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Eärendil means 'Lover of the Sea' in Tolkien's invented language of Quenya. However, Tolkien borrowed the name from Old English literature. Tolkien states (Letters, 297) that the name comes from Anglo-Saxon éarendel. He was struck by its "great beauty" c. 1913, which he perceived as

entirely coherent with the normal style of A-S, but euphonic to a peculiar degree in that pleasing but not 'delectable' language.

There is a poem by Tolkien dated to 1914 entitled "The Voyage of Eärendel the Evening Star" (published in The Book of Lost Tales 2 267–269). Tolkien was also aware of the name's Germanic cognates (Old Norse AurvandillLombardic Auriwandalo), and the question why the Anglo-Saxon one rather than the Lombardic or Proto-Germanic form should be taken up in the mythology is alluded to in The Notion Club Papers. The Old Norse together with the Anglo-Saxon evidence point to an astronomical myth, the name referring to a star, or a group of stars, and the Anglo-Saxon in particular points to the morning staras the herald of the rising Sun (in Crist Christianized to refer to John the Baptist).

Tolkien was particularly inspired by the lines in the Crist written by Cynewulf:[1]

éala éarendel engla beorhtast / ofer middangeard monnum sended"Hail Earendel, brightest of angels, over Middle-earth to men sent"

which can be taken as the inspiration not only for the role of Eärendil in Tolkien's work, but also for the term Middle-earth (translating Middangeard) for the inhabitable lands (c.f. Midgard).

The first line is paralleled by Frodo Baggins' exclamation in The Two Towers (the line appears in The Return of the King in the Peter Jackson films), Aiya Eärendil Elenion Ancalima! which is Quenya, and translates to "Hail Eärendil, brightest of stars!" Frodo's exclamation was in reference to the 'Star-glass' he carried, which contained the light of Eärendil's star, the Silmaril.

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the work i did for the contest of middleearth in Fastasy-master Group on DA.
it is the clip about the Frodo and three young Hobbits leave the Shire and meet the elves led by Gildor Inglorion.they protect the ring carrier to the forest hall,and talk about the darkness threat from the fareast~~~~~

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second mural style work about LOTR.
it is the scene about the Baggins‘s 111st birthday party,and in the pary,just after he give a short speech to thanks all the quests,he wear the Ring and dissapeared to leave the shire to travel through the mountains.

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the 3rd artwork about LOTR.
it is show the the moria mines where the fellowship of the ring going through.and from guessing the keywords to the door of Moria,and going down in darkness,and encounter the goblin army in kings hall,and finally fighting the bralog demon。

it taks a week to finsh~it is a hard progress~~~and hope you like it~

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Gates of Argonath is the gate of kingdom Gondor, the fellowship of the ring divided into two groups and lost Boromir in the battle with hands of wihte wizard.
the fate of ring only on the little hobbit.


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Eärendil means 'Lover of the Sea' in Tolkien's invented language of Quenya. However, Tolkien borrowed the name from Old English literature. Tolkien states (Letters, 297) that the name comes from Anglo-Saxon éarendel. He was struck by its "great beauty" c. 1913, which he perceived as

entirely coherent with the normal style of A-S, but euphonic to a peculiar degree in that pleasing but not 'delectable' language.

There is a poem by Tolkien dated to 1914 entitled "The Voyage of Eärendel the Evening Star" (published in The Book of Lost Tales 2 267–269). Tolkien was also aware of the name's Germanic cognates (Old Norse AurvandillLombardic Auriwandalo), and the question why the Anglo-Saxon one rather than the Lombardic or Proto-Germanic form should be taken up in the mythology is alluded to in The Notion Club Papers. The Old Norse together with the Anglo-Saxon evidence point to an astronomical myth, the name referring to a star, or a group of stars, and the Anglo-Saxon in particular points to the morning staras the herald of the rising Sun (in Crist Christianized to refer to John the Baptist).

Tolkien was particularly inspired by the lines in the Crist written by Cynewulf:[1]

éala éarendel engla beorhtast / ofer middangeard monnum sended"Hail Earendel, brightest of angels, over Middle-earth to men sent"

which can be taken as the inspiration not only for the role of Eärendil in Tolkien's work, but also for the term Middle-earth (translating Middangeard) for the inhabitable lands (c.f. Midgard).

The first line is paralleled by Frodo Baggins' exclamation in The Two Towers (the line appears in The Return of the King in the Peter Jackson films), Aiya Eärendil Elenion Ancalima! which is Quenya, and translates to "Hail Eärendil, brightest of stars!" Frodo's exclamation was in reference to the 'Star-glass' he carried, which contained the light of Eärendil's star, the Silmaril.

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Thingol thought to place the Silmaril into the Necklace, and hired the Dwarves of Nogrod to do so. The Dwarven craftsmen also coveted the jewel and seeing that it was by their skill that the piece was made, saw no reason to give it up willingly. Thingol became enraged declaring that he was of the first Eldar to set off on The Great Journey and that they were guests in his realm. When he tried to take it from the Dwarves they slew him. This set off a chain of events leading to the destruction of Doriath and the scattering of its people. After Thingol's death Melian, who remained in Middle-earth by binding her spirit to that of her husband, chose to forsake her body and return to Aman as a Maia, removing the power which once protected it, leaving Doriath vulnerable to attack from without.

fate of Beren and Luthien by breathing2004
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After the catastrophe of the Fifth Battle, the Nírnaeth Arnoediad, the boy Túrin is sent to Doriath for protection from Morgoth's special enmity for the House of Húrin. Beleg becomes the mentor, steadfast friend and brother-in-arms of Túrin Turambar. The two fight together in defending the north marches of Doriath from the Orcs of Morgoth. When Túrin is accused of murder, Beleg searches out and produces at the last moment a witness who can testify to extenuating circumstances. When Túrin pridefully leaves Doriath after the affair, Beleg receives permission from Thingol to follow him into exile and is granted the sword Anglachel to help in this endeavour. Beleg long seeks Túrin. At Amon Rûdh he is captured and tortured by Túrin's men, until Túrin returns and releases him. Although Beleg beseeches Túrin to return to Doriath, where he has been pardoned and would be welcomed, Túrin still pridefully refuses and Beleg loyally chooses to stay with Túrin. Together, with Túrin wearing the Dragon-helm of Dor-lómin, they lead a band of men against the invaders of Morgoth. The land where the "Two Captains" dwell becomes known as the Land of Helm and Bow, but the small realm was destroyed two years later.

When Túrin is captured by Morgoth in a treacherous ambush, Beleg is grievously wounded. Yet with the strength of a great Elven warrior and his extraordinary healing skills, he recovers swiftly and tracks the Orcs. In the deadly land of Taur-nu-Fuin Beleg meets the elf Gwindor, recently escaped from Morgoth's thraldom, and together they rescue Túrin, with Beleg performing an heroic feat ofbowmanship, slaying numerous wolf sentinels in the dark. After they carry Túrin from the Orc-camp, while removing Túrin's bonds, Beleg accidentally cut Túrin with his sword. Túrin awakes and does not recognize Beleg in the darkness, mistaking the shape over him with a blade as an Orc. In a sudden rage of self-defence, he wrests the sword from Beleg and kills him. When he recognizes the truth of his friend's loyalty and bravery and his own fatal mistake, Túrin is so overcome with grief that he walks in a daze for weeks, being led out of danger by Gwindor. After returning to himself, Túrin takes Beleg's sword Anglachel, renaming it Gurthang ("Iron of Death"), and wields it in further battles against Morgoth's forces for the rest of his life. Years later, Túrin himself dies upon the sword Gurthang when his tragic life becomes too hard to bear, and the sword is thus avenged for the death of Beleg.[4]

After a time in grief and in honour of his friend, Túrin made and sang the Laer Cú Beleg, the Song of the Great Bow.

fate of turin continue in Turin and fall of Nargothrond by breathing2004

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After twenty-eight years of imprisonment and the death of his children, Húrin was released by Morgoth. "He had grown grim to look upon: his hair and beard were white and long, but there was a fell light in his eyes. He walked unbowed, and yet carried a great black staff; but he was girt with a sword."[2] He was brought to his old homelands in Hithlum, but the Easterlings living there at first did not recognize him and later feared him, believing he served their evil lord Morgoth. The House of Hador had been destroyed, and those who remained as slaves or outlaws held him in suspicion and fear.

