土大陆的精灵所作的歌谣中,以它的声名与荣耀最丰隆浩大。在艾克希里昂的吩咐下,大门的高塔上吹起了响亮的号角,号声在群山之间回荡;随即从远方传来清晰的回应号声,从贡多林城的白墙上响起,随著黎明在平原上回荡。    

    ————《精灵宝钻》

    精灵宝钻里的中土世界是精灵的故乡,人类刚刚觉醒的时候,精灵已经拥有了强大的文明,也深受诸神喜爱,他们有的去过西方极乐之地,接受神明的指点,学到高深知识后重返中土,有的则留在中土按他们的心意建造美丽的城市,最终留下了很多著名的城市,有群山环抱的刚多林,有藏匿在美丽安环带中的千窟之城明霞国斯,还有位于深山有天堑河流保护的多瑞亚斯,还有受到海神保护的船民之城灰港,以及人类建立的王国努曼诺尔,他们都向往着远在不死之地的西方的维诺林——双圣树故乡。然而转眼就算拥有不朽生命的精灵也想不到,这些伟大城市都毁灭殆尽,只留片片废墟空留后人唏嘘,感叹造物弄人。

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Eärendil means 'Lover of the Sea' in Tolkien's invented language of Quenya. However, Tolkien borrowed the name from Old English literature. Tolkien states (Letters, 297) that the name comes from Anglo-Saxon éarendel. He was struck by its "great beauty" c. 1913, which he perceived as

entirely coherent with the normal style of A-S, but euphonic to a peculiar degree in that pleasing but not 'delectable' language.

There is a poem by Tolkien dated to 1914 entitled "The Voyage of Eärendel the Evening Star" (published in The Book of Lost Tales 2 267–269). Tolkien was also aware of the name's Germanic cognates (Old Norse AurvandillLombardic Auriwandalo), and the question why the Anglo-Saxon one rather than the Lombardic or Proto-Germanic form should be taken up in the mythology is alluded to in The Notion Club Papers. The Old Norse together with the Anglo-Saxon evidence point to an astronomical myth, the name referring to a star, or a group of stars, and the Anglo-Saxon in particular points to the morning staras the herald of the rising Sun (in Crist Christianized to refer to John the Baptist).

Tolkien was particularly inspired by the lines in the Crist written by Cynewulf:[1]

éala éarendel engla beorhtast / ofer middangeard monnum sended"Hail Earendel, brightest of angels, over Middle-earth to men sent"

which can be taken as the inspiration not only for the role of Eärendil in Tolkien's work, but also for the term Middle-earth (translating Middangeard) for the inhabitable lands (c.f. Midgard).

The first line is paralleled by Frodo Baggins' exclamation in The Two Towers (the line appears in The Return of the King in the Peter Jackson films), Aiya Eärendil Elenion Ancalima! which is Quenya, and translates to "Hail Eärendil, brightest of stars!" Frodo's exclamation was in reference to the 'Star-glass' he carried, which contained the light of Eärendil's star, the Silmaril.

Untitled by breathing2004 Untitled by breathing2004 Untitled by breathing2004 Untitled by breathing2004 

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The Mists of Avalon is a 1983 novel by Marion Zimmer Bradley, in which she relates the Arthurian legends from the perspective of the female characters. The book follows the trajectory of Morgaine (often called Morgan le Fay in other works), a priestess fighting to save her matriarchal Celtic culture in a country wherepatriarchal Christianity threatens to destroy the pagan way of life.[1] The epic is focused on the lives of GwenhwyfarVivianeMorgauseIgraine and other women who are often marginalized in Arthurian retellings. King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table are supporting rather than main characters.

The Mists of Avalon is in stark contrast to most other retellings of the Arthurian tales, which consistently cast Morgan le Fay as a distant, one-dimensional evil sorceress, with little or no explanation given for her antagonism to the Round Table. In this case Morgaine is presented as a woman with unique gifts and responsibilities at a time of enormous political and spiritual upheaval who is called upon to defend her indigenous matriarchal heritage against impossible odds.The Mists of Avalon stands as a watershed for feminist interpretation of male-centered myth by articulating women's experiences at times of great change and shifts in gender-power. The typical battles, quests, and feuds of King Arthur's reign act as secondary elements to the women's lives.

