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Additional info. for this tutorial : [link]

Also check out my foot casting tutorial, more useful info : [link]

12th Feb 2012 Hope this makes sense. I'll check for errors when I've got time.......:(

I actually felt nauseous and felt briefly like throwing up after many of the hairs had been pulled off my forearm...... Skin turned bright red from the hair pulling......

17th Feb I've made 2 more hands since this one, so will provide a 'supplementary' tutorial alongside this one SOON.....
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Revised DIY facecast from March 2012.....


I failed to mention in the tutorial :) if you have hair be careful to protect it from the plaster!!!! I've seen on the internet and been told that a bathing cap can be used for this. They are very elastic.
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A similar and better latex pig prosthetic mask created by me, is for sale here: www.etsy.com/listing/154865410…

Video: youtu.be/avpB85zDTS0

15/10/2012 2nd time I've tried on these prosthetics. This time I glued on the snout a little lower, and in the end even got the mouth to move quite a bit.......

It's pretty roughly painted up with water based face paint...as is my head shoulders and one arm, then it ran out :)

I wanted to make more of these and try and sell them, but the jaw mould especially didn't turn out very well.......:(

I will try again......
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Ravenwood Masks [link]

Making a negative mold out of #1 Pottery Plaster for casting a neoprene mask.

Sculpture made from WED clay over a 1/2 face hydro-cal lifecast.

You can also use this kind of mold for paper mache casting or latex casting.

This photo is for entertainment. It is not intended as a tutorial. There are far too many steps left out for this to be a useful tutorial.


Photos by Ravenwood Masks [link]
Completed mask photo by Dar Totten
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This was a commision for a client's Hawkgirl cosplay.

It was the most challenging leather pattern I have made so far. I'm very happy with how it came out. It is satisfying after working hard and struggling with something to end with a mask that makes me feel proud of the work. 

It is sculpted out of two pieces of 6 oz veg tanned leather. The back inserts are black pig skin suede. 

Sculpted by Alyssa Ravenwood, Ravenwood Masks
Contact to purchase

Website: www.ravenwoodmasks.com ravenwoodmasks.mysupadupa.com/
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Black Cat cosplay

"Excitement" leather mask by Ravenwood Masks
Available to purchase here: [link]

Cosplay and photo: Jessica Lynn Gonzalez
Photo used with permission. All rights reserved.
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Face it:
Pigs are fast,fornicating,fantastic creatures who stink
of rancid awesomeness!
...Yeah,riiiight...
-------------------------------
[link]
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Come closer aaand...
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improved my wolf make up with a more fitting background
to enter the ´´face your monster contest´´

many thanks to *joannastar-stock and ~Ariagne-stock
for the background [link] [link]
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Thanks to Bamadave for his awesome stock pic!
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Thanks to bamadave for his nice stock footage.
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He got what he asked for ^^
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A redo of my old Ultracal mold tutorial, now with clearer text and pictures! I still had the sculpt from my coyote/medium canine nose, so I went ahead and whipped up a new tutorial with some additional tips I've learned since making the last one.

As always, if you have questions please feel free to ask!
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A tutorial on how I make my pawpads, using the material from this Instructable! [link]
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Due to interest, I went ahead and threw together a tutorial for a simple ultracal mold. This is the process I use to make all of mu pawpad and nose molds. The tongues are a two part mold, and I'll be doing a follow-up tutorial on that here soon as well ^^ Feel free to ask any questions I didn't make clear!
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Yes Dike is pregnant ^^ 
This cub "Siri" is a male, and he is inspired from the orange cub on "Sarabi says" he seems to be older ( biger) the the others => th09.deviantart.net/fs71/PRE/f…
Nala, Simba etc... will be born soon. 


Page 99: gemini30.deviantart.com/art/Th…

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Yes, Nefertari is now ( she wasn't in my first version in my mind) Sarafina's sister. Their father is a white lion, Sarafina is more after him, ( very light fur) and Nefertari is more after their mother Nyota.

Page 7: gemini30.deviantart.com/art/Th…

Page 9: gemini30.deviantart.com/art/Th…
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Page inspired by :icondreamyarcticwolf: she did a drawing during the last contest who inspired me! 

Page 95: gemini30.deviantart.com/art/Be…

Page 97: gemini30.deviantart.com/art/Be…


If you have anything to ask => ask.fm/gemini30110
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my new poster :)
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OK Here's a Quick Tutorial. It was late spending about 5 hours on side A to build up walls and stuff and do the plaster dental stone mold. Up to 2:20am to finally finish Side A.