Seven outlaws under Asgon joined Húrin, and together they went to the Vale of Sirion. Húrin abandoned his followers and sought the entrance to Gondolin, but the Hidden City was closed, and Turgon at first did not wish to allow him in. Húrin cried out against Turgon, thus revealing the location of Gondolin to Morgoth's spies, and then left. Only after he had left did Turgon have a change of heart and send Eagles to fetch him, but they came too late and did not find him.

Húrin continued to the forest of Brethil where his son and daughter had died, and met his wife Morwen there at their grave at Cabed-en-Aras, just before she, too, died. In anger and despair he sought out the Folk of Haleth, blaming them for the death of his wife and children, and caused a revolt that killed the last Haladin. For Hardang the Chieftain of Brethil feared and dishonoured Húrin, imprisoning and trying to kill him. Húrin's cause was defended by Manthor, and they managed to set the Folk of Brethil against Hardang and slay him. But Manthor himself was killed, and guessed the will of Húrin: "Was not this your true errand, Man of the North: to bring ruin upon us to weigh against thine own?"[2]

Húrin met up again with the outlaws, and together they went to Nargothrond, where Húrin killed the Petty-dwarf Mîm who had claimed the treasure of Glaurung, earning a curse on the gold. Húrin and his outlaws brought the treasure, including the Nauglamír, to Doriath, insulting Thingol by giving it as a fee for his 'good care' of Húrin's kin.[3] Húrin thus brought a curse on Doriath as well, eventually leading to its downfall.

Melian's kind words managed to break through to Húrin's clouded mind, and Húrin finally saw that all his deeds had only aided Morgoth. A broken man, he was rumoured to have cast himself in the sea and killed himself. That was the end of Húrin, who had been known as the "mightiest of the warriors of mortal men".

captive of Hurin by breathing2004

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Túrin Turambar came to Nargothrond and became one of its greatest warriors,  he persuaded the people to fight openly against Morgoth and bulit the bridge over the gate of Nargothrond , which eventually led to its sack by the army of the dragon Glaurung.

first part of fate of turinsong of helmet and bow by breathing2004
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Eärendil means 'Lover of the Sea' in Tolkien's invented language of Quenya. However, Tolkien borrowed the name from Old English literature. Tolkien states (Letters, 297) that the name comes from Anglo-Saxon éarendel. He was struck by its "great beauty" c. 1913, which he perceived as

entirely coherent with the normal style of A-S, but euphonic to a peculiar degree in that pleasing but not 'delectable' language.

There is a poem by Tolkien dated to 1914 entitled "The Voyage of Eärendel the Evening Star" (published in The Book of Lost Tales 2 267–269). Tolkien was also aware of the name's Germanic cognates (Old Norse AurvandillLombardic Auriwandalo), and the question why the Anglo-Saxon one rather than the Lombardic or Proto-Germanic form should be taken up in the mythology is alluded to in The Notion Club Papers. The Old Norse together with the Anglo-Saxon evidence point to an astronomical myth, the name referring to a star, or a group of stars, and the Anglo-Saxon in particular points to the morning staras the herald of the rising Sun (in Crist Christianized to refer to John the Baptist).

Tolkien was particularly inspired by the lines in the Crist written by Cynewulf:[1]

éala éarendel engla beorhtast / ofer middangeard monnum sended"Hail Earendel, brightest of angels, over Middle-earth to men sent"

which can be taken as the inspiration not only for the role of Eärendil in Tolkien's work, but also for the term Middle-earth (translating Middangeard) for the inhabitable lands (c.f. Midgard).

The first line is paralleled by Frodo Baggins' exclamation in The Two Towers (the line appears in The Return of the King in the Peter Jackson films), Aiya Eärendil Elenion Ancalima! which is Quenya, and translates to "Hail Eärendil, brightest of stars!" Frodo's exclamation was in reference to the 'Star-glass' he carried, which contained the light of Eärendil's star, the Silmaril.

Untitled by breathing2004 Untitled by breathing2004 Untitled by breathing2004 Untitled by breathing2004 

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Thingol thought to place the Silmaril into the Necklace, and hired the Dwarves of Nogrod to do so. The Dwarven craftsmen also coveted the jewel and seeing that it was by their skill that the piece was made, saw no reason to give it up willingly. Thingol became enraged declaring that he was of the first Eldar to set off on The Great Journey and that they were guests in his realm. When he tried to take it from the Dwarves they slew him. This set off a chain of events leading to the destruction of Doriath and the scattering of its people. After Thingol's death Melian, who remained in Middle-earth by binding her spirit to that of her husband, chose to forsake her body and return to Aman as a Maia, removing the power which once protected it, leaving Doriath vulnerable to attack from without.

fate of Beren and Luthien by breathing2004
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After the catastrophe of the Fifth Battle, the Nírnaeth Arnoediad, the boy Túrin is sent to Doriath for protection from Morgoth's special enmity for the House of Húrin. Beleg becomes the mentor, steadfast friend and brother-in-arms of Túrin Turambar. The two fight together in defending the north marches of Doriath from the Orcs of Morgoth. When Túrin is accused of murder, Beleg searches out and produces at the last moment a witness who can testify to extenuating circumstances. When Túrin pridefully leaves Doriath after the affair, Beleg receives permission from Thingol to follow him into exile and is granted the sword Anglachel to help in this endeavour. Beleg long seeks Túrin. At Amon Rûdh he is captured and tortured by Túrin's men, until Túrin returns and releases him. Although Beleg beseeches Túrin to return to Doriath, where he has been pardoned and would be welcomed, Túrin still pridefully refuses and Beleg loyally chooses to stay with Túrin. Together, with Túrin wearing the Dragon-helm of Dor-lómin, they lead a band of men against the invaders of Morgoth. The land where the "Two Captains" dwell becomes known as the Land of Helm and Bow, but the small realm was destroyed two years later.