The story is told in four large parts: Book One: Mistress of MagicBook Two: The High QueenBook Three: The King Stag, and Book Four: The Prisoner in the Oak. The novel was a best-seller upon its publication and remains popular to this day. Bradley and Diana L. Paxson later expanded the book into the Avalon series.

this is the chinese version will published in 2015 in china soon

cover of book 1
cover for The Mists of Avalon book 1 by breathing2004

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    'Listen! They are coming this way,' said Frodo. 'We have only to wait.' The singing drew nearer. One clear voice rose now above the others. It was singing in the fair elven-tongue, of which Frodo knew only a little, and the others knew nothing. Yet the sound blending with the melody seemed to shape itself in their thought into words which they only partly understood. This was the song as Frodo heard it:

    Snow-white! Snow-white! O Lady clear!

    O Queen beyond the Western Seas!

    O Light to us that wander here

    Amid the world of woven trees!

    Gilthoniel! O Elbereth!

    Clear are thy eyes and bright thy breath!

    Snow-white! Snow-white! We sing to thee

    In a far land beyond the Sea.

    O stars that in the Sunless Year

    With shining hand by her were sawn,

    In windy fields now bright and clear

    We see your silver blossom blown!

    O Elbereth! Gilthoniel!

    We still remember, we who dwell

    In this far land beneath the trees,

    Thy starlight on the Western Seas.

    The song ended. 'These are High Elves! They spoke the name of Elbereth!' said Frodo in amazement, 'Few of that fairest folk are ever seen in the Shire. Not many now remain in Middle-earth, east of the Great Sea. This is indeed a strange chance!'

-------------from chapter III<three is company>

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Tolkien:Lord of the middle earth
English writer, scholar and philologist, Tolkien's father was a bank manager in South Africa. When his father died in 1896 his mother took him and his younger brother to his father's native village of Sarehole, near Birmingham, England. The landscapes and Nordic mythology of the Midlands may have been the source for Tolkien's fertile imagination to... See full bio »
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The son of Tuor and Idril, daughter of Turgon, Eärendil was raised in Gondolin. When Eärendil was seven years old, he escaped the sacking of Gondolin with his parents, living afterwards in Arvernien by the mouth of Sirion. Eärendil later became the leader of the people who lived there, and married Elwing, daughter of Dior the son of Beren and Lúthien. They had two sons, Elrond and Elros.

With the aid of Círdan the Shipwright, Eärendil built a ship, Vingilótë (or Vingilot), which is Quenya for "foam-flower". He sailed this often around the seas west of Middle-earth, leaving his wife behind in Arvernien. At this time Elwing had in her possession the Silmaril that Beren had wrested from Morgoth. News of this came to the sons of Fëanor who were still living, and they attacked the people living in Arvernien, and killed most of them. Elwing, rather than be captured, threw herself with the Silmaril into the sea. The Silmaril was not lost, however. According to The Silmarillion:

For Ulmo bore up Elwing out of the waves, and he gave her the likeness of a great white bird, and upon her breast there shone as a star the Silmaril, as she flew over the water to seek Eärendil her beloved. On a time of night Eärendil at the helm of his ship saw her come towards him, as a white cloud exceeding swift beneath the moon, as a star over the sea moving in strange courses, a pale flame on wings of storm. And it is sung that she fell from the air upon the timbers of Vingilot, in a swoon, nigh unto death for the urgency of her speed, and Eärendil took her to his bosom; but in the morning with marvelling eyes he beheld his wife in her own form beside him with her hair upon his face, and she slept.

Hearing of the tragedy that had befallen in Arvernien, Eärendil then sought after Valinor, aboard the Vingilot with Aerandir, Erellont, and Falathar, and he and Elwing found their way there at last. Eärendil thus became the first of all mortals to set foot in Valinor. Eärendil then went before the Valar, and asked them for aid for Men and Elves in Middle-earth, to fight against Morgoth; the Valar accepted his plea.

Because Eärendil had undertaken this errand on behalf of Men and Elves, and not for his own sake, Manwë forbore to deal out the punishment of death that was due. Also, because both Eärendil and Elwing were descended from a union of Elves and Men, Manwë granted to them and their sons the gift to choose to which race they would be joined (a gift that was further passed to the children of Elrond, who became known as the Half-elven). Elwing chose to be one of the Elves. Eärendil would have rather been one of the Men; however, for the sake of his wife, he chose to be one of the Elves. The Silmarillionsays this:

Now when first Vingilot was set to sail in the seas of heaven, it rose unlooked for, glittering and bright; and the people of Middle-earth beheld it from afar and wondered, and they took it for a sign, and called it Gil-Estel, the Star of High Hope.