Next day was easy spent about 1 hour + to make side B. Then the real adventures begin. De-molding is a like a delicate surgery especially with Hard clay. I had trouble opening it then I figured out a way (took the night off for this- No Rushing despite deadlines) to Use Hot Water to fill in the gaps after cracking the edges a little bit to find the separation line. Slowly filling and chiseling with flat chisels and separating both sides until it was effortless.

I had a rib muscle injury the other day riding on my scooter which end up being a good thing. Normally I would use my manly Hulk Power Muscles to pry these 2 open which would funking destroyed it. Luckily I compensated power with smarts and gently pry the 2 halves apart using the hot water method.

This is a good technique for all plaster molds. If you can't separate the 2 halves mold with a gentle handshake then don't do it.

Anyway Separating the head and melted the face gave me another Pet project idea: A demon Wolvy or Batty.

Now on to casting in latex... Urrrghhh!
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This is a Shaman Saber Wolf Skull Helmet from Disgaea. Apparently its a popular game.

This is one of the last of 2 castings made. The mold broke, repairable unless someone wants another casting. It will be in storage.

Commission for :iconabsol:
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FX School of Hard Knocks: Intro to the world of Propmaking.

OK a lot of nice people have written to me saying they want to learn how to do what I do and was wondering if I can share some secrets over NOTEs.

I don't want to seem like I'm blowing off you guys who are noobs to the Prop making but there are a few things you need to know before you waste money and time to find out this is not what you had in mind. So this is me giving you a basic picture of what it is like - in words.

First thing you guys need to know is "Prop Making" deals with making REAL LIFE PHYSICAL PROPS THAT ARE MADE WITH CHEMICALS AND A LOT OF MONEY COSTING MATERIALS THAT COULD BE HAZARDOUS TO YOUR HEALTH.  We make Real Things that can be seen and touched. We are not making drawings or concept art or some imaginary thing. So anything that is physical will need a lot of production time, creative skill, mental energy and a Whole Lotta materials!

Materials cost money:
- If you want to get into prop making, you gotta have a Day Job, Rich Mommy and Daddy, a Wife that believes in you or a Sugar Mama (that's what I got) to support you!
- If you don't have money just stick to pencil and paper and keep imagining them.
- The materials, if you had the money, need proper space as well to store away from the Sun, heat source or safe from your kids, where u sleep and away from your Pets!

Note: Another reason why I can't tell you specifics about materials cuz its different in every country. What I use and what you have is totally different. Brands of silicone are different and how much catalyst to use is vary by manufacturer and quality. Much of it is trial and error. So the Prop-making forums are your best shot.

The knowledge:
- OK There's no freaking way I can tell you guys everything there is to know about making Props, simply because I don't know everything, and there's lots to learn!
- How I learned what I do is mostly from Trial and Error by buying small samples of materials and doing a lot of tests making molds of small stuff and work from there.
- I also watch a lot of movie DVDs with extra bonus features on them on all the creature fx movies like Predator, Aliens and anything with special effects. Other videos are from John Brown Gnomon Workshop videos: the sculptor shows you how to sculpt and mold these things.
- Then everything else is from youtube looking for anything about: oil clay, sculpting, molding, silicone, casting, resin, fiberglass, etc.
- The rest you gotta use Google!
- If there is some reputable FX Studio in your town, no matter how small and insignificant they are, sign up to be their Intern and learn from the bottom up!

Trial by Fire... and resin fiberglass: Mental Preparation
Prop making is all about effort.Mentally, physically and creatively.  You will FAIL about 100 times before you get the results you want. It's about skill and technical knowledge to properly use the materials safely and taking care of them. These materials won't just come together and produce nice looking Predator Helmets. Don't I wish? LOL  

Most important when going into this Prop making for hobby or business is: Your heart gotta be in it. Otherwise you will give up after a few weeks.

You really must possess a resilient mind that see Failure = Challenge that can be overcome.  Whether its mistakes or accidents or simply poor planning you will mess up. You will forget to do something simple like applying mold release or Vaseline, it will mess up days and hours of work and a lot of materials will be lost. Nothing you can do but work through it. Experienced Pros still makes these simple mistakes which is why they work methodically, planning everything and knowing what they need to do BEFORE they do it.

This is something I myself have to learn the hard way and for 3 years I am still forgetting simple things. I've learned to: pre-plan more and do less, unless I know what to do.