When Túrin is captured by Morgoth in a treacherous ambush, Beleg is grievously wounded. Yet with the strength of a great Elven warrior and his extraordinary healing skills, he recovers swiftly and tracks the Orcs. In the deadly land of Taur-nu-Fuin Beleg meets the elf Gwindor, recently escaped from Morgoth's thraldom, and together they rescue Túrin, with Beleg performing an heroic feat ofbowmanship, slaying numerous wolf sentinels in the dark. After they carry Túrin from the Orc-camp, while removing Túrin's bonds, Beleg accidentally cut Túrin with his sword. Túrin awakes and does not recognize Beleg in the darkness, mistaking the shape over him with a blade as an Orc. In a sudden rage of self-defence, he wrests the sword from Beleg and kills him. When he recognizes the truth of his friend's loyalty and bravery and his own fatal mistake, Túrin is so overcome with grief that he walks in a daze for weeks, being led out of danger by Gwindor. After returning to himself, Túrin takes Beleg's sword Anglachel, renaming it Gurthang ("Iron of Death"), and wields it in further battles against Morgoth's forces for the rest of his life. Years later, Túrin himself dies upon the sword Gurthang when his tragic life becomes too hard to bear, and the sword is thus avenged for the death of Beleg.[4]

After a time in grief and in honour of his friend, Túrin made and sang the Laer Cú Beleg, the Song of the Great Bow.

fate of turin continue in Turin and fall of Nargothrond by breathing2004

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After twenty-eight years of imprisonment and the death of his children, Húrin was released by Morgoth. "He had grown grim to look upon: his hair and beard were white and long, but there was a fell light in his eyes. He walked unbowed, and yet carried a great black staff; but he was girt with a sword."[2] He was brought to his old homelands in Hithlum, but the Easterlings living there at first did not recognize him and later feared him, believing he served their evil lord Morgoth. The House of Hador had been destroyed, and those who remained as slaves or outlaws held him in suspicion and fear.

Seven outlaws under Asgon joined Húrin, and together they went to the Vale of Sirion. Húrin abandoned his followers and sought the entrance to Gondolin, but the Hidden City was closed, and Turgon at first did not wish to allow him in. Húrin cried out against Turgon, thus revealing the location of Gondolin to Morgoth's spies, and then left. Only after he had left did Turgon have a change of heart and send Eagles to fetch him, but they came too late and did not find him.

Húrin continued to the forest of Brethil where his son and daughter had died, and met his wife Morwen there at their grave at Cabed-en-Aras, just before she, too, died. In anger and despair he sought out the Folk of Haleth, blaming them for the death of his wife and children, and caused a revolt that killed the last Haladin. For Hardang the Chieftain of Brethil feared and dishonoured Húrin, imprisoning and trying to kill him. Húrin's cause was defended by Manthor, and they managed to set the Folk of Brethil against Hardang and slay him. But Manthor himself was killed, and guessed the will of Húrin: "Was not this your true errand, Man of the North: to bring ruin upon us to weigh against thine own?"[2]

Húrin met up again with the outlaws, and together they went to Nargothrond, where Húrin killed the Petty-dwarf Mîm who had claimed the treasure of Glaurung, earning a curse on the gold. Húrin and his outlaws brought the treasure, including the Nauglamír, to Doriath, insulting Thingol by giving it as a fee for his 'good care' of Húrin's kin.[3] Húrin thus brought a curse on Doriath as well, eventually leading to its downfall.

Melian's kind words managed to break through to Húrin's clouded mind, and Húrin finally saw that all his deeds had only aided Morgoth. A broken man, he was rumoured to have cast himself in the sea and killed himself. That was the end of Húrin, who had been known as the "mightiest of the warriors of mortal men".

captive of Hurin by breathing2004

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Túrin Turambar came to Nargothrond and became one of its greatest warriors,  he persuaded the people to fight openly against Morgoth and bulit the bridge over the gate of Nargothrond , which eventually led to its sack by the army of the dragon Glaurung.

first part of fate of turinsong of helmet and bow by breathing2004
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Eärendil means 'Lover of the Sea' in Tolkien's invented language of Quenya. However, Tolkien borrowed the name from Old English literature. Tolkien states (Letters, 297) that the name comes from Anglo-Saxon éarendel. He was struck by its "great beauty" c. 1913, which he perceived as

entirely coherent with the normal style of A-S, but euphonic to a peculiar degree in that pleasing but not 'delectable' language.

There is a poem by Tolkien dated to 1914 entitled "The Voyage of Eärendel the Evening Star" (published in The Book of Lost Tales 2 267–269). Tolkien was also aware of the name's Germanic cognates (Old Norse AurvandillLombardic Auriwandalo), and the question why the Anglo-Saxon one rather than the Lombardic or Proto-Germanic form should be taken up in the mythology is alluded to in The Notion Club Papers. The Old Norse together with the Anglo-Saxon evidence point to an astronomical myth, the name referring to a star, or a group of stars, and the Anglo-Saxon in particular points to the morning staras the herald of the rising Sun (in Crist Christianized to refer to John the Baptist).

Tolkien was particularly inspired by the lines in the Crist written by Cynewulf:[1]

éala éarendel engla beorhtast / ofer middangeard monnum sended"Hail Earendel, brightest of angels, over Middle-earth to men sent"

which can be taken as the inspiration not only for the role of Eärendil in Tolkien's work, but also for the term Middle-earth (translating Middangeard) for the inhabitable lands (c.f. Midgard).

The first line is paralleled by Frodo Baggins' exclamation in The Two Towers (the line appears in The Return of the King in the Peter Jackson films), Aiya Eärendil Elenion Ancalima! which is Quenya, and translates to "Hail Eärendil, brightest of stars!" Frodo's exclamation was in reference to the 'Star-glass' he carried, which contained the light of Eärendil's star, the Silmaril.

Untitled by breathing2004 Untitled by breathing2004 Untitled by breathing2004 Untitled by breathing2004 

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may the moon goddess bless everyone in Azoerth
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Húrin Thalion (pronounced [ˈhuːrin ˈθaliɔn]Sindarin for The Steadfast) was the elder son of Galdor the Tall of the House of Hador and Hareth of the Haladin, and he had a younger brother named Huor.

When the 
Union of Maedhros prepared to battle with Morgoth, Húrin feared little that they would be defeated. In 472, in the Nírnaeth Arnoediad, Húrin rode his horse Arroch, 'Noble horse',[1] to the battle and, leading the Folk of Hador, he fought alongside his brother, Huor. In the midst of battle he met Turgon again. When the battle was lost, Húrin and Huor took a stand fighting off the Orcs, allowing Turgon to escape. Huor and all the Men of Dor-lómin were slain, but Húrin fought with his battle-axe until his axe withered, he was buried under a mountain of slain Orcs and Trolls. Húrin was then bound alive by Gothmog Lord of Balrogs and brought captive to Angband.

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During the ensuing War of WrathBeleriand and much of the north of Middle-earth was destroyed and reshaped. In the end, Morgoth was utterly defeated, and his armies were almost entirely slaughtered. Thedragons were almost all destroyed, and Thangorodrim was shattered when Eärendil slew the greatest of dragons, Ancalagon the Black, who crashed upon it as he fell. The few remaining dragons were scattered, and the handful of surviving Balrogs hid themselves deep within the earth. Morgoth fled into the deepest pit and begged for pardon, but his feet were cut from under him, his crown was made into a collar, and he was chained once again with Angainor. The Valar exiled him permanently from the world, thrusting him through the Door of Night into the void, excluded from Arda until the prophesied Dagor Dagorath, when he would meet his final destruction. His evil remained, however, as "Arda Marred," and his will influenced all living creatures.
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The island was brought up from the sea as a gift from the Valar to the Edain, the Fathers of Men who had stood with the Elves of Beleriand against Morgoth in the War of the Jewels. Númenor was meant to be a "rest after the war" for the Edain.[4] Early in the Second Age the greater part of those Edain that survived their defeat from Morgoth journeyed to the isle, sailing in ships provided and steered by the Elves. The migration took fifty years and brought 5,000 to 10,000 men, women and children.[5]

The realm was officially established in S.A. 32,[6][7] and Elros Half-elven, son of Eärendil, and brother of Elrond and descendant of all the royal houses of Elves and Edain, became the first King of Númenor. Under his rule, and those of his descendants, the Númenóreans rose to become a powerful people. The first ships sailed from Númenor to Middle-earth in the year 600 of the Second Age.