The Valar, having listened to Eärendil's plea, went with a mighty host to Middle-earth, and overthrew Morgoth. Eärendil took part in the battle, riding on Vingilot beside Thorondor and the Eagles. He struck down the great dragon Ancalagon and cast him down onto Thangorodrim, the event which, along with the sheer devastation caused by the War of Wrath, led to the Ruin of Beleriand. However, right before the Dagor Dagorath, the Last Battle, Morgoth will escape out the Door of Night to destroy Arda. It is implied Eärendil shall participate in that, alongside every creature in Middle-earth, good and evil.

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"Now the streets of Gondolin were paved with stone and wide, kerbed with marble, and fair houses and courts amid gardens of bright flowers were set about the ways, and many towers of great slenderness and beauty builded of white marble and carved most marvelously rose to the heaven. Squares there were lit with fountains and the home of birds that sang amid the branches of their aged trees, but of all these the greatest was that place where stood the King's palace, and the tower thereof was the loftiest in the city, and the fountains that played before the doors shot twenty fathoms and seven in the air and fell in a singing rain of crystal; therein did the sun glitter splendidly by day, and the moon most magically shimmered by night. The birds that dwelt there were of the whiteness of snow and their voices sweeter than a lullaby of music.

 the Vala Ulmo, the Lord of Waters, revealed the location of the Vale of Tumladen to the Noldorin Lord Turgon in a dream around the year FA 50. Under this divine guidance, Turgon travelled from his kingdom in Nevrast and found the vale in FA 53. Within the Echoriath just west of Dorthonion and east of the River Sirion, lay a round level plain with sheer walls on all sides and a ravine and tunnel leading out to the southwest known as the Hidden Way. In the middle of the vale there was a steep hill which was calledAmon Gwareth. There Turgon decided to found a great city that would be protected by the mountains and hidden from the Dark Lord Morgoth.

For nearly seventy-five years, Turgon and his people built Gondolin in secret. After it was completed in FA 116, he took with him to dwell in the hidden city his entire people in Nevrast — almost a third of the Ñoldor — as well as nearly three quarters of the northern Sindar. The city stood for nearly 400 years until it was betrayed to Morgoth by Maeglin, Turgon's nephew, and sacked by the army of Morgoth the Dark Lord.[2]




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Lord of the Rings
:iconaldomann:
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Eärendil means 'Lover of the Sea' in Tolkien's invented language of Quenya. However, Tolkien borrowed the name from Old English literature. Tolkien states (Letters, 297) that the name comes from Anglo-Saxon éarendel. He was struck by its "great beauty" c. 1913, which he perceived as

entirely coherent with the normal style of A-S, but euphonic to a peculiar degree in that pleasing but not 'delectable' language.

There is a poem by Tolkien dated to 1914 entitled "The Voyage of Eärendel the Evening Star" (published in The Book of Lost Tales 2 267–269). Tolkien was also aware of the name's Germanic cognates (Old Norse AurvandillLombardic Auriwandalo), and the question why the Anglo-Saxon one rather than the Lombardic or Proto-Germanic form should be taken up in the mythology is alluded to in The Notion Club Papers. The Old Norse together with the Anglo-Saxon evidence point to an astronomical myth, the name referring to a star, or a group of stars, and the Anglo-Saxon in particular points to the morning staras the herald of the rising Sun (in Crist Christianized to refer to John the Baptist).

Tolkien was particularly inspired by the lines in the Crist written by Cynewulf:[1]

éala éarendel engla beorhtast / ofer middangeard monnum sended"Hail Earendel, brightest of angels, over Middle-earth to men sent"

which can be taken as the inspiration not only for the role of Eärendil in Tolkien's work, but also for the term Middle-earth (translating Middangeard) for the inhabitable lands (c.f. Midgard).

The first line is paralleled by Frodo Baggins' exclamation in The Two Towers (the line appears in The Return of the King in the Peter Jackson films), Aiya Eärendil Elenion Ancalima! which is Quenya, and translates to "Hail Eärendil, brightest of stars!" Frodo's exclamation was in reference to the 'Star-glass' he carried, which contained the light of Eärendil's star, the Silmaril.