But what ever happen if this is something is in your heart and this is something you want to do as a hobby or potential business as an Artist, you will prevail!

I took a personality test (MBTI) and I found out I was a "INTJ". In short I am someone perfect for this Prop making because I see failure, problems as challenges that can be solved. But in any case a strong mental out look and persistence will give you the results you see in my gallery. Without this you won't get anywhere.


Temper Temper: Accidents will happen.
You will see your money go down the drain whether you've add too much catalyst to the silicone or simply Ooops knocked a gallon of resin on the floor and spilled it out and anything similar. Mistakes will drive u crazy but it will also make you learn. So that is why we fuck up. Don't give up. Salvage what you can and if you can't, let it go. "No use crying over spilled resin"

Whether you mess up sculpting, or have a perfectly sculpted piece to have your cat or your clumsy ass elbow knock it on the floor, you gotta chill out. It happens. I don't know how many times I've scraped clay off accidentally cuz I didn't plan my working space well and such. You will get frustrated and very easily. Freaking poltergeists in the studio will mess with you. The Gods of Props will test your heart and whether you have what it takes to make into the Halls of Prophallar.

Safety:
Very simple. All the materials you use will either produce toxic gases, irritate your eyes and lungs, seep into your fingernails and skin to cause swelling and most of them will eventually give you Cancer!  Stan Winston died from a blood cancer that's a result of these chemicals so wear latex gloves, respirators and safety goggles. Read the instruction manuals that come with the chemicals before you even buy it. Smooth-on.com has a lot of MTSD data sheets you can download for any materials you are interested in on how to use it and what precautions you need to take to use it. Learn as much as you can before spending 1 cent on them. If you don't know, email them, call them and find out online as much as you can. Then buy it, take it home and use in small amounts. When you get a hang of it then go ahead and use it!

Have a water machine nearby:
If you work long hours in the studio or in your garage, especially in the summer, prepare to sweat! I now wear goretex athletic type clothing that allows easy evaporation cuz I work hard non stop all day. You will be prying plaster mold halves and carrying gallons of silicone around or simply trimming 20 resin fiberglass masks, you will be sweating a little. Even if you don't do heavy production and its just one mask, you will also feel the heat. OK I'm exaggerating. LOL

It's hard work. That's why you will sweat. If you're one of those people who think "Oh I'm damn talented" Prop making will test you!  Professional FX people are so hard core that even when they are totally exhausted working late hours they still need to produce Top Quality results catching impossible deadlines.

In conclusion, Prop making is all about Fun, backed by a lot of hardwork.

Don't sweat it if you mess up. We are all humans. Have fun doing it. I almost gave up many times. But I took breaks, mental breaks, physical breaks and psychological breaks. Give it time you will get the results you want. You will learn. There is nothing I can tell you over notes that will be the "end all be all, ultimate knowledge." I am still learning and I fuck up EVERYDAY. There's no point showing you a gallery or mistakes or maybe I should? LOL.

There are tons of Propmaking forums out there with a lot more people who will put me to shame with what they know. Learn from them as I have. Visit these forums to start. There are more and you can always search with google.

www.thehunterslair.com
www.therpf.com

A Video behind the scenes of what I do: vimeo.com/3831765

So have Fun doing it. Once you start to get the results you want, you will feel fulfilled with a sense of accomplishment. This is my true goal: obtain achievement through my hard work.

This FX prop making really builds character. If you can get some materials to come together like a symphony, planning and prepping all steps and perfecting your methodology and creating beautiful music, even if it's only audible by your own ears, you have achieved Perfection… or come close to it, its good enough.

Good Luck and have Fun making Props!

Written by Mike Loh
michaelloh.deviantart.com
Before you send me questions about making Props. Please read this.
If you want to get into prop making read this before you start.

Thanks for your understanding.

Here's my Mike the Mask Maker Video: [link]

My Bone-Hunter in Chinajoy: www.youtube.com/watch?v=YXTl1zD8WjU
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An overview to explain how we mold and cast our mask bases.

WEAR CHEMICAL RESISTANT GLOVES, A RESPIRATOR, AND PROTECTIVE CLOTHING!
I'll say it again:
WEAR CHEMICAL RESISTANT GLOVES, A RESPIRATOR, AND PROTECTIVE CLOTHING!
DO NOT DO THIS NEAR FOOD SURFACES! DO NOT EAT OR DRINK NEAR YOUR WORK AREA! DO NOT HANDLE OR USE THESE CHEMICALS NEAR CHILDREN OR PETS!
If I see anyone else blatantly ignoring basic safety precautions, I absolutely will take this tutorial down.