The Númenóreans were forbidden by the Valar from sailing so far westward that Númenor was no longer visible, for fear that they would come upon the Undying Lands, to which Men could not come. For a long time, Númenor remained friendly with the Elves, both of Eressëa and of Middle-earth, and between S.A. 1693-1700, they assisted Gil-galad in the War of the Elves and Sauron, which broke out after the forging of the Great Rings, in particular the One Ring. King Tar-Minastir and the forces of Númenor were without peer in war, and together with the Elves, they were able to temporarily defeat Sauron. Over time the Númenóreans became jealous of the Elves for their immortality, and began to resent the Ban of the Valar and to rebel against their authority, seeking the everlasting life that they believed was begrudged them. They tried to compensate for this by going eastward and colonizing large parts of Middle-earth, first in a friendly manner, but later as cruel tyrants. Soon the Númenóreans came to rule a great coastal empire that had no rival. Few (the "Faithful") remained loyal to the Valar and friendly to the Elves.

In the year 3255 of the Second Age, the 25th king, Ar-Pharazôn, sailed to Middle-earth and landed at Umbar. Seeing the might of Númenor, Sauron's armies fled and Sauron surrendered without a fight. He was brought back to Númenor as a prisoner but he soon became an advisor to the king and promised the Númenóreans eternal life if they worshipped Melkor. With Sauron as his advisor, Ar-Pharazôn had a 500-foot (150 m) tall temple to Melkor erected, in which he offered human sacrifices to Melkor (those selected to be sacrificed were Elendili, Númenóreans who were still faithful to the Elves).

During this time, the White Tree Nimloth, which stood before the King's House in Armenelos and whose fate was said to be tied to the line of kings, was chopped down and burned as a sacrifice to Melkor at Sauron's direction. Isildur, heroically and at great personal risk, rescued a fruit of the tree which became an ancestor of the White Tree of Gondor, preserving the ancient line of trees.

Prompted by Sauron and fearing old age and death, Ar-Pharazôn built a great armada and set sail into the West to make war upon the Valar and seize the Undying Lands, and by so doing achieve immortality. Sauron remained behind. This force was quoted by Tolkien as the 'greatest force ever assembled on Arda'. In the year 3319 of the Second Age, Ar-Pharazôn landed on the shores of Aman. As the Valar were forbidden to take direct action against Men, Manwë, chief of the Valar, called upon Eru. The Undying Lands were removed from the world forever, and the formerly flat Earth was made into a globe. Númenor was overwhelmed in the cataclysm and sank beneath the sea, killing its inhabitants, including the body of Sauron who was thereby robbed of his ability to assume fair and charming forms, forever appearing in the form of a Dark Lord thereafter.

Elendil, son of the leader of the Faithful during the reign of Ar-Pharazôn, his sons and his followers had foreseen the disaster that was to befall Númenor, and they had set sail in nine ships before the island fell. They landed in Middle-earth and founded the kingdoms of Arnor and Gondor.

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farewell Frodo
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The son of Tuor and Idril, daughter of Turgon, Eärendil was raised in Gondolin. When Eärendil was seven years old, he escaped the sacking of Gondolin with his parents, living afterwards in Arvernien by the mouth of Sirion. Eärendil later became the leader of the people who lived there, and married Elwing, daughter of Dior the son of Beren and Lúthien. They had two sons, Elrond and Elros.

With the aid of Círdan the Shipwright, Eärendil built a ship, Vingilótë (or Vingilot), which is Quenya for "foam-flower". He sailed this often around the seas west of Middle-earth, leaving his wife behind in Arvernien. At this time Elwing had in her possession the Silmaril that Beren had wrested from Morgoth. News of this came to the sons of Fëanor who were still living, and they attacked the people living in Arvernien, and killed most of them. Elwing, rather than be captured, threw herself with the Silmaril into the sea. The Silmaril was not lost, however. According to The Silmarillion:

For Ulmo bore up Elwing out of the waves, and he gave her the likeness of a great white bird, and upon her breast there shone as a star the Silmaril, as she flew over the water to seek Eärendil her beloved. On a time of night Eärendil at the helm of his ship saw her come towards him, as a white cloud exceeding swift beneath the moon, as a star over the sea moving in strange courses, a pale flame on wings of storm. And it is sung that she fell from the air upon the timbers of Vingilot, in a swoon, nigh unto death for the urgency of her speed, and Eärendil took her to his bosom; but in the morning with marvelling eyes he beheld his wife in her own form beside him with her hair upon his face, and she slept.

Hearing of the tragedy that had befallen in Arvernien, Eärendil then sought after Valinor, aboard the Vingilot with Aerandir, Erellont, and Falathar, and he and Elwing found their way there at last. Eärendil thus became the first of all mortals to set foot in Valinor. Eärendil then went before the Valar, and asked them for aid for Men and Elves in Middle-earth, to fight against Morgoth; the Valar accepted his plea.

Because Eärendil had undertaken this errand on behalf of Men and Elves, and not for his own sake, Manwë forbore to deal out the punishment of death that was due. Also, because both Eärendil and Elwing were descended from a union of Elves and Men, Manwë granted to them and their sons the gift to choose to which race they would be joined (a gift that was further passed to the children of Elrond, who became known as the Half-elven). Elwing chose to be one of the Elves. Eärendil would have rather been one of the Men; however, for the sake of his wife, he chose to be one of the Elves. The Silmarillionsays this:

Now when first Vingilot was set to sail in the seas of heaven, it rose unlooked for, glittering and bright; and the people of Middle-earth beheld it from afar and wondered, and they took it for a sign, and called it Gil-Estel, the Star of High Hope.

The Valar, having listened to Eärendil's plea, went with a mighty host to Middle-earth, and overthrew Morgoth. Eärendil took part in the battle, riding on Vingilot beside Thorondor and the Eagles. He struck down the great dragon Ancalagon and cast him down onto Thangorodrim, the event which, along with the sheer devastation caused by the War of Wrath, led to the Ruin of Beleriand. However, right before the Dagor Dagorath, the Last Battle, Morgoth will escape out the Door of Night to destroy Arda. It is implied Eärendil shall participate in that, alongside every creature in Middle-earth, good and evil.

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Fingon, the Valiant was an Ñoldorin elf, the eldest son of Fingolfin, and older brother of TurgonAredhel, andArgon.[1]

He was High King of the Ñoldor in Middle-earth during the First Age after the death of his father. He was an instrument in healing the rift between the Sons of Fëanor and the followers of his father after their desertion of them in Araman.

Fingon's final battle was the Nirnaeth Arnoediad (Battle of Unnumbered Tears). Fingon led the attack on Angband, and the fury of his warriors nearly won the day. Unfortunately, due to Ulfang's treachery, Maedhros did not arrive until three days after he was expected. This resulted in Morgoth releasing his Balrogs and Glaurung the dragon on the already weakened Ñoldor force. When Maedhros finally arrived, hope was reborn for Fingon's army; however, Ulfang's treachery again took effect, causing Maedhros to withdraw. Fingon was then surrounded and his guards killed. He dueled Gothmog, lord of Balrogs, but was struck from behind by another. Gothmog then clove Fingon's helm, and fire sprang from it. This presumably killed Fingon instantly, but the Balrogs proceeded to beat his body into the dust long after he was dead. Thus the day ended in defeat for the elves.
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Paths of the Dead

The way is shut.
It was made by those who are Dead.
And the Dead keep it.
The way is shut.
Until the time comes. 

