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The story begins in the Shire, where the Hobbit Frodo Baggins inherits the Ring from Bilbo, his cousin[note 2] and guardian. Neither is aware of its origin and nature, but Gandalf the Grey, a wizard and old friend of Bilbo, suspects the Ring's identity. When he becomes certain, he strongly advises Frodo to take it away from the Shire. Frodo leaves, accompanied by his gardener and friend, Samwise Gamgee, and two cousins, Meriadoc Brandybuck and Peregrin Took. They nearly encounter the Nazgûl while still in the Shire, but shake off pursuit by cutting through the Old Forest, where they are aided by the enigmatic Tom Bombadil, who alone is unaffected by the Ring's corrupting influence. After leaving the forest, they stop in the town of Bree where they meet Aragorn, Isildur's heir. He persuades them to take him on as guide and protector. They flee from Bree after narrowly escaping another assault, but the Nazgûl follow and attack them on the hill of Weathertop, wounding Frodo with a Morgul blade. Aragorn leads the hobbits toward the Elven refuge of Rivendell, while Frodo gradually succumbs to the wound. The Ringwraiths nearly overtake Frodo at the Ford of Bruinen, but flood waters summoned by Elrond, master of Rivendell, rise up and overwhelm them.
Frodo recovers in Rivendell under the care of Elrond. The Council of Elrond reveals much significant history about Sauron and the Ring, as well as the news that Sauron has corrupted Gandalf's fellow wizard, Saruman. The Council decides that the Ring must be destroyed, but that can only be done by returning it to the flames of Mount Doom in Mordor, where it was forged. Frodo volunteers to take on this daunting task, and a "Fellowship of the Ring" is formed to aid him: Sam, Merry, Pippin, Aragorn, Gandalf, Gimli the Dwarf, Legolas the Elf, and the Man Boromir, son of the Ruling Steward Denethor of the realm of Gondor.
After a failed attempt to cross the Misty Mountains via the pass below Caradhras, the company are forced to try a more perilous path through the Mines of Moria, where they are attacked by the Watcher in the Water before the gate. Inside, they discover the fate of Balin and his colony of Dwarves. After repulsing an attack, they are pursued by orcs and an ancient, powerful Balrog. Gandalf confronts the Balrog, but in their struggle, both fall into a deep chasm. The others escape and take refuge in the Elven forest of Lothlórien, where they are counselled by Galadriel and Celeborn.
With boats and gifts from Galadriel, the company travel down the River Anduin to the hill of Amon Hen. Boromir succumbs to the lure of the Ring and attempts to take it from Frodo. Frodo escapes and determines to continue the quest alone, though Sam guesses his intent and comes along. Meanwhile, orcs sent by Saruman and Sauron kill Boromir and kidnap Merry and Pippin.
After agonizing over which pair of hobbits to follow, Aragorn, Gimli and Legolas pursue the orcs bearing Merry and Pippin to Saruman. In the kingdom of Rohan, the orcs are slain by a company of the Rohirrim. Merry and Pippin escape into Fangorn Forest, where they are befriended by Treebeard, the oldest of the tree-like Ents. Aragorn, Gimli and Legolas track the hobbits to Fangorn, and encounter Gandalf, resurrected as the significantly more powerful "Gandalf the White" after his mutually fatal duel with the Balrog. Gandalf assures them that Merry and Pippin are safe. They then ride to Edoras, the capital of Rohan, where they free Théoden, King of Rohan, from the influence of Saruman's henchman Gríma Wormtongue. Théoden musters his fighting strength and rides to the ancient fortress of Helm's Deep, but en route Gandalf leaves to seek help from Treebeard.
Meanwhile, the Ents, roused from their customarily peaceful ways by Merry and Pippin, attack Isengard, Saruman's stronghold, and trap the wizard in the tower of Orthanc. Gandalf convinces Treebeard to send an army of Huorns to Théoden's aid. Gandalf and Rohirrim reinforcements arrive just in time to defeat and scatter Saruman's army. The Huorns dispose of the fleeing orcs. Gandalf then parleys with Saruman at Orthanc. When Saruman rejects his offer of redemption, Gandalf strips him of his rank and most of his powers. Pippin looks into a palantír, a seeing-stone that Saruman had used to communicate with Sauron and through which he was enslaved. Gandalf rides for Minas Tirith, chief city of Gondor, taking Pippin with him.
Frodo and Sam capture Gollum, who had been following them from Moria, and force him to guide them to Mordor. Finding Mordor's Black Gate too well guarded to attempt, they travel instead to a secret passage Gollum knows. Torn between his loyalty to Frodo and his desire for the Ring, Gollum eventually betrays Frodo by leading him to the great spider Shelob in the tunnels of Cirith Ungol. Frodo is felled by Shelob's bite, but Sam fights her off. Sam takes the Ring and leaves Frodo, believing him to be dead. When orcs find Frodo, Sam overhears them say that Frodo is only unconscious, and chases after them.
Sauron unleashes a heavy assault upon Gondor. Gandalf arrives at Minas Tirith to alert Denethor of the impending attack. The city is besieged, and Denethor, deceived by Sauron, gives up hope and commits suicide, nearly taking his remaining son Faramir with him. With time running out, Aragorn feels he has no choice but to take the Paths of the Dead, accompanied by Legolas and Gimli. There Aragorn raises an undead army of oath-breakers bound by an ancient curse. The ghostly army help them to defeat the Corsairs of Umbar invading southern Gondor. Commandeering the ships of the Corsairs, Aragorn leads reinforcements up the Anduin to relieve the siege of Minas Tirith, and the forces of Gondor and Rohan defeat Sauron's army in the Battle of the Pelennor Fields.
Meanwhile, Sam rescues Frodo from the tower of Cirith Ungol, and they set out across Mordor. In order to distract Sauron from his true danger, Aragorn leads the armies of Gondor and Rohan in a march on the Black Gate of Mordor. His vastly outnumbered troops fight desperately against Sauron's forces. Reaching the edge of the Cracks of Doom, Frodo is unable to resist the Ring any longer, and claims it for himself. Gollum suddenly reappears, struggles with Frodo and bites off his finger, Ring and all. Celebrating wildly, Gollum falls into the fire, taking the Ring with him. With the destruction of the One Ring, Sauron perishes, along with the Nazgûl, and his armies are thrown into such disarray that Aragorn's forces emerge victorious.