PLEASE READ the whole description! It explains all the steps, lists materials used here, and links to smooth-on.com where I buy my rubbers and resins.
I WILL NOT answer any questions the answers to which are in the descriptions or can easily be answered with a visit to smooth-on's website (or even a quick google search). I will also not detail this process further.


Description of steps:

9.) I am using plaster bandage* to make the mothermold (also called a matrix or support shell). I moisten several long strips (probably about half a roll or more) and start applying them to the mask surface at the edges.

10.) The mothermold is done in two halves. I build up a ridge in the middle where the two halves wil meet.

11.) The first side is completed, smoothed out, and left to fully set.

12.) I apply a strip of aluminum foil to the ridge that I built up on the first half of the mothermold. This will help separate the two halves later.

13.) The second half of the mothermold is applied same as the first.

14.) Once both halves are set (and preferably completely dry), they are gently pried apart and removed.

15.) And finally, the silicone is removed from the model, nested in the mothermold (the two halves of which are held together with a rubber band), and the mold is ready for casting. Notice that the original model has remained completely undamaged.


CONTINUED:
Part A: [link] Part C: [link]

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

* not necessarily everyone's mothermold material of choice. I like it because it's fast, lightweight, and fairly inexpensive. However, it's far less durable than Gypsum cement, like Ultracal. Again, though, with my high mold turnover rate anyway, I don't like to invest too much in these, and the weight of gypsum really bothers me. For a very durable mold, I would recommend a thick Gypsum mothermold.
To cut down on durability issues, though, I never use the craft grade bandages, always medical grade.

Materials used here:
Medical grade plaster bandages
Aluminum foil

To learn more about the materials I'm using, and to learn more about mold making and casting basics, visit Smooth-On.com: [link]
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An overview to explain how we mold and cast our mask bases.

WEAR CHEMICAL RESISTANT GLOVES, A RESPIRATOR, AND PROTECTIVE CLOTHING!
I'll say it again:
WEAR CHEMICAL RESISTANT GLOVES, A RESPIRATOR, AND PROTECTIVE CLOTHING!
DO NOT DO THIS NEAR FOOD SURFACES! DO NOT EAT OR DRINK NEAR YOUR WORK AREA! DO NOT HANDLE OR USE THESE CHEMICALS NEAR CHILDREN OR PETS!
If I see anyone else blatantly ignoring basic safety precautions, I absolutely will take this tutorial down.

PLEASE READ the whole description! It explains all the steps, lists materials used here, and links to smooth-on.com where I buy my rubbers and resins.
I WILL NOT answer any questions the answers to which are in the descriptions or can easily be answered with a visit to smooth-on's website (or even a quick google search). I will also not detail this process further.

Description of steps:

16.) Now, I cast the resin mask form. I will not be using a mold release agent for this casting, since the silicone has excellent release properties on its own. However, a latex or urethane mold would require release agent. I measure out equal parts of resin part A, part B, and Filler* (the cups are labeled in the photo).

17.) I mix the three components together thoroughly, and pour them into the mold. I "slush cast" or rotary cast the liquid resin, coating the interior of the mold in an even layer of resin. The resin begins to gel in about 2 minutes.

18.) Once layer one has set up, I mix up layer two. It has all of the same components, except that I also added a couple drops of black pigment (cosmetic preference, a dark-colored interior looks more finished to me).

19.) Layer two is applied the same as the first layer, and left to cure fully. If any places seem thin, I may apply a third layer, but it's usually not necessary.

20.) About 15 minutes later, I demold a perfect lightweight copy of the original model (this particular casting weighed in at 4.1 oz).



Part A: [link] Part B: [link]

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

* Ure-Fil III (completely optional!), a powdered filler which serves two major purposes - one, it makes this slush-casting (or sometimes brush-on) method much easier, and it also reduces the weight of the casting. Of course, it also decreases the cost of each casting by a little bit (since each casting then requires that much less resin), but that's mainly just a plus for me.