At the end of the Second Age, their king, known as the King of the Mountains, pledged allegiance to Isildur at the Stone of Erech. However, these Men later refused to aid Isildur in his war against Sauron; they came to the aid of neither side, but instead hid in the mountains. They had previously worshipped the Dark Lord during the Dark Years. As punishment, Isildur cursed them, saying that they would not have peace or rest till they fulfilled their oath upon his command or that of his heirs.

Their spirits haunted the caverns beneath the Dwimorberg, the Haunted Mountain, and the valley of Harrowdale that lay in its shadow—though they were said to appear in the valley only in times of trouble or death, haunting the hill of the Stone of Erech.

Malbeth the Seer prophesied that a day would come when need and haste would drive one of Isildur's heirs to take the Paths of the Dead and that the Dead would answer to his call. Thousands of years later, in the final years of the Third Age, that prophecy was fulfilled. In the War of the RingAragorn, Isildur's heir and direct descendant, called upon the Dead, summoning them to the stone of Erech, and commanded them to fulfil their oath and be free. On this occasion, he first uses the royal banner of Gondor, made by Arwen and delivered to him by Halbarad and the Grey Company.

They followed him through Gondor's lands and fiefs south of the Mountains, and at the port of Pelargir they drove away the Corsairs of Umbar, allies of Sauron. Their oath fulfilled, Aragorn granted them their freedom, and they vanished at last from the world. After this, Aragorn gathered the warriors of the region to him. They sailed to Minas Tirith on the Corsairs' own ships, and turned the tide at the Battle of the Pelennor Fields.

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"Now the streets of Gondolin were paved with stone and wide, kerbed with marble, and fair houses and courts amid gardens of bright flowers were set about the ways, and many towers of great slenderness and beauty builded of white marble and carved most marvelously rose to the heaven. Squares there were lit with fountains and the home of birds that sang amid the branches of their aged trees, but of all these the greatest was that place where stood the King's palace, and the tower thereof was the loftiest in the city, and the fountains that played before the doors shot twenty fathoms and seven in the air and fell in a singing rain of crystal; therein did the sun glitter splendidly by day, and the moon most magically shimmered by night. The birds that dwelt there were of the whiteness of snow and their voices sweeter than a lullaby of music.

 the Vala Ulmo, the Lord of Waters, revealed the location of the Vale of Tumladen to the Noldorin Lord Turgon in a dream around the year FA 50. Under this divine guidance, Turgon travelled from his kingdom in Nevrast and found the vale in FA 53. Within the Echoriath just west of Dorthonion and east of the River Sirion, lay a round level plain with sheer walls on all sides and a ravine and tunnel leading out to the southwest known as the Hidden Way. In the middle of the vale there was a steep hill which was calledAmon Gwareth. There Turgon decided to found a great city that would be protected by the mountains and hidden from the Dark Lord Morgoth.

For nearly seventy-five years, Turgon and his people built Gondolin in secret. After it was completed in FA 116, he took with him to dwell in the hidden city his entire people in Nevrast — almost a third of the Ñoldor — as well as nearly three quarters of the northern Sindar. The city stood for nearly 400 years until it was betrayed to Morgoth by Maeglin, Turgon's nephew, and sacked by the army of Morgoth the Dark Lord.[2]




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Vitraux
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from Harry potter
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 Vision of Time from game WoW 
 Kairozdormu/Kairoz
Garrosh Hellscream 
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《荣耀之城》Untitled by breathing2004 Untitled by breathing2004 Untitled by breathing2004 Untitled by breathing2004  

     

    图尔从高处往下望著美丽的俏拉登平原,觉得它彷佛是摆在环抱群山中的绿宝石一般;然後他望见了远处平原中央高高的岩石山丘葛威瑞斯,以及建在其上伟大的贡多林城。那城有七个名字,所有住在中土大陆的精灵所作的歌谣中,以它的声名与荣耀最丰隆浩大。在艾克希里昂的吩咐下,大门的高塔上吹起了响亮的号角,号声在群山之间回荡;随即从远方传来清晰的回应号声,从贡多林城的白墙上响起,随著黎明在平原上回荡。    

    ————《精灵宝钻》

    精灵宝钻里的中土世界是精灵的故乡,人类刚刚觉醒的时候,精灵已经拥有了强大的文明,也深受诸神喜爱,他们有的去过西方极乐之地,接受神明的指点,学到高深知识后重返中土,有的则留在中土按他们的心意建造美丽的城市,最终留下了很多著名的城市,有群山环抱的刚多林,有藏匿在美丽安环带中的千窟之城明霞国斯,还有位于深山有天堑河流保护的多瑞亚斯,还有受到海神保护的船民之城灰港,以及人类建立的王国努曼诺尔,他们都向往着远在不死之地的西方的维诺林——双圣树故乡。然而转眼就算拥有不朽生命的精灵也想不到,这些伟大城市都毁灭殆尽,只留片片废墟空留后人唏嘘,感叹造物弄人。

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Eärendil means 'Lover of the Sea' in Tolkien's invented language of Quenya. However, Tolkien borrowed the name from Old English literature. Tolkien states (Letters, 297) that the name comes from Anglo-Saxon éarendel. He was struck by its "great beauty" c. 1913, which he perceived as

entirely coherent with the normal style of A-S, but euphonic to a peculiar degree in that pleasing but not 'delectable' language.

There is a poem by Tolkien dated to 1914 entitled "The Voyage of Eärendel the Evening Star" (published in The Book of Lost Tales 2 267–269). Tolkien was also aware of the name's Germanic cognates (Old Norse AurvandillLombardic Auriwandalo), and the question why the Anglo-Saxon one rather than the Lombardic or Proto-Germanic form should be taken up in the mythology is alluded to in The Notion Club Papers. The Old Norse together with the Anglo-Saxon evidence point to an astronomical myth, the name referring to a star, or a group of stars, and the Anglo-Saxon in particular points to the morning staras the herald of the rising Sun (in Crist Christianized to refer to John the Baptist).

Tolkien was particularly inspired by the lines in the Crist written by Cynewulf:[1]

éala éarendel engla beorhtast / ofer middangeard monnum sended"Hail Earendel, brightest of angels, over Middle-earth to men sent"

which can be taken as the inspiration not only for the role of Eärendil in Tolkien's work, but also for the term Middle-earth (translating Middangeard) for the inhabitable lands (c.f. Midgard).

The first line is paralleled by Frodo Baggins' exclamation in The Two Towers (the line appears in The Return of the King in the Peter Jackson films), Aiya Eärendil Elenion Ancalima! which is Quenya, and translates to "Hail Eärendil, brightest of stars!" Frodo's exclamation was in reference to the 'Star-glass' he carried, which contained the light of Eärendil's star, the Silmaril.

Untitled by breathing2004 Untitled by breathing2004 Untitled by breathing2004 Untitled by breathing2004 

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The Mists of Avalon is a 1983 novel by Marion Zimmer Bradley, in which she relates the Arthurian legends from the perspective of the female characters. The book follows the trajectory of Morgaine (often called Morgan le Fay in other works), a priestess fighting to save her matriarchal Celtic culture in a country wherepatriarchal Christianity threatens to destroy the pagan way of life.[1] The epic is focused on the lives of GwenhwyfarVivianeMorgauseIgraine and other women who are often marginalized in Arthurian retellings. King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table are supporting rather than main characters.