that is the story
other LOTR artwork of mine:
:thumb327462140::thumb324611190::thumb324564146::thumb298350523::thumb211940262::thumb209201679:
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The first sources of light for all of Arda were two enormous Lamps: Illuin, the silver one to the north and Ormal, the golden one to the south. These were cast down and destroyed by Melkor. Afterward, the Valar went to Valinor, and Yavanna sang into existence the Two Trees, silver Telperion and golden Laurelin shedding light comparable to moon and sun. Telperion was referred to as male and Laurelin female. The Trees sat on the hill Ezellohar located outside Valimar. They grew in the presence of all of the Valar, watered by the tears of Nienna.
Each tree was a source of light: Telperion's silver and Laurelin's gold. Telperion had dark leaves (silver on one side) and his silvery dew was collected as a source of water and of light. Laurelin had pale green leaves trimmed with gold, and her dew was likewise collected by Varda.
One "day" lasted twelve hours. Each Tree, in turn, would give off light for seven hours (waxing to full brightness and then slowly waning again), so that at one hour each of "dawn" and "dusk" soft gold and silver light would be given off together.
Jealous Melkor, later named Morgoth by Fëanor, enlisted the help of the giant spider-creature Ungoliant (the first great spider, ancestor of Shelob, and possibly a fallen Maia) to destroy the Two Trees. Concealed in a cloud of darkness, Melkor struck each Tree and the insatiable Ungoliant devoured whatever life and light remained in them.
Again Yavanna sang and Nienna wept, but they succeeded only in reviving Telperion's last flower (to become the Moon) and Laurelin's last fruit (to become the Sun). These were assigned to lesser spirits, male Tilion and female Arien, after the 'genders' of the Trees themselves. This is why, in The Lord of the Rings, the Sun is usually referred to as "she" and the moon as "he".
However the true light of the Trees, before their poisoning by Ungoliant, was said to now reside only in the three Silmarils, created by Fëanor the most gifted of the Elves.

other LOTR artwork of mine:
:thumb333000165::thumb328677422::thumb327462140::thumb324611190::thumb324564146::thumb298350523::thumb211940262::thumb209201679:
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There Melian came, the Lady grey,
and dark and long her tresses lay,
beneath her silver girdle seat
and down unto her silver feet.
She is a Maia of the race of the Ainur, akin to Yavanna. Before the First Age, in the Years of the Trees, she left the gardens of Lórien and went to Middle-earth, and there she fell in love with the Elven-king Elu Thingol, King Greymantle, and with him ruled the kingdom of Doriath. She had a child with Thingol, a daughter named Lúthien, said to be the fairest and most beautiful of all the Children of Ilúvatar. Melian's line of descent is the half-elven and Kings of Númenor.