Untitled by breathing2004 Untitled by breathing2004 Untitled by breathing2004 Untitled by breathing2004 

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Allatar and Pallando (no doubt known by different names at this point) meet for a chai, somewhere in the vast expanses of the East.

The blue wizards fascinate me. They are perhaps the two most significant absentees of the events of the third age in the west in middle-earth, having ventured off east and never returning; theirs was the only (remarked upon) excursion of the ainur into the east, and in them and their story (what precious little we have of it) as with little details like the oliphants or the "apes of the southern juggles," middle-earth is expanded out beyond being merely some pseudo-european mythical world and comes to feel more like a fictionalized version of, well, the whole world. Tolkien changed his mind a few times about the blue wizards; his original concept, presented in he appendices to the Lord of the Rings and in the Unfinished Tales, placed them as the last two members of the istari, who went far out into the east of middle-earth and never returned, founding cults and magic traditions, but in this early concept, generally speaking, the blue wizards (like radaghast and saruman) are supposed to have failed in their larger mission (to inspire the people of middle earth to action and contest the rise of Sauron) becoming terminally side-tracked in their journeys. His later conception of the duo was less critical, placing their arrival in middle-earth midway through the second age, several thousand years before Saruman Gandalf and Radaghast, and in this version they are remarked to have had a great impact as missionaries to the east, successfully combating the influence of evil and instilling in the peoples and cultures of the far off eastern lands some much needed knowledge of the Powers in the True West.

personally I can't make up my mind as to which concept I like better. I definitely prefer the notion of the five Istari coming to middle-earth as a unit, and the concept of maiar spirits being sent to middle-earth to do a particular job and instead becoming lost in the vastness of the world is really interesting to me, much more interesting than them simply carrying out the rather narrow task of missionary work, but at the same time it's nice to think that the Valar would give SOME thought to the children of men outside of the edain (the case has been made elsewhere - and I think it's a sound one - that it's just a little douchey of both the elves and the Valar to hold it against the "evil" men of the south and east that they came to worship the only one of the divine powers who actually bothered to show himself to them) and if the blue wizards were sent to middle-earth with stated purpose of going east, it is reasonable to believe that through their influence the peoples and cultures out there gained some awareness of the creator and the divine truth of the world they live in.

It was suggested to me that the Blue Wizards should look ethnically like the people of the farther regions of middle-earth who they would be interacting with, which seems especially fitting if they were indeed MEANT to go east (and provided a great opportunity, artistically, to draw on "wizards" from non-european cultures). I was going for a very central-asian feel to their rendezvous setting, and also to have them look like they've been living apart, among different peoples in different lands (the "East" always reffered to as one unified, villainous entity by westerners, is infact far bigger and more diverse than the west). it was a matter of some debate for me whether or not they should still retain their blue robes (leave it to the valar to be tone-deaf enough to clothe their two emmisarries heading out farthest into hostile territory in the rarest and therefore most conspicuous dye color, because it's "the color of the sea") but finally i thought they should retain their colors, reworked and re-tailored as cultural stylings dictate, and finally hidden (like gandalf's white) under less attention-grabbing garments.  imagine the two meeting for the first time in many, many years, possibly to discuss the reemergence of sauron, (or maybe just to catch up over a nice bowl of hashish)

this was a really fun picture to do and to think about. maybe there's an inherent fondness for those tantalizing little side characters we only get to hear a word or two about, but I've got to love the blue wizards for going out east and becoming immersed. i see them as the sort of rebellious ones; they came to do their mission but got kind of floored by how huge and awe inspiring the world is, and came to develop a personal affinity for the under-cared-for people of the east, as both inherently good, empathetic children of illuvatar, and as a people under constant pressure from the forces of evil. I like to think that in attempting to undo things like dragon-worship and curb the spread of ruthless mordor-supported warlords, they had alot of work cut out for them - not the least of which being relentlessly hunted by servants of sauron - and came in time to relish the task (saruman is of course rebellious as well, but more like the ivy league educated success case who crashes and burns in his mid thirties, they "failed in different ways" as tolkien puts it)
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Dain Ironfoot, Cousin to the King of Dwarves, lord of the Iron Hills, next in line (behind Fili and Kili) to the throne under the Lonely Mountain and one all around stern looking motherfucker. I always liked dain in the book because he was really the only named dwarf in the hobbit who didn't have to share in the various embarrassing moments which thorin and co. suffered. he comes off like a visitor from an altogether more serious story.
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Featuring characters from JRR Tolkien's The Hobbit: of all the dwarves, Balin is the most "fatherly" toward Bilbo. i imagined them here on the eve of the battle of five armies.
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The King under the Mountain. One of my concept illustrations for The Hobbit