The Mists of Avalon is in stark contrast to most other retellings of the Arthurian tales, which consistently cast Morgan le Fay as a distant, one-dimensional evil sorceress, with little or no explanation given for her antagonism to the Round Table. In this case Morgaine is presented as a woman with unique gifts and responsibilities at a time of enormous political and spiritual upheaval who is called upon to defend her indigenous matriarchal heritage against impossible odds.The Mists of Avalon stands as a watershed for feminist interpretation of male-centered myth by articulating women's experiences at times of great change and shifts in gender-power. The typical battles, quests, and feuds of King Arthur's reign act as secondary elements to the women's lives.

The story is told in four large parts: Book One: Mistress of MagicBook Two: The High QueenBook Three: The King Stag, and Book Four: The Prisoner in the Oak. The novel was a best-seller upon its publication and remains popular to this day. Bradley and Diana L. Paxson later expanded the book into the Avalon series.

this is the chinese version will published in 2015 in china soon

cover of book 1
cover for The Mists of Avalon book 1 by breathing2004

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Tierra Media
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Nice map, the best I found around...

I found this map online, it is by Daniel Reeve (visit his site for more middle earth maps, and stuff) ...
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add a new coloring version,hope you like it


In The Hobbit, Bilbo Baggins, a hobbit in comfortable middle age at 50 years old, was hired in spite of himself as a "burglar" by the wizard Gandalf and 13 dwarves led by their king Thorin Oakenshield on a quest to reclaim the Lonely Mountain and its treasure from the dragon Smaug. The adventure took Bilbo and the companions through the wilderness, to the elf haven of Rivendell, across the Misty Mountains and the black forest of Mirkwood, to Lake-town in the middle of Long Lake, and eventually to the Mountain itself. Here, after the dragon was killed and the Mountain reclaimed, the Battle of Five Armies took place.

In his journey, Bilbo encountered other fantastic creatures, including trolls, elves, giant spiders, a man who can change shape into a bear, goblins, eagles, wolves and a slimy, murderous creature named Gollum. Underground, near Gollum's lair, Bilbo accidentally found a magic ring of invisibility, which he used to escape from Gollum.

By the end of the journey, Bilbo had become wiser and more confident, having saved the day in many gruesome situations. He rescued the dwarves from giant spiders with the magic ring and a short Elven-sword he acquired. He used the ring to sneak around in hostile environments, as well as his wits to smuggle the dwarves out of the elves' prisons. He was able to hold his own in conversation with the wily Smaug. When tensions arose over ownership of the recovered treasure, he tried unsuccessfully to bring the opposing sides to compromise, using a stolen heirloom jewel as leverage. This strained his relationship with Thorin, but the two were reconciled at Thorin's deathbed. At the end of the story, Bilbo returned to his home in the Shire only to find that several of his relatives, believing him to be dead, were trying to claim his home and possessions. In addition to becoming wealthy from his share of the dwarves' treasure, he found that he had traded respectability for experience and wisdom.

other LOTR artwork of mine:
:thumb324611190::thumb324564146::thumb298350523::thumb211940262::thumb209201679:
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Galadriel welcomed the Fellowship to Lothlórien after their escape from Moria. When she met the Fellowship in her tree dwelling at Caras Galadhon, she gave each member a searching look, testing their resolve — though Boromir interpreted this test as a temptation. She was in turn tested when Frodo Baggins offered to place the Ring in her keeping. Knowing that its corrupting influence would make her "great and terrible", and recalling the ambitions that had once brought her to Middle-earth, she refused the Ring. She accepted that her own ring's power would fail and that her people would diminish and fade with the One Ring's destruction, and that her only escape from the fading of the Elves and the dominion of Men was to return at last to Valinor. There is the suggestion in the novel, backed up by other writings,[5] that in acknowledgement of this renunciation of power her personal ban from Valinor was lifted and she was finally given leave to return over the sea.

and the elves on the bottom of the pic is some part works did for :~bastler:
update a new print-sell version

:thumb209201679:
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    'Listen! They are coming this way,' said Frodo. 'We have only to wait.' The singing drew nearer. One clear voice rose now above the others. It was singing in the fair elven-tongue, of which Frodo knew only a little, and the others knew nothing. Yet the sound blending with the melody seemed to shape itself in their thought into words which they only partly understood. This was the song as Frodo heard it:

    Snow-white! Snow-white! O Lady clear!

    O Queen beyond the Western Seas!

    O Light to us that wander here

    Amid the world of woven trees!

    Gilthoniel! O Elbereth!

    Clear are thy eyes and bright thy breath!

    Snow-white! Snow-white! We sing to thee

    In a far land beyond the Sea.

    O stars that in the Sunless Year

    With shining hand by her were sawn,

    In windy fields now bright and clear

    We see your silver blossom blown!

    O Elbereth! Gilthoniel!

    We still remember, we who dwell

    In this far land beneath the trees,

    Thy starlight on the Western Seas.

    The song ended. 'These are High Elves! They spoke the name of Elbereth!' said Frodo in amazement, 'Few of that fairest folk are ever seen in the Shire. Not many now remain in Middle-earth, east of the Great Sea. This is indeed a strange chance!'

-------------from chapter III<three is company>

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Tolkien:Lord of the middle earth
English writer, scholar and philologist, Tolkien's father was a bank manager in South Africa. When his father died in 1896 his mother took him and his younger brother to his father's native village of Sarehole, near Birmingham, England. The landscapes and Nordic mythology of the Midlands may have been the source for Tolkien's fertile imagination to... See full bio »
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The son of Tuor and Idril, daughter of Turgon, Eärendil was raised in Gondolin. When Eärendil was seven years old, he escaped the sacking of Gondolin with his parents, living afterwards in Arvernien by the mouth of Sirion. Eärendil later became the leader of the people who lived there, and married Elwing, daughter of Dior the son of Beren and Lúthien. They had two sons, Elrond and Elros.

With the aid of Círdan the Shipwright, Eärendil built a ship, Vingilótë (or Vingilot), which is Quenya for "foam-flower". He sailed this often around the seas west of Middle-earth, leaving his wife behind in Arvernien. At this time Elwing had in her possession the Silmaril that Beren had wrested from Morgoth. News of this came to the sons of Fëanor who were still living, and they attacked the people living in Arvernien, and killed most of them. Elwing, rather than be captured, threw herself with the Silmaril into the sea. The Silmaril was not lost, however. According to The Silmarillion:

For Ulmo bore up Elwing out of the waves, and he gave her the likeness of a great white bird, and upon her breast there shone as a star the Silmaril, as she flew over the water to seek Eärendil her beloved. On a time of night Eärendil at the helm of his ship saw her come towards him, as a white cloud exceeding swift beneath the moon, as a star over the sea moving in strange courses, a pale flame on wings of storm. And it is sung that she fell from the air upon the timbers of Vingilot, in a swoon, nigh unto death for the urgency of her speed, and Eärendil took her to his bosom; but in the morning with marvelling eyes he beheld his wife in her own form beside him with her hair upon his face, and she slept.

Hearing of the tragedy that had befallen in Arvernien, Eärendil then sought after Valinor, aboard the Vingilot with Aerandir, Erellont, and Falathar, and he and Elwing found their way there at last. Eärendil thus became the first of all mortals to set foot in Valinor. Eärendil then went before the Valar, and asked them for aid for Men and Elves in Middle-earth, to fight against Morgoth; the Valar accepted his plea.