Thingol encountered Melian in the woods of Nan Elmoth and fell under Melian's enchantment of love for long, long years. As a result of his absence a portion of his followers stayed behind to search for him; the rest continued on to Valinor.Melian and Thingol thereafter founded the kingdom of Doriath in Middle-earth. Their daughter Lúthien Tinúviel married the Man Beren. As a result Melian's Maian blood passed to both Elves and Men.

more art about LOTR :
:thumb348024202::thumb344290706::thumb335476094::thumb333000165::thumb328677422::thumb327462140::thumb324611190::thumb324564146::thumb298350523::thumb211940262::thumb209201679:
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Melkor
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Feanor
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Maiar Melian
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"For they came to the seat of Morgoth in his nethermost hall that was upheld by horror, lit by fire, and filled with weapons of death and torment. There Beren slunk in wolf's form beneath his throne; but Luthien was stripped of her disguise by the will of Morgoth, and he bent his gaze upon her. She was not daunted by his eyes; and she named her own name, and offered her service to sing before him, after the manner of a minstrel. Then Morgoth looking upon her beauty conceived in his thought an evil lust, and a design more dark than any that had yet come into his heart since he fled from Valinor. Thus he was beguiled by his own malice, for he watched her, leaving her free for awhile, and taking secret pleasure in his thought. Then suddenly she eluded his sight, and out of the shadows began a song of such surpassing loveliness, and of such blinding power, that he listened perforce; and a blindness came upon him, as his eyes roamed to and fro, seeking her."

--The Silmarillion, of Beren and Luthien

How to draw a god; step one, accept the inherent futility of the endeavor; that anything you do will inevitably fall far short of conveying the power, terror, majesty and general 'godliness' of your subject.

One of the greatest difficulties in depicting gods (whether the valar of tolkien's world or the ancient greek/roman/nordic deities upon whom they are largely based) in a way that feels right and consistent with their character, stature and abilities, is that the gods are usually not that consistent in these things themselves, ranging wildly in their scale and their impact from the cosmic and metaphysical to the extremely temporal, even human (Melkor for example is the reason the world has clouds and winter snow, but  somehow he can't destroy the Trees of Yavanna by himself, and apparently you can hurt him with a steel sword, go figure) In Melkor's case, Tolkien at least seems to have tried to offer some rationalization for his devolution into an ever smaller and pettier entity (unlike the authentic myths of the greeks or nordics, which rarely obligate themselves to making any kind of sense) Morgoth is said to have lost his ability to leave his physical form like the other valar can do, presumably from his continued pouring forth of his own power and divine grace in an effort to establish himself as temporal god-king on earth. His fall into evil (or rather his discovery/creation of it) seems to have been chiefly motivated by that same force which in many religious traditions draws people (and angels) away from the will of God, Ego. Melkor wants to be his own master, he wants to be God unto himself, and have power over others. In this respect he is not so different from "evil" men - either of tolkien's fictional world or of our very real one - who hold themselves as all-important to the point of having no qualms about dominating and subjugating others. He is in some ways the original sociopath, believing all others to be either enemies or pawns for his uses, and having no love except for himself. If Melkor, his motivations and his ultimate trajectory says anything about evil, it is that, even in it's divine origin, evil is indeed stupendously banal; one of the first things that strikes about his "vision" (if he might be said to posses one) is just how limited it is, seeming to be motivated mainly by small-minded anger and jealousy, directed at increasingly smaller targets (first at God the father, then his fellow Ainur, and eventually down as far as elves and men) his only creations are perverse ripoffs, mockeries and re-appropriations of what others have done (though, to give credit where credit is due, dragons are irrefutably kick-ass ;)) I wanted to portray him, despite his goliathine stature, as appearing somewhat small and shrunken in his own trappings; the sharp spires of his Iron Crown rising to ridiculous heights, beyond any sense of scale or proportion, dwarfing the wearer. I imagine that, when finally uncrowned by Eonwe, the last power he could put forth to cause himself to appear beautiful or even formidable dissipates, leaving something that looks like a cross between a leper and a full body burn victim, the poison of his malice having indeed spoiled the jar it was kept in.