see also
Thorin son of Thrain [link]
Dain Ironfoot [link]
Balin [link]
Royal Cousins [link]
dwarves [link]
more dwarves [link]
(dwarf sketch) [link]
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Breathing2004
:iconwager:
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"Since the death of the Great Goblin, the goblins' hatred of dwarves had been rekindled to fury."The HobbitThe Clouds Burst

The Battle of the Five Armies was a battle waged between the Goblins and the Wargs against Men of Dale, Elves,Dwarves and Eagles on and near the Lonely Mountain

The three commanders agreed that the Goblins and Wargs were the enemies of all, and previous grievances between them were put on hold in face of the greater threat. They arranged their forces on the two spurs of the Mountain that lined the valley leading to the now-sealed off great gate; the only entrance to the Mountain. The Dwarves and Lake-men formed up on one spur and the Elves on the other, while a light rear-guard lined across the mouth of the valley to lure the Goblins between the two, and thus destroy them. Bilbo Baggins, while invisible due to the Ring, tried to sit out the battle on the spur held by the Elves.

Soon the Goblins and Wargs arrived (and now four armies were on the field), and at first the plan worked: they were lured into the choke point and took heavy losses. However, due to their superior numbers, the allied Free Folk did not hold the advantage long. The second wave was even worse than the first, and now many Goblins scaled the mountain from the opposite side, and began to attack the arrayed forces from above and behind, as the main wave pressed forward. The battle raged across the Mountain, and then a great noise was heard: Thorin and his twelve Dwarf companions inside the mountain had thrown down the stone wall they had erected across the mouth of the gates, killing many Goblins. Thorin and Company then charged out to join the battle, covered from head to toe in the finest armour and weapons contained in the treasure hoard of Erebor. Thorin advanced through the Goblins ranks all the way up to the gigantic Goblins that formed the Bodyguard of Bolg, whom he could not get past. The battle degenerated into a chaotic close quarters melee, no quarter asked or given.

As the battle was turning fully against the Free Folk, a number of Giant Eagles of the Misty Mountains arrived (the fifth army), led by GwaihirLord of the Eagles. Bilbo was the first to spot their entrance on the scene and began shouting that "the Eagles are coming!", a shout that was then continued among the other troops of the Free Folk. At this point Bilbo was knocked in the head by a large stone thrown by a Goblin from above on the Mountain, and he passed out. With the support of the Giant Eagles, the battle turned back against the Goblins. Then Beorn himself arrived at the battle, apparently having heard news that a large army of Goblins was on the move. This time he did not appear in his former shape of a giant Man, but had changed his skin to that of a gigantic bear. Beorn drove through the Goblin lines, but paused to carry the wounded Thorin out of the battle. Beorn then returned to the battle with even greater wrath and smashed the ranks of the Bodyguard of Bolg, ultimately killing Bolg himself. The Goblins eventually panicked and scattered, to be picked off by hunting forces from the victors later; many of the Goblin survivors died in the Mirkwood forest.