Materials used:
Smooth-cast 300 urethane resin (could also use smooth-cast 325 or ONYX) from Smooth-On
Ure-Fil III filler (Optional)
So-Strong black urethane resin pigment (Optional) (not necessary with ONYX)
Chemical-resistant nitrile gloves
paper cups and popsicle sticks (for mixing)


To learn more about the materials I'm using, and to learn more about mold making and casting basics, visit Smooth-On.com: [link]
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An overview to explain how we mold and cast our mask bases.

PLEASE READ the whole description! It explains all the steps, lists materials used here, and links to smooth-on.com where I buy my rubbers and resins.
I WILL NOT answer any questions the answers to which are in the descriptions or can easily be answered with a visit to smooth-on's website (or even a quick google search). I will also not detail this process further.

WEAR CHEMICAL RESISTANT GLOVES, A RESPIRATOR, AND PROTECTIVE CLOTHING!
I'll say it again:
WEAR CHEMICAL RESISTANT GLOVES, A RESPIRATOR, AND PROTECTIVE CLOTHING!
DO NOT DO THIS NEAR FOOD SURFACES! DO NOT EAT OR DRINK NEAR YOUR WORK AREA! DO NOT HANDLE OR USE THESE CHEMICALS NEAR CHILDREN OR PETS!
If I see anyone else blatantly ignoring basic safety precautions, I absolutely will take this tutorial down.

Description of steps:

1.) I start with a model in wax based plasteline. This model is done over a full head cast, but it could also be done over a face cast or any other form.

2.) I build up a rim around the sculpture, to create a retaining ledge for the silicone.

3.) Bits of clay to add support to the ledge.

4.) The head cast is laid flat and leveled. I am using a tin-cure silicone* to make the mold. Both parts of the liquid rubber are measured into mixing cups, along with a thickening agent to make brush-on easier**.

5.) The two parts are thoroughly mixed together, and then brushed onto the model. After layer one has cured mostly, I add a second layer of rubber.

6.) I quickly cast two rectangular pieces in the same silicone, which I will cut up and use to make keys (keys hold the floppy rubber more securely in the mother mold)***

7.) I add a third layer of rubber, and stick the key pieces onto the curing surface. They will permanantly fuse to the rubber as it finishes curing.

8.) Once layer three has cured, I brush on a fourth and final layer. When that layer is cured, I draw a parting line down the middle, to use as a guideline for making the mothermold.

CONTINUED:
Part B - [link] Part C - [link]

------------------------------------------------------------------

* This is not typically the rubber of choice for a brush-on mold, and this rubber in particular is formulated to be poured. Also, it has a short library life in relation to a platinum-cure silicone, and is prone to tearing. However, it's a somewhat cheaper sort of rubber than a platinum silicone, and I get the brush-on to work fine for me. Also, a high mold-turnover rate is almost ideal for me, since I tend to update these molds often, anyway. But in general I recommend platinum cure silicones - Rebound 25 from smooth-on is a favorite of many.

** Although this thickening agent, in the case of the particular silicone I am using, more accelerates the cure speed than actually thickens the rubber outright. It works for me.

*** This is totally my own freaky way of doing keys. I have never heard of anyone else keying like this, and that's because it's just silly. However, it's fast and cheap, so I'm doing it, so there.

Materials used here:
head lifecast
sulphur-free plasteline (Jolly King brand)
OOMOO 30 from smooth-on
Chemical-resistant nitrile gloves
Paper cups and popsicle sticks (for mixing)

To learn more about the materials I'm using, and to learn more about mold making and casting basics, visit Smooth-On.com: [link]
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I would have preffered cast-horns but it just wasnt an available option this go-around. Horns are 100% sculpted upholstery foam coated in latex.

Just a quikly produced piece for a freind- we're on a tight schedule for the first event x_x;

Yes I know big horn sheep arent usually that dark- but his specific character is.
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-Moving Jaw
-Use your own eyes
-Kanekalon Mane
-Shell is my original equine mold, but modified a bunch to be longer.
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Since there were a lot of requests for it. Im holding the strap a bit tighter (personal preference) for these photos so thats why my arm is all weird.

Ummmm... still need to paint that nose then its off to the buyer on monday : )

-Use your own eyes
-Moving jaw
-News opening is in January
-Whole-heads available (neck and such)

Fluffy parts are pieced in, that is, not one solid piece of fabric but cut pits carefully placed and glued and blended. New technique, pretty happy with it, and makes the masks even THINNER. Pair with eye-makeup and maybe some contacts and off you go. Can drink thru mask (with a straw) and -probably- eat simple dry stuff too (bread, crackers, nothing wet or greasy)
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