despite this, and despite being locked by this point into one form, morgoth is still a Vala, and still possessed of tremendous powers of both force and persuasion which make him a nigh unassailable adversary for the Children of Illuvatar. I imagine that, while unable to "go unclad" or to appear fair, as he did with the noldor in valinor, he is still capable of presenting different "versions" of himself suited to different audiences (like the many, many faces of Gary Oldman's Dracula) he emerges for battle with Fingolfin an armored titan, and appears before Hurin as the overlord of all creation, incontestable in his might, wisdom, and authority. His appearances are varied in their scale and their intended impact, but all conforming to a unified will and vision. here I thought he should appears as the Seductor; striding forward to meet the young, pure elven maiden like some dark prince; exuding power, poise and a kind of predator's charisma (Luthien is half an Ainur herself, and he has successfully brought many of them under his sway in the past)

my influences for this one were too many to keep count of, but among them William Blake's "Great Red Dragon" paintings and the beautiful, terrifying imagery from Tarsem Singh's  "The Cell" deserve special mention (not that my humble endeavor really lives up to either)

Part of the Weekly Tolkien Sketchblog
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Study for a painting (famous last words)

"Thus Ar-Pharazon, King of the Land of the Star, grew to the mightiest tyrant that had yet been in the world since the reign of Morgoth, though in truth Sauron ruled all from behind the throne. But the years passed, and the King felt the shadow of death approach as his days lengthened; and he was filled with fear and wrath. Now came the hour that Sauron had prepared and long had awaited. And Sauron spoke to the King, saying that his strength was now so great that he might think to have his will in all things, and be subject to no command or ban."

--The Silmarillion

I always envisioned the above passage as a specific scene: we see the king in his gymnasium, badly winded after a (loosing) sparring match; he angrily dismisses his trainer and attendants and sits alone, feeling the weight of his age and the creeping loss of his strength, a wound to his great pride. enter Sauron, like a shark smelling blood in the water, ready to make his long-prepared sales pitch. It seemed fitting for Ar Pharazon (who I've always imagined as this great physical presence, like Henry VIII in his prime, and quite vain) to be frustrated and resentful at the loss of his prowess as a fighter and athlete, and fear it as the first sign of his own impending death.

Sauron fell into place rather easily in this one, though it was hard to resist the impulse to "armor up" his clothing or to rely too heavily on the John Howeian "eeeevil" aesthetic of straight, upward pointing spikes (for my money, the Akallabeth presents Sauron at his absolutely most formidable; single-handedly orchestrating the destruction of Numenor and a sort of miniature 'fall from grace' for men, and doing it all without his vast armies or his terrible servants or even his Ring, just by pure Hannibal Lecter-style power of persuasion, so armoring him kind of sends the wrong message) I Imagined him here as he would appear during his turn as the Priest of Morgoth. His dark robes and head piece have a little bit of everything in them, Arabic, Turkish, Cambodian, ancient Egyptian, African, medieval gothic, and just pinch of HR Giger in that slightly skeletal folded array on his breast and weirdly elongated head. with sauron's "fair form" I always pictured this bone white (luminous even) face, beautiful and unfathomable, like a living ancient greek statue, emerging from this very tall, sweeping black-robed form, quite cool and androgynous beside the king's huffing and puffing masculinity (gender seems like a rather arbitrary and optional flourish for the Ainur)

Ar-Pharazon's pose took some doing to finally get right; tensed and angry, but also sagging and impotent in his anger. I wanted him to feel like an aged, over-the-hill boxer or wrestler (the ancient greek "Boxer of Quirinal" statue was an inspiration, as well as some pretty unpleasant recent beach pics of Hulk Hogan) right at that tipping point in mid-to-late-age when a man's physical strength begins to fail him (contrasted by sauron's consummate agelessness)

Another piece for the weekly tolkien sketchblog (I dont know why I've been on such a Numenor binge lately)

See also:

Ar-Pharazon turnermohan.deviantart.com/art…
Sauron (1st age) turnermohan.deviantart.com/art…
Numenorean Queen turnermohan.deviantart.com/art…
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Allatar and Pallando (no doubt known by different names at this point) meet for a chai, somewhere in the vast expanses of the East.