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Beren was the last survivor of a group of Men led by his father Barahir that had still resisted Morgoth, the Dark Enemy, after the Battle of Sudden Flame, in which Morgoth had conquered much of northern Middle-earth. After the defeat of his companions he fled from peril into the elvish realm Doriath. There he met Lúthien, the only daughter of King Thingol and Melian the Maia, as she was dancing and singing in a glade. Seeing the beautiful Elf, Beren fell in love with her, for she was the fairest of all Elves and Men. She later fell in love with him as well, when he, moved by her beauty and enchanting voice, gave her the nickname "Nightingale." As Thingol disliked Beren and regarded him as being unworthy of his daughter, he set a seemingly impossible task on Beren that he had to achieve before he could marry Lúthien. Thingol asked Beren to bring him one of the Silmarils, the three hallowed jewels made by Fëanor, which Morgoth had stolen from the Elves.
Beren left Doriath and set out on his quest to Angband, the enemy’s fortress. Although Thingol tried to prevent it, Lúthien later followed him. On his journey to the enemy’s land Beren reached Nargothrond, an Elvish stronghold, and was joined by ten warriors under the lead of King Finrod, who had sworn an oath of friendship to Beren's father. Although Fëanor’s sons, Celegorm and Curufin, warned them not to take the Silmaril that they considered their own, the company was determined to accompany Beren. On their way to Angband they were seized by the servants of Sauron, despite the best efforts of Finrod to maintain their guise as Orcs, and imprisoned in Tol-in-Gaurhoth. One by one they were killed by a werewolf until only Beren and Finrod remained. When the wolf went for Beren, Finrod broke his chains and wrestled with it such fierceness that they both died.
When she was following Beren, Lúthien was captured and brought to Nargothrond by Celegorm and Curufin. Aided by Huan, Celegorm’s hound (which according to prophecy could only be defeated by the greatest werewolf ever), she was able to flee. With his aid she came to Sauron’s fortress where Huan defeated the werewolves of the Enemy, Draugluin, and Sauron himself in wolf-form. Then they freed the prisoners, among them Beren.
Beren wanted to try his task once more alone, but Lúthien insisted on coming with him. Through magic they took the shapes of the bat Thuringwethil and the wolf Draugluin that Huan had killed. Thereby they were able to enter the enemy’s land and at last came to Angband and before Morgoth’s throne. There Lúthien sang a magical song which made the Dark Lord fall asleep; then Beren cut a Silmaril from Morgoth’s crown. As he tried to cut out the others, his knife broke and a shard glanced off Morgoth's face, awakening him. As they attempted to leave, the gate was barred by Carcharoth, a giant werewolf, who was bred as an opponent to Huan. He bit off and swallowed Beren’s hand, in which Beren was holding the Silmaril.[2] Carcharoth was burned by the pure light of the Silmaril and ran off madly.
Beren and Lúthien returned to Doriath, where they told of their deeds and thereby softened Thingol’s heart. He accepted the marriage of his daughter and the mortal Man, although Beren’s task had not been fulfilled. Beren and Huan participated in the hunt for Carcharoth, who in his madness had come into Doriath and caused much destruction there. Both of them were killed by the wolf, but Carcharoth was also slain. Before he died, Beren handed the Silmaril, which was recovered from Carcharoth's belly, to Thingol.
Grieving for Beren, Lúthien also died, and came to the halls of Mandos. There she sang of her ill fate, that she would never again see Beren, who as a mortal Man had passed out of the world. Thereby Mandos was moved to pity. He restored Beren and Lúthien to life and granted mortality to the Elf. Lúthien left her home and her parents and went to Ossiriand with Beren. There they dwelt for the rest of their lives, and both eventually died the death of mortal Men.

Nauglamir by breathing2004
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Ent

more art about LOTR :
fifteen birds in the trees by breathing2004Bilbo Baggins in bagend by breathing2004Feanor and Silmarils by breathing2004Narsilion by breathing2004progress of Ent the shepherd of forest by breathing2004eight legs nightmare by breathing2004:thumb364273777::thumb363077730::thumb360187749::thumb359088094::thumb357822659::thumb356156478::thumb353198426::thumb348278170::thumb348024202::thumb344290706::thumb335476094::thumb333000165::thumb328677422::thumb327462140::thumb324611190::thumb324564146::thumb298350523::thumb211940262::thumb209201679:
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"In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit. Not a nasty, dirty, wet hole, filled with the ends of worms and an oozy smell, nor yet a dry, bare, sandy hole with nothing in it to sit down on or to eat: it was a hobbit-hole, and that means comfort.
It had a perfectly round door like a porthole, painted green, with a shiny yellow brass knob in the exact middle. The door opened on to a tube-shaped hall like a tunnel: a very comfortable tunnel without smoke, with panelled walls, and floors tiled and carpeted, provided with polished chairs, and lots and lots of pegs for hats and coats – the hobbit was fond of visitors. The tunnel wound on and on, going fairly but not quite straight into the side of the hill – The Hill, as all the people for many miles round called it – and many little round doors opened out of it, first on one side and then on another. No going upstairs for the hobbit: bedrooms, bathrooms, cellars, pantries (lots of these), wardrobes (he had whole rooms devoted to clothes), kitchens, dining-rooms, all were on the same floor, and indeed on the same passage. The best rooms were all on the left-hand side (going in), for these were the only ones to have windows, deep-set round windows looking over his garden, and meadows beyond, sloping down to the river.
- J. R. R. Tolkien, The Hobbit