Because Eärendil had undertaken this errand on behalf of Men and Elves, and not for his own sake, Manwë forbore to deal out the punishment of death that was due. Also, because both Eärendil and Elwing were descended from a union of Elves and Men, Manwë granted to them and their sons the gift to choose to which race they would be joined (a gift that was further passed to the children of Elrond, who became known as the Half-elven). Elwing chose to be one of the Elves. Eärendil would have rather been one of the Men; however, for the sake of his wife, he chose to be one of the Elves. The Silmarillionsays this:

Now when first Vingilot was set to sail in the seas of heaven, it rose unlooked for, glittering and bright; and the people of Middle-earth beheld it from afar and wondered, and they took it for a sign, and called it Gil-Estel, the Star of High Hope.

The Valar, having listened to Eärendil's plea, went with a mighty host to Middle-earth, and overthrew Morgoth. Eärendil took part in the battle, riding on Vingilot beside Thorondor and the Eagles. He struck down the great dragon Ancalagon and cast him down onto Thangorodrim, the event which, along with the sheer devastation caused by the War of Wrath, led to the Ruin of Beleriand. However, right before the Dagor Dagorath, the Last Battle, Morgoth will escape out the Door of Night to destroy Arda. It is implied Eärendil shall participate in that, alongside every creature in Middle-earth, good and evil.

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"Now the streets of Gondolin were paved with stone and wide, kerbed with marble, and fair houses and courts amid gardens of bright flowers were set about the ways, and many towers of great slenderness and beauty builded of white marble and carved most marvelously rose to the heaven. Squares there were lit with fountains and the home of birds that sang amid the branches of their aged trees, but of all these the greatest was that place where stood the King's palace, and the tower thereof was the loftiest in the city, and the fountains that played before the doors shot twenty fathoms and seven in the air and fell in a singing rain of crystal; therein did the sun glitter splendidly by day, and the moon most magically shimmered by night. The birds that dwelt there were of the whiteness of snow and their voices sweeter than a lullaby of music.

 the Vala Ulmo, the Lord of Waters, revealed the location of the Vale of Tumladen to the Noldorin Lord Turgon in a dream around the year FA 50. Under this divine guidance, Turgon travelled from his kingdom in Nevrast and found the vale in FA 53. Within the Echoriath just west of Dorthonion and east of the River Sirion, lay a round level plain with sheer walls on all sides and a ravine and tunnel leading out to the southwest known as the Hidden Way. In the middle of the vale there was a steep hill which was calledAmon Gwareth. There Turgon decided to found a great city that would be protected by the mountains and hidden from the Dark Lord Morgoth.

For nearly seventy-five years, Turgon and his people built Gondolin in secret. After it was completed in FA 116, he took with him to dwell in the hidden city his entire people in Nevrast — almost a third of the Ñoldor — as well as nearly three quarters of the northern Sindar. The city stood for nearly 400 years until it was betrayed to Morgoth by Maeglin, Turgon's nephew, and sacked by the army of Morgoth the Dark Lord.[2]




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from Harry potter
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 Vision of Time from game WoW 
 Kairozdormu/Kairoz
Garrosh Hellscream 
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《荣耀之城》Untitled by breathing2004 Untitled by breathing2004 Untitled by breathing2004 Untitled by breathing2004  

     

    图尔从高处往下望著美丽的俏拉登平原,觉得它彷佛是摆在环抱群山中的绿宝石一般;然後他望见了远处平原中央高高的岩石山丘葛威瑞斯,以及建在其上伟大的贡多林城。那城有七个名字,所有住在中土大陆的精灵所作的歌谣中,以它的声名与荣耀最丰隆浩大。在艾克希里昂的吩咐下,大门的高塔上吹起了响亮的号角,号声在群山之间回荡;随即从远方传来清晰的回应号声,从贡多林城的白墙上响起,随著黎明在平原上回荡。    

    ————《精灵宝钻》

    精灵宝钻里的中土世界是精灵的故乡,人类刚刚觉醒的时候,精灵已经拥有了强大的文明,也深受诸神喜爱,他们有的去过西方极乐之地,接受神明的指点,学到高深知识后重返中土,有的则留在中土按他们的心意建造美丽的城市,最终留下了很多著名的城市,有群山环抱的刚多林,有藏匿在美丽安环带中的千窟之城明霞国斯,还有位于深山有天堑河流保护的多瑞亚斯,还有受到海神保护的船民之城灰港,以及人类建立的王国努曼诺尔,他们都向往着远在不死之地的西方的维诺林——双圣树故乡。然而转眼就算拥有不朽生命的精灵也想不到,这些伟大城市都毁灭殆尽,只留片片废墟空留后人唏嘘,感叹造物弄人。

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Eärendil means 'Lover of the Sea' in Tolkien's invented language of Quenya. However, Tolkien borrowed the name from Old English literature. Tolkien states (Letters, 297) that the name comes from Anglo-Saxon éarendel. He was struck by its "great beauty" c. 1913, which he perceived as

entirely coherent with the normal style of A-S, but euphonic to a peculiar degree in that pleasing but not 'delectable' language.

There is a poem by Tolkien dated to 1914 entitled "The Voyage of Eärendel the Evening Star" (published in The Book of Lost Tales 2 267–269). Tolkien was also aware of the name's Germanic cognates (Old Norse AurvandillLombardic Auriwandalo), and the question why the Anglo-Saxon one rather than the Lombardic or Proto-Germanic form should be taken up in the mythology is alluded to in The Notion Club Papers. The Old Norse together with the Anglo-Saxon evidence point to an astronomical myth, the name referring to a star, or a group of stars, and the Anglo-Saxon in particular points to the morning staras the herald of the rising Sun (in Crist Christianized to refer to John the Baptist).

Tolkien was particularly inspired by the lines in the Crist written by Cynewulf:[1]

éala éarendel engla beorhtast / ofer middangeard monnum sended"Hail Earendel, brightest of angels, over Middle-earth to men sent"

which can be taken as the inspiration not only for the role of Eärendil in Tolkien's work, but also for the term Middle-earth (translating Middangeard) for the inhabitable lands (c.f. Midgard).

The first line is paralleled by Frodo Baggins' exclamation in The Two Towers (the line appears in The Return of the King in the Peter Jackson films), Aiya Eärendil Elenion Ancalima! which is Quenya, and translates to "Hail Eärendil, brightest of stars!" Frodo's exclamation was in reference to the 'Star-glass' he carried, which contained the light of Eärendil's star, the Silmaril.

Untitled by breathing2004 Untitled by breathing2004 Untitled by breathing2004 Untitled by breathing2004 

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The Mists of Avalon is a 1983 novel by Marion Zimmer Bradley, in which she relates the Arthurian legends from the perspective of the female characters. The book follows the trajectory of Morgaine (often called Morgan le Fay in other works), a priestess fighting to save her matriarchal Celtic culture in a country wherepatriarchal Christianity threatens to destroy the pagan way of life.[1] The epic is focused on the lives of GwenhwyfarVivianeMorgauseIgraine and other women who are often marginalized in Arthurian retellings. King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table are supporting rather than main characters.