The blue wizards fascinate me. They are perhaps the two most significant absentees of the events of the third age in the west in middle-earth, having ventured off east and never returning; theirs was the only (remarked upon) excursion of the ainur into the east, and in them and their story (what precious little we have of it) as with little details like the oliphants or the "apes of the southern juggles," middle-earth is expanded out beyond being merely some pseudo-european mythical world and comes to feel more like a fictionalized version of, well, the whole world. Tolkien changed his mind a few times about the blue wizards; his original concept, presented in he appendices to the Lord of the Rings and in the Unfinished Tales, placed them as the last two members of the istari, who went far out into the east of middle-earth and never returned, founding cults and magic traditions, but in this early concept, generally speaking, the blue wizards (like radaghast and saruman) are supposed to have failed in their larger mission (to inspire the people of middle earth to action and contest the rise of Sauron) becoming terminally side-tracked in their journeys. His later conception of the duo was less critical, placing their arrival in middle-earth midway through the second age, several thousand years before Saruman Gandalf and Radaghast, and in this version they are remarked to have had a great impact as missionaries to the east, successfully combating the influence of evil and instilling in the peoples and cultures of the far off eastern lands some much needed knowledge of the Powers in the True West.

personally I can't make up my mind as to which concept I like better. I definitely prefer the notion of the five Istari coming to middle-earth as a unit, and the concept of maiar spirits being sent to middle-earth to do a particular job and instead becoming lost in the vastness of the world is really interesting to me, much more interesting than them simply carrying out the rather narrow task of missionary work, but at the same time it's nice to think that the Valar would give SOME thought to the children of men outside of the edain (the case has been made elsewhere - and I think it's a sound one - that it's just a little douchey of both the elves and the Valar to hold it against the "evil" men of the south and east that they came to worship the only one of the divine powers who actually bothered to show himself to them) and if the blue wizards were sent to middle-earth with stated purpose of going east, it is reasonable to believe that through their influence the peoples and cultures out there gained some awareness of the creator and the divine truth of the world they live in.

It was suggested to me that the Blue Wizards should look ethnically like the people of the farther regions of middle-earth who they would be interacting with, which seems especially fitting if they were indeed MEANT to go east (and provided a great opportunity, artistically, to draw on "wizards" from non-european cultures). I was going for a very central-asian feel to their rendezvous setting, and also to have them look like they've been living apart, among different peoples in different lands (the "East" always reffered to as one unified, villainous entity by westerners, is infact far bigger and more diverse than the west). it was a matter of some debate for me whether or not they should still retain their blue robes (leave it to the valar to be tone-deaf enough to clothe their two emmisarries heading out farthest into hostile territory in the rarest and therefore most conspicuous dye color, because it's "the color of the sea") but finally i thought they should retain their colors, reworked and re-tailored as cultural stylings dictate, and finally hidden (like gandalf's white) under less attention-grabbing garments.  imagine the two meeting for the first time in many, many years, possibly to discuss the reemergence of sauron, (or maybe just to catch up over a nice bowl of hashish)

this was a really fun picture to do and to think about. maybe there's an inherent fondness for those tantalizing little side characters we only get to hear a word or two about, but I've got to love the blue wizards for going out east and becoming immersed. i see them as the sort of rebellious ones; they came to do their mission but got kind of floored by how huge and awe inspiring the world is, and came to develop a personal affinity for the under-cared-for people of the east, as both inherently good, empathetic children of illuvatar, and as a people under constant pressure from the forces of evil. I like to think that in attempting to undo things like dragon-worship and curb the spread of ruthless mordor-supported warlords, they had alot of work cut out for them - not the least of which being relentlessly hunted by servants of sauron - and came in time to relish the task (saruman is of course rebellious as well, but more like the ivy league educated success case who crashes and burns in his mid thirties, they "failed in different ways" as tolkien puts it)
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Illustration to "The Silmarillion" by J.R.R.Tolkien.
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Illustration to "The Silmarillion" by J.R.R.Tolkien.
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Illustration to "The Lay of Leithian" by J.R.R.Tolkien.
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“Three Rings for the Elven-kings under the sky,
Seven for the Dwarf-lords in halls of stone,
Nine for Mortal Men, doomed to die,
One for the Dark Lord on his dark throne
In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie.
One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them,
One Ring to bring them all and in the darkness bind them.
In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie.”


― J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings

...another sketch in my diary
watercolor, ink, acrylic

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Front page of my diary:)
watercolor, ink pen, white gel pen
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...The Road goes ever on and on
Down from the door where it began.
Now far ahead the Road has gone,
And I must follow, if I can,
Pursuing it with eager feet,
Until it joins some larger way
Where many paths and errands meet.
And whither then? I cannot say...

J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

Watercolors, acrylic, ink

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Arakano in Araman, before the crossing of the Grinding Ice.
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Artaresto son of Arafinwe
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.
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some people said to me that this elf looks like Fingon :) I didn't think of him during drawing, but that's nice idea.
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10 years ago, pen and drawing ink.
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in the Lord of the Rings 
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From Tolkien's " Silmarillion":

The Maiar are less powerful than the Valar, the gods of Middle Earth; some kind of angelic, elemental spirits.
All of them serve their particular Valar.
I didn't draw the later Blue Wizards or Balrogs, for I had no real picture of them in mind (yet).

Btw: Even non-Silmarillion-readers will discover some people they know in the first and last row.



Short and easy Who is Who:

Eonwe: Manwe’s banner-bearer and herald, one of the chiefs of the Maiar, said to be the best in Arda with weapons.

Ilmare: Varda’s handmaiden, one of the chiefs of the Maiar, her name may mean as much as ‘starlight’.

Mairon: Originally one of the Maiar of Aule, Mairon’s love for crafting and perfection made him the ideal victim for Melkor, for whom he spied some time before he joined him openly and made quite a career under his new name Sauron ("The Abhorred"). After his master was finally kicked into the Void by the other Valar, Sauron took over business very successfully.

 
Melian:
Serving Vana and Este, Melian accidently fell in love with the later great elvenking Thingol and stayed with him in Middle Earth. They had one beautiful daughter named Luthien, who became quite legendary. After Luthien chose mortality and Thingol’s –violent- death, Melian returned to Valinor.

 
Arien:
Serving Vana and Varda, Arien was one of the few Maiar of flame unspoiled by Melkor and chosen to guide the sun. It’s said her eyes were so bright that nobody could look into them.

 
Tilion:
Originally one of Oromes hunters, Tilion loved silver and was chosen to guide the moon. He was a bit reckless, which explains the irregular behavior of the moon. He wanted to be near Arien who guided the sun and tried to catch up with her, but whenever he reached her he got burned so the moon appeared black before the sun.


Osse: One of the Maiar serving Ulmo, Osse loved storms and was quite a wild guy altogether, which explains why he temporally joined Melkor and smashed some coasts and isles for him. Only his wife could calm down Osse - he regretted, was forgiven and served Ulmo again.


Uinen: One of the Maiar of Ulmo, wife of Osse. Uinen loved all plants and animals of the sea. Mariners pray to her for their safety, cause she is the only one who can calm down her wild ship smashing husband.


Salmar: One of the Maiar of Ulmo, Salmar made the Ulumuri for him; the great conches which produce the music of the sea.


Curumo: One of the Maiar of Aule, Curumo was chosen to go to Middle Earth as a messenger of the Valar to fight Sauron. He disobeyed his orders and was banished from Valinor. In Middle Earth, he was known as Saruman the White.


Olorin: A pupil of Nienna, dwelling in the gardens of Irmo, Olorin was said to be the wisest of all Maiar. He could indeed prove that when he was send to Middle Earth with the other Istari to counsel those who opposed Sauron, being called Gandalf the Grey.


Aiwendil: Serving Yavanna, she begged Curumo to take Aiwendil with him to Middle Earth. He became very fond of the local animals and nature, but forgot by and by why he had been originally sent to Middle Earth at all. His name there was Radagast the Brown.


Single versions of each Maiar: wolfanitas-art.tumblr.com/



The Valar:
The Silmarillion: The Valar (Complete) by wolfanita
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From Tolkien's " Silmarillion":

The whole bunch at a glance: The Valar, the gods of Middle Earth.
For those who don't want to switch to the single versions for the descriptions, you get them here again:

Melkor: He was the first and most powerful, but grew a bit too individualistic and ambitious; in the end he became the enemy of the other Valar, was named Morgoth (meaning as much as ‘foe of the world’) and can be held more or less responsible for anything bad ever happened to anybody in Middle Earth.