more art about LOTR :
:thumb360187749::thumb359088094::thumb357822659::thumb356156478::thumb353198426::thumb348278170::thumb348024202::thumb344290706::thumb335476094::thumb333000165::thumb328677422::thumb327462140::thumb324611190::thumb324564146::thumb298350523::thumb211940262::thumb209201679:
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“in the greatest of his achievements, captured the light of the Two Trees to make the three Silmarils, also called the Great Jewels, though they were not mere glittering stones, they were alive, imperishable, and sacred”
"Varda hallowed the Silmarils so that thereafter no mortal flesh, nor hands unclean, nor anything of evil will might touch them, but it was scorched and withered."

more art about LOTR :
:thumb359088094::thumb357822659::thumb356156478::thumb353198426::thumb348278170::thumb348024202::thumb344290706::thumb335476094::thumb333000165::thumb328677422::thumb327462140::thumb324611190::thumb324564146::thumb298350523::thumb211940262::thumb209201679:
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On Tumblr Facebook
I should probably make a separate folder for Thranduil by now ;)
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This commission was so much fun - I love The Hobbit and King Thranduil (Of course also Lord of the Rings)!
Which character do you love most?
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L2R Legolas, Thranduil, Tauriel
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:iconeowyner:
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the work i did for the contest of middleearth in Fastasy-master Group on DA.
it is the clip about the Frodo and three young Hobbits leave the Shire and meet the elves led by Gildor Inglorion.they protect the ring carrier to the forest hall,and talk about the darkness threat from the fareast~~~~~

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second mural style work about LOTR.
it is the scene about the Baggins‘s 111st birthday party,and in the pary,just after he give a short speech to thanks all the quests,he wear the Ring and dissapeared to leave the shire to travel through the mountains.

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As the King of Rohan.Théoden was growing weak with age, and was largely controlled by his chief advisor Gríma, who was secretly in the employ of the corrupt wizard Saruman. In Unfinished Tales, it is implied that Gríma was accelerating the king's decline with "subtle poisons". As Théoden sat powerless, Rohan was troubled by Orcs and Dunlendings, who operated under the will of Saruman, ruling from Isengard.

When his son Théodred was mortally wounded at a battle at the Fords of Isen, Théoden's nephew Éomer became his heir. However, Éomer was out of favour with Wormtongue, who eventually had him arrested.

When Gandalf the White and Aragorn appeared before him , Théoden initially rebuffed the wizard's advice to ride out against Saruman. When Gandalf revealed Wormtongue for what he was, however, Théoden returned to his senses. He restored his nephew, took up his sword Herugrim, and in spite of his age, led the Riders of Rohan into the Battle of the Hornburg. After this he became known as Théoden Ednew, the Renewed.
I think my next work will be in Hornburg.haha

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As told in "The Tale of Aragorn and Arwen", Aragorn in his twentieth year met Arwen for the first time in Rivendell, where he lived under Elrond's protection. Arwen, then over 2700 years old, had recently returned to her father's home after living for a while with her grandmother Lady Galadriel in Lórien. Aragorn fell in love with Arwen at first sight. Some thirty years later, the two were reunited in Lórien. Arwen reciprocated Aragorn's love, and on the mound of Cerin Amroth they committed themselves to marry one another.
After the War of the Ring, Aragorn became king of Arnor and Gondor. Arwen arrived at Minas Tirith, and they were married.
Her few appearances in the book suggest that Arwen is a minor character in The Lord of the Rings; but she serves as inspiration and motivation for Aragorn, who, as Elrond stipulated, must become King of both Arnor and Gondor before he could wed her.
The Tale of Aragorn and Arwen relates that Arwen had a son, Eldarion, and at least two unnamed daughters by Aragorn. In F.A. 121, one year after Aragorn's death, at the age of 2901 she gave up her life at Cerin Amroth.