The Mists of Avalon is in stark contrast to most other retellings of the Arthurian tales, which consistently cast Morgan le Fay as a distant, one-dimensional evil sorceress, with little or no explanation given for her antagonism to the Round Table. In this case Morgaine is presented as a woman with unique gifts and responsibilities at a time of enormous political and spiritual upheaval who is called upon to defend her indigenous matriarchal heritage against impossible odds.The Mists of Avalon stands as a watershed for feminist interpretation of male-centered myth by articulating women's experiences at times of great change and shifts in gender-power. The typical battles, quests, and feuds of King Arthur's reign act as secondary elements to the women's lives.

The story is told in four large parts: Book One: Mistress of MagicBook Two: The High QueenBook Three: The King Stag, and Book Four: The Prisoner in the Oak. The novel was a best-seller upon its publication and remains popular to this day. Bradley and Diana L. Paxson later expanded the book into the Avalon series.

this is the chinese version will published in 2015 in china soon

cover of book 1
cover for The Mists of Avalon book 1 by breathing2004

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"Now the streets of Gondolin were paved with stone and wide, kerbed with marble, and fair houses and courts amid gardens of bright flowers were set about the ways, and many towers of great slenderness and beauty builded of white marble and carved most marvelously rose to the heaven. Squares there were lit with fountains and the home of birds that sang amid the branches of their aged trees, but of all these the greatest was that place where stood the King's palace, and the tower thereof was the loftiest in the city, and the fountains that played before the doors shot twenty fathoms and seven in the air and fell in a singing rain of crystal; therein did the sun glitter splendidly by day, and the moon most magically shimmered by night. The birds that dwelt there were of the whiteness of snow and their voices sweeter than a lullaby of music.

 the Vala Ulmo, the Lord of Waters, revealed the location of the Vale of Tumladen to the Noldorin Lord Turgon in a dream around the year FA 50. Under this divine guidance, Turgon travelled from his kingdom in Nevrast and found the vale in FA 53. Within the Echoriath just west of Dorthonion and east of the River Sirion, lay a round level plain with sheer walls on all sides and a ravine and tunnel leading out to the southwest known as the Hidden Way. In the middle of the vale there was a steep hill which was calledAmon Gwareth. There Turgon decided to found a great city that would be protected by the mountains and hidden from the Dark Lord Morgoth.

For nearly seventy-five years, Turgon and his people built Gondolin in secret. After it was completed in FA 116, he took with him to dwell in the hidden city his entire people in Nevrast — almost a third of the Ñoldor — as well as nearly three quarters of the northern Sindar. The city stood for nearly 400 years until it was betrayed to Morgoth by Maeglin, Turgon's nephew, and sacked by the army of Morgoth the Dark Lord.[2]




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The island was brought up from the sea as a gift from the Valar to the Edain, the Fathers of Men who had stood with the Elves of Beleriand against Morgoth in the War of the Jewels. Númenor was meant to be a "rest after the war" for the Edain.[4] Early in the Second Age the greater part of those Edain that survived their defeat from Morgoth journeyed to the isle, sailing in ships provided and steered by the Elves. The migration took fifty years and brought 5,000 to 10,000 men, women and children.[5]

The realm was officially established in S.A. 32,[6][7] and Elros Half-elven, son of Eärendil, and brother of Elrond and descendant of all the royal houses of Elves and Edain, became the first King of Númenor. Under his rule, and those of his descendants, the Númenóreans rose to become a powerful people. The first ships sailed from Númenor to Middle-earth in the year 600 of the Second Age.

The Númenóreans were forbidden by the Valar from sailing so far westward that Númenor was no longer visible, for fear that they would come upon the Undying Lands, to which Men could not come. For a long time, Númenor remained friendly with the Elves, both of Eressëa and of Middle-earth, and between S.A. 1693-1700, they assisted Gil-galad in the War of the Elves and Sauron, which broke out after the forging of the Great Rings, in particular the One Ring. King Tar-Minastir and the forces of Númenor were without peer in war, and together with the Elves, they were able to temporarily defeat Sauron. Over time the Númenóreans became jealous of the Elves for their immortality, and began to resent the Ban of the Valar and to rebel against their authority, seeking the everlasting life that they believed was begrudged them. They tried to compensate for this by going eastward and colonizing large parts of Middle-earth, first in a friendly manner, but later as cruel tyrants. Soon the Númenóreans came to rule a great coastal empire that had no rival. Few (the "Faithful") remained loyal to the Valar and friendly to the Elves.

In the year 3255 of the Second Age, the 25th king, Ar-Pharazôn, sailed to Middle-earth and landed at Umbar. Seeing the might of Númenor, Sauron's armies fled and Sauron surrendered without a fight. He was brought back to Númenor as a prisoner but he soon became an advisor to the king and promised the Númenóreans eternal life if they worshipped Melkor. With Sauron as his advisor, Ar-Pharazôn had a 500-foot (150 m) tall temple to Melkor erected, in which he offered human sacrifices to Melkor (those selected to be sacrificed were Elendili, Númenóreans who were still faithful to the Elves).

During this time, the White Tree Nimloth, which stood before the King's House in Armenelos and whose fate was said to be tied to the line of kings, was chopped down and burned as a sacrifice to Melkor at Sauron's direction. Isildur, heroically and at great personal risk, rescued a fruit of the tree which became an ancestor of the White Tree of Gondor, preserving the ancient line of trees.

Prompted by Sauron and fearing old age and death, Ar-Pharazôn built a great armada and set sail into the West to make war upon the Valar and seize the Undying Lands, and by so doing achieve immortality. Sauron remained behind. This force was quoted by Tolkien as the 'greatest force ever assembled on Arda'. In the year 3319 of the Second Age, Ar-Pharazôn landed on the shores of Aman. As the Valar were forbidden to take direct action against Men, Manwë, chief of the Valar, called upon Eru. The Undying Lands were removed from the world forever, and the formerly flat Earth was made into a globe. Númenor was overwhelmed in the cataclysm and sank beneath the sea, killing its inhabitants, including the body of Sauron who was thereby robbed of his ability to assume fair and charming forms, forever appearing in the form of a Dark Lord thereafter.

Elendil, son of the leader of the Faithful during the reign of Ar-Pharazôn, his sons and his followers had foreseen the disaster that was to befall Númenor, and they had set sail in nine ships before the island fell. They landed in Middle-earth and founded the kingdoms of Arnor and Gondor.

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“in the greatest of his achievements, captured the light of the Two Trees to make the three Silmarils, also called the Great Jewels, though they were not mere glittering stones, they were alive, imperishable, and sacred”
"Varda hallowed the Silmarils so that thereafter no mortal flesh, nor hands unclean, nor anything of evil will might touch them, but it was scorched and withered."

more art about LOTR :
:thumb359088094::thumb357822659::thumb356156478::thumb353198426::thumb348278170::thumb348024202::thumb344290706::thumb335476094::thumb333000165::thumb328677422::thumb327462140::thumb324611190::thumb324564146::thumb298350523::thumb211940262::thumb209201679:
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Ent

more art about LOTR :
fifteen birds in the trees by breathing2004Bilbo Baggins in bagend by breathing2004Feanor and Silmarils by breathing2004Narsilion by breathing2004progress of Ent the shepherd of forest by breathing2004eight legs nightmare by breathing2004:thumb364273777::thumb363077730::thumb360187749::thumb359088094::thumb357822659::thumb356156478::thumb353198426::thumb348278170::thumb348024202::thumb344290706::thumb335476094::thumb333000165::thumb328677422::thumb327462140::thumb324611190::thumb324564146::thumb298350523::thumb211940262::thumb209201679:
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