Manwe: Melkor’s brother (in the Valar way of kinship), Lord of the air, winds and birds, king of the Valar. Manwe doesn’t understand the nature of evil, which might explain why Melkor got away with so many things.

Varda: Lady of Light and stars, Manwe’s wife, queen of the Valar, most feared by Melkor (she rebuffed him) and most loved by the elves who call her Elbereth.

Ulmo: Lord of the sea, who had a soft spot for the mortal world and liked to wander there (or swim), in a form that appeared quite fearful to non-godly eyes.

Aule: Lord of crafting and substances, godly smith and creator of the dwarves who call him Mahal. In his creativity he is similar to Melkor, which might explain why he employed two guys who were later known as Sauron and Saruman.

Yavanna: Lady of plants, giver of fruits, wife of Aule. Because she was afraid that the inhabitants of Middle Earth would destroy nature, the Ents were created.

Orome: Huntsman of the Valar, he likes to hunt in the woods on his white steed Nahar and slay monsters on the way; at one of these occasions he discovered the first new born elves. He’s very popular among the people of Rohan.

Nienna: Lady of mercy, grief and mourning, she taught a lot about pity and wisdom to somebody later known as Gandalf.

Mandos: Also known as Namo, ruler of the dead and judge of the Valar, brother of Nienna. He’s said to be quite grim, which might be no big surprise considering he (almost) knew everything yet to come.

Lorien: Also known as Irmo, Lord of visions and dreams, brother of Mandos and Nienna. His beautiful garden was a place to rest and refresh.

Este: Lady of rest, healer of hurts and weariness, wife of Lorien, slept during the days in their garden.

Vaire: The godly weaver; she weaves the story of the world, wife of Mandos.

Vana: Also called the Ever-young, the younger sister of Yavanna and wife of Orome. Flowers sprang and birds sang when she passed.

Tulkas: The champion of the Valar, came to their aid against Melkor. Though he’s the most warlike of the Valar, he likes to laugh and is not easily made angry, but if, he’s also very slow to forgive.

Nessa: Quite a lively young lady, Nessa could outrun a deer and loved to dance. She’s the younger sister of Orome and married Tulkas.



Single versions of each Valar: wolfanitas-art.tumblr.com/


The costume sketches: wolfanita.deviantart.com/art/C…

  The Silmarillion: The Valar - Couples Version by wolfanita  The Silmarillion: The Aratar by wolfanita  The Silmarillion: The Lesser Valar by wolfanita The Silmarillion: The Maiar by wolfanita 


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Touch It Prints and other nice stuff available here:  society6.com/wolfanita


:gallery: More Tolkien fan art: wolfanita.deviantart.com/galle…

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I noticed it was - at least for me - quite funny to design the various Valar seperately and then see the finished character standing next to his or her spouse for the first time.
That's why I made this alternative version of my The Valar picture; all couples are standing together.
Attention matchmakers; singles are standing left at the beginning of each row!


Single versions of each Valar: wolfanitas-art.tumblr.com/


 Who's who click here:

     The Silmarillion: The Valar by wolfanita  The Silmarillion: The Maiar by wolfanita 
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Touch It Prints and other nice stuff available here:  society6.com/wolfanita


:gallery: More Tolkien fan art: wolfanita.deviantart.com/galle…

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******************************** w00t!  +favlove Thank you for your favourites and comments!   +favlove w00t! ********************************
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"H" is for horror. :skull:
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:iconbetteo:
A very simple piece from last year.
I still like it!
YUM!
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A recent selection from my daily blog. [link]

A daily piece since dec. 2006. :halfliquid: Go, bookmark, and quench your thirst for randomness!!
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Inspired by Mr. J.R.R. Tolkien & MarinArk [link]

The Lord of the Rings (2001-2003 Movie) © New Line Cinema/WingNut Films
not for commercial use!
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Inspired by Mr. J.R.R. Tolkien & MarinArk

The Lord of the Rings (2001-2003 Movie) © New Line Cinema/WingNut Films
not for commercial use!
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Inspired by Mr. J.R.R. Tolkien & MarinArk
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