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Featured
:iconmagic976:
Collection by
the work i did for the contest of middleearth in Fastasy-master Group on DA.
it is the clip about the Frodo and three young Hobbits leave the Shire and meet the elves led by Gildor Inglorion.they protect the ring carrier to the forest hall,and talk about the darkness threat from the fareast~~~~~

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second mural style work about LOTR.
it is the scene about the Baggins‘s 111st birthday party,and in the pary,just after he give a short speech to thanks all the quests,he wear the Ring and dissapeared to leave the shire to travel through the mountains.

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the 3rd artwork about LOTR.
it is show the the moria mines where the fellowship of the ring going through.and from guessing the keywords to the door of Moria,and going down in darkness,and encounter the goblin army in kings hall,and finally fighting the bralog demon。

it taks a week to finsh~it is a hard progress~~~and hope you like it~

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Gates of Argonath is the gate of kingdom Gondor, the fellowship of the ring divided into two groups and lost Boromir in the battle with hands of wihte wizard.
the fate of ring only on the little hobbit.


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Galadriel welcomed the Fellowship to Lothlórien after their escape from Moria. When she met the Fellowship in her tree dwelling at Caras Galadhon, she gave each member a searching look, testing their resolve — though Boromir interpreted this test as a temptation. She was in turn tested when Frodo Baggins offered to place the Ring in her keeping. Knowing that its corrupting influence would make her "great and terrible", and recalling the ambitions that had once brought her to Middle-earth, she refused the Ring. She accepted that her own ring's power would fail and that her people would diminish and fade with the One Ring's destruction, and that her only escape from the fading of the Elves and the dominion of Men was to return at last to Valinor. There is the suggestion in the novel, backed up by other writings,[5] that in acknowledgement of this renunciation of power her personal ban from Valinor was lifted and she was finally given leave to return over the sea.

and the elves on the bottom of the pic is some part works did for :~bastler:
update a new print-sell version

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A song of ice and fire (GRR Martin) fanart.

A stained glass window of the Seven, the most common religion in Westeros.

I took real characters for most of the deities.

The Smith - Gendry
The Crone - Uhhh I thought of Old Nan, but actually she's more of a random old Lady
The Maiden - Sansa (with Lady and a little bird ;) )
The Warrior - Jaime Lannister. The background is to be similar to the Red Grassfields (battle between the Blackfyre pretenders and the Targ loyalists)
The Mother - Gilly. That's a gillyflower in the front and she's wearing Sam's cloak :love:
The Father - Eddard Stark
The Stranger - Nobody :p
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A friend on LJ suggested that my windows were nice enough to send them to GRRM to see if he wants to include it on his webpage fanart gallery.
So I don't think he has time to look at like lots of pics, I pasted the windows all together. And besides, don't we rather have GRRM writing on ADWD instead of looking at fanart? ;)

Apparently people say it's pretty enough to have it in the gallery so well.

Original pics are here:
Martell, Targaryen, Greyjoy [link]
Tully, Stark, Arryn [link]
Baratheon, Lannister, Tyrell [link]
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As told in "The Tale of Aragorn and Arwen", Aragorn in his twentieth year met Arwen for the first time in Rivendell, where he lived under Elrond's protection. Arwen, then over 2700 years old, had recently returned to her father's home after living for a while with her grandmother Lady Galadriel in Lórien. Aragorn fell in love with Arwen at first sight. Some thirty years later, the two were reunited in Lórien. Arwen reciprocated Aragorn's love, and on the mound of Cerin Amroth they committed themselves to marry one another.
After the War of the Ring, Aragorn became king of Arnor and Gondor. Arwen arrived at Minas Tirith, and they were married.
Her few appearances in the book suggest that Arwen is a minor character in The Lord of the Rings; but she serves as inspiration and motivation for Aragorn, who, as Elrond stipulated, must become King of both Arnor and Gondor before he could wed her.
The Tale of Aragorn and Arwen relates that Arwen had a son, Eldarion, and at least two unnamed daughters by Aragorn. In F.A. 121, one year after Aragorn's death, at the age of 2901 she gave up her life at Cerin Amroth.

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During the Battle of the Pelennor Fields, the Witch-king himself was slain by Éowyn and Merry: Merry's surreptitious stroke with an enchanted Barrow-blade drove the Witch-king to his knees, allowing Éowyn, the niece of Théoden, to drive her sword between his crown and mantle. Thus was the Witch-king destroyed by a woman and a Hobbit, fulfilling the prophecy that "not by the hand of man will he fall".Both weapons that pierced him disintegrated, and both assailants were stricken with the Black Breath